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About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

Our accessibility specialists champion inclusive design and accessibility across everything Snook does from the products we build to the services we offer.  The role focuses on ensuring what we are designing and building is inclusive and accessible to people who will use it.  At Snook we talk about inclusive design overall, that making things accessible isn’t just about websites, but overall is the service that is designed accessible to everyone who might use it.  You’ll relish working closely with our clients and partners and in co-designing services and products with users.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to jobs.snook@wearesnook.com with the title “Hire me: Accessibility Specialist”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours. [post_title] => Accessibility Specialist [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => accessibility-specialist [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-02 15:03:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-02 15:03:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19295 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19487 [post_author] => 55 [post_date] => 2020-05-28 13:20:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-28 13:20:43 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As a Tech Lead at Snook, you will work alongside our other tech leads to assist in the day-to-day running of the development work within our digital design team, and provide oversight of their technical delivery.  You will work with the team to develop digital products and services, making the best use of budget to provide value for our clients and to our internal projects. You will help create a strong team ethic and foster a culture of partnership, consistent delivery, operational excellence and continuous improvement.  You will foster strong engineering practices, team dynamics and delivery. You will have experience of user centered design and delivery and foster a good working relationship between UI/UX staff and the rest of the build team.  Our Tech Leads will report to the Head of Digital and will collaborate across our user-centered disciplines, including service design, user research, operations and comms. 

Requirements 

You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter and your notice period. Send your CV and cover letter pdfs to jobs.snook@wearesnook.com with the title “Hire me: Tech Lead”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.    [post_title] => Tech Lead [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tech-lead-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-04 10:57:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-04 10:57:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19487 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19451 [post_author] => 29 [post_date] => 2020-05-18 14:36:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-18 14:36:57 [post_content] =>

This post is the first of a series in which we’ll look at how the UK social landscape has been shaped by COVID-19 and especially government, healthcare and communities. Our focus in these posts will be to share insights and tools that people can take away to help address their own challenges. 

  At Snook, one of our missions is to work toward a kinder and smarter next era of government, and so we have an immediate interest in current shifts in how public services work. Some of these services are new and very visible, like financial support mechanisms for people and organisations in crisis, or contact-tracing initiatives.  Others, however, might be less visible, but ultimately represent longer-term changes in the relationship between government and public.  In this post, we’ll share insights that we’ve gained from developing a tool that enables local councils to run official meetings online – an example of how everyday processes of democratic decision making are being forced to change by the crisis, and what long-term impacts might result

The democratic process, live from the kitchen table 

Before the pandemic only about 12% of the UK workforce regularly worked from home, with less than 30% having ever worked from home, so relatively few people or organisations had systems in place for staff to work from home. While it attracts little mainstream attention, how best to work from home takes on a different significance when it includes core parts of our democratic process.  In the UK, local government meetings are involved in granting permits, licenses, and planning permission, as well as allocating resources and budgets in their area; and a pandemic has meant local governments  needing to find ways to hold such meetings online Defining a service that would meet the legal requirements of a democratic process in a virtual space is more complex than it might first appear. From the second week of the lockdown, Liam Hinshelwood and Liv Comberti from the Snook team began to work with Neil Terry and Chris Cadman-Dando from Adur & Worthing Councils (A&W) to do so. We wanted to describe some of their insights from the development process, and launch a set of reflections for further conversations. 

How do meetings work in physical versus virtual space?

The meeting script. Council meetings run to a tight script. Adhering to an agreed structure is what makes these meetings legally binding. Although some functions of a meeting could be done in writing rather than in person, this would remove the opportunity for everyone to express their opinion as easily, make ‘responding’ in real time more difficult, and limit public participation. Finding ways to take the script online is preferable.  The physical space. Council meetings tend to occur in purpose-built chambers. These spaces are usually organised around a hierarchy, with the person chairing the meeting and their deputies in the centre, and the legal officer seated nearby to offer guidance where necessary. Those who will present, and those who are eligible to vote on arguments, are arranged around them. This makes it easy to see who is guiding the process. The virtual space. All this changes in a virtual context. Here, everyone is ‘on the same level’. The performative characteristics of space have changed, and adjustments to behaviour are necessary – people talk over each other, need to remember to mute microphones, and we also tend to see more casual dress and participants’ homes in the background. The whole atmosphere changes.    [caption id="attachment_19474" align="aligncenter" width="1549"]The need for rapid adaptation from a built for purpose physical space to working from home is not limited to the UK. Left: An image of the empty Hackney Town Hall, UK. Right: A recent council meeting in Clinton, USA The need for rapid adaptation from a built for purpose physical space to working from home is not limited to the UK. Left: An image of the empty Hackney Town Hall, UK. Right: A recent council meeting in Clinton, USA[/caption]

What are the practical problems and solutions of moving council meetings online?

Who is responsible for tech and training? Currently there is no dedicated software to conduct either council or any other democratic meetings. Software decisions usually fall to the IT department, however, because of the urgency of moving online, the responsibility for these decisions fell to the Democratic Services Support Team at A&W. They found a need to train councillors and members of the public who were due to participate in how to use the video conferencing software and digital devices to participate in virtual meetings. Chris says “In some cases, councillors have had comparatively low exposure to modern digital technology, and it is essential that we make sure the training they receive in the necessary applications allows their other, more traditional skills (debate, scrutiny and decision making), to shine through”. Training 70 councillors was, in itself, very resource intensive – imagine what it would be like to train hundreds at larger councils.   Scale and roles have an impact. Council meetings are of different sizes, depending on location and even the subject under discussion. For example, A&W meetings are often 30-60 people, which is relatively small and can work on a call. However, for some other councils these meetings can be much larger (e.g. Birmingham Council with around 300 councillors). As Neil from A&W observes: “In a remote context you can easily control a planning committee of 8 participants, but as the numbers increase, so do the challenges, exponentially.” The roles needed in a virtual context will be, to a degree, highly connected with their scale – facilitating a call with 20 people is not the same as facilitating one with 200+!  New roles. “There’s a need for new roles and new responsibilities in these virtual council meetings,” Liv from Snook says, “and we are only just beginning to understand what these are ”. As Chris describes: “We have identified new technical roles that we would not normally have to consider at traditional meetings. This has meant that we have had to identify additional resources outside of our small Democratic Services Support Team, and train and prepare those people we bring in. In addition to this, traditional roles such as that of the chairman now require different skills and knowledge which has been challenging.” Trade-offs between software and protocol. Most council constitutions require public visibility on how each councillor has voted. In A&W, this is done by councillors verbally confirming their vote. However, in larger councils, registering hundreds of verbal votes one at a time is impractical. The processes councils follow and the tasks required are tied in with the platforms they are using. Infrastructure limitations. Designing around participants’ internet connectivity is a huge challenge. At best it can mean councillors being forced to abstain from voting on issues where they haven’t heard the full debate. The risk increases when the chair or legal counsel’s connection drops. And that’s clearly not the worst that can happen

How can we enable the public to take part – and given that digital inclusiveness is always a problem, what new challenges might arise?

Technology shifts who is being included and excluded. Liv explains: “Physical meetings may exclude parents, disabled people, or simply those living busy lives. Virtual meetings are more likely to exclude older generations or those without access to the technology needed. But overall, virtual meetings may actually be more accessible.”  A less intimidating prospect. Members of the public can now see both the meeting and what participation involves much more easily than they could before. The formality and pomp of physical meetings disappears, making them more approachable and open to all.

How can issues like these be addressed?

The biggest challenge the Snook team found was not the ability of a council team to systematically come up with a solution to every issue outlined above – something they excelled at. It was the sheer amount to think about, and the risk of overlooking or not anticipating something that turned out to be critical. As Chris points out: “In some cases we have protocols for dealing with issues and we can adapt them to the online context. However, there are challenges that you would never ever think about.”  Some councils have been discovering these the hard way. This means greater demands on council resources in a time where they are already considerably overstretched. A new tool. With this in mind, we worked with the A&W team to create an extensive blueprint of every stage of the process – from meeting set-up through post-meeting admin – in granular detail. At every stage the team considered behaviours, hardware, software, governance, and legislative risks. “They shared that what they found incredibly helpful about that”, Liv says, “was that it ensured there was nothing they hadn’t thought about – it was a very comprehensive lens. It wasn’t about putting something in each cell – in a way the blueprint acted as a checklist for them to make sure they’d thought about everything and proposed solutions”.   [caption id="attachment_19472" align="aligncenter" width="1999"]A&W Remote Council Meetings Blueprint A&W Remote Council Meetings Blueprint[/caption] A user manual for governance. Ultimately, a blueprint is a difficult thing to follow, and not every participant needs to know the whole process. Liv told us, “We need a big picture of the whole process, broken down into the different roles required, so that people can see where their role fits in, including members of the public. What we really need to exist is a user manual for each member of a council meeting”.  [caption id="attachment_19473" align="aligncenter" width="1999"]Sketch of A&W remote council meeting process by roles Sketch of A&W remote council meeting process by roles[/caption] Local variation. Such a blueprint would be different for individual councils. “ While there is a centralised Local Government Act 2000 that outlines a strong common framework for what should and shouldn’t be done, implementation is different at a local level. They are currently changing the governance to reflect the current situation”, Liam says.  At Snook, we are deeply interested in understanding what kind of long-term impact will result from these changes and interventions. While it’s likely that many councils will move back towards physical meetings, there are aspects of online provision that we would like to see pursued, especially its ability to make meetings more approachable and accessible. We see digital not just as a lever to transform delivery channels, but as a creator of new activities and roles which will shape what governance will look like around the world.  As Neil puts it: “Whilst the current legislation allowing remote meetings is only in place until next year, we’re planning on some form of remote participation being here to stay. Before the lockdown, we had pressures from those who welcomed remote participation and those who opposed it. In demonstrating what is possible, the opposition has dropped and we’re in the process of shaping the new normal”.  We’d like to thank Adur and Worthing Council for involving us in this interesting piece of work, and Benedict and Marta from Rival for partnering with us on the research for this post. If you’d like to get involved in discussing redesign of democratic processes for inclusion and accessibility in the digital age, please get in touch. [post_title] => Reflections on Covid-19: Exploring remote democratic decision making [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => exploring-remote-democratic-decision-making [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://wearesnook.com/our-principles-for-digital-inclusivity/ [post_modified] => 2020-05-18 15:36:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-05-18 15:36:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19451 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19411 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-04-22 14:37:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-04-22 14:37:28 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As a Tech Lead at Snook, you will work alongside our other tech leads to assist in the day-to-day running of the development work within our digital design team, and provide oversight of their technical delivery.  You will work with the team to develop digital products and services, making the best use of budget to provide value for our clients and to our internal projects. You will help create a strong team ethic and foster a culture of partnership, consistent delivery, operational excellence and continuous improvement.  You will foster strong engineering practices, team dynamics and delivery. You will have experience of user centered design and delivery and foster a good working relationship between UI/UX staff and the rest of the build team.  Our Tech Leads will report to the Head of Digital and will collaborate across our user-centered disciplines, including service design, user research, operations and comms. 

Requirements 

You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to jobs.snook@wearesnook.com with the title “Hire me: Tech Lead”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.    [post_title] => Tech Lead [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tech-lead [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-02 15:02:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-02 15:02:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19411 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19326 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-04-03 14:29:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-04-03 14:29:26 [post_content] =>

A crisis like Covid-19 requires urgent emergency responses. With crises come feelings of panic and we see lots of people running quickly towards the problem to help. But we know those feelings of panic tend to inhibit us to short-term thinking only.

There are various practical ways we’ve been addressing just getting on with the work we’re already doing at Snook. We’re conducting remote user research with control room operators — designing a rapid response to emergency calls seems more pressing than ever when the volume of calls they’re handling is unprecedented. We’re also continuing our work with British Sign Language communities and the National Citizen Service to improve their services. We’re running workshops using video conferencing-delivering a training session in service design for NHS National Services Scotland and convening with 100 designers and charities to look at ways to combine forces in their response to Covid-19. But it’s not just approaches to working remotely. There’s a bigger picture emerging of a world that may have to be restructured radically and will require a considered, long-term strategy to solving all the challenges which we will face globally in the wake of this.

Setting our response principles

We’ve been holding working sessions to discuss our response as a team to Covid-19. At first, we all felt a sense of panic — what can we do to help now? Apart from staying indoors and joining our local volunteer networks, where can we help? The usual questions came up, like asking if civic society needs an app to better organise themselves or building smart emergency response services? The answer was, and is, no. In the second week, we started to understand the scale of the challenge hanging over us and help clients organise and think through their emergency response. As we hit our third week of working in this ‘new normal’, we recognised we needed to set some principles about how we can support our clients past and present. We need to move from a crisis response state to being a calm supportive partner who’s looking ahead.

Our principles and approach to designing in times of crisis:

1. Show what’s possible

  Person shouting through a megaphone There are a huge number of things that need to be completely rethought right now, but bringing about these types of changes can seem overwhelming. For example, making internet access universally free to all those who are currently classified as vulnerable seemed like a pipedream. But we’re taking an approach to change a small thing and seed the bigger idea. We worked quickly with Nominet to get mobile phone operators to zero rate access to nhs.uk, so everyone can access accurate, up-to-date health information during the pandemic. A small win — and now they’re stepping up to provide access to a whole host of sites with new data packages. But this is just the start of a wider job of ensuring everyone is included in a world where there’s a growing assumption that just putting everything online is the answer. It’s not that simple. An estimated 1 in 10 households in the UK have no access to the internet. There are school pupils and students who are currently being told to do their lessons online and are simply unable to. Many elderly people feel they lack the skills to use computers, and the number of homeless is steadily rising, and while some may have phones, they frequently run out of data. These people are being allowed to fall through the cracks right now. But, with this challenge, many small prototypes working in the open can seed the change, and we’ll continue to press for these, linking them to wider positive agendas.

2. Balance immediate needs with the long-term view

Covid-19 will have a dramatic impact beyond the next week, and the month after. Not only specifically in the new normal of physically distancing that has been forced upon us but also in our ability to think, connect and live differently in the future. Who would have thought that in a matter of weeks, we could house everyone who is homeless? Or reduce our C02 emissions so quickly? In the short term, we’re supporting organisations to rethink service delivery with new Government regulations in the now — to support the people at highest risk (the elderly, the immunocompromised). But with this, we must ensure we also take a longer-term view and consider what might come next. There’s then the medium term. What’s coming in the next 4–6 weeks. Data from some of the most highly affected areas in the world such as Italy, shows us that the coming month is about to get much worse and we’ve heard from clients that workforces are depleting by up to a third in vital services like children’s social care. How we staff and continue to deliver vital services needs to be considered now and over the next few months as staff self-isolate or go off sick due to the virus. In the longer term, we’ll see much bigger impacts. How will people who’ve been in self-isolation for months feel? What are the long-term mental health impacts? How will a frontline workforce working in emergency mode feel in six months time after experiencing death, sickness and fear every day? What will happen to our food chains when we rely on much of our produce being imported and transport has been halted? What happens to homeless people we’ve housed in this period when the curve flattens? There are so many questions that need a longer-term view but need to be considered now, so we can start designing for these new needs and scenarios before they arrive on our doorstep.

3. Listen first, look second, build last

Our perspective is to listen first, understand needs, look at what exists then build if needed. We don’t know best. There are vast networks of grassroots efforts, civic sector organisations and charities that know their people and areas well. There are service providers who are experts in what they deliver and the people they support. We’ve seen a host of new services spring up, sometimes outside the organisation’s core expertise, because they saw a need and tried to fill it. We’re keen to help organisations understand their specific skill sets and how they can be put to use alongside others, stopping them from pivoting everything to solve the immediate crisis. If there’s a clear need for something new which no one else can meet, then build it. But listen first, and find out whether someone already does what’s needed and connect them up. Developing a new product or service at this time isn’t needed unless it helps with convening safely or delivering an existing service online. It will just add to the noise.

4. Meet immediate needs safely

Where there is a need, and something does need to be built, it must still meet regulations and good design principles. Yas, research and design will need to move at pace to meet new daily Government announcements or emergent societal needs. But a crisis doesn’t mean throwing out all data, ethical, privacy and accessibility principles. We have basic accessibility guidelines and tools to build quick services that work for people. We have data ethics workbooks to help us ask the questions we should ask to ensure that what we’re doing safeguards users. Organisations like the Information Commissioner’s office have provided supportive statements to help organisations get online at speed — assuring them that they won’t be penalised, but careful to ensure privacy and data standards are not dropped entirely. Even in a crisis, we should not ignore safeguarding and ethical data practice. We must think through our service designs to ensure we put no one in harm’s way.

5. Shape challenges, convene responses

Through our listening, we’re hearing common challenges from all types of organisations. Some of the simpler questions are how to deliver a support programme online. Or get digital access for the people they support. Or figure out how to support people paying for goods delivered to them who aren’t online.We can help by finding common problems and shaping these, convening the right people to solve them and publishing this knowledge. We’re about to bring this principle to life in our work across the Catalyst. This is an alliance of civil society organisations, funders, and digital agencies, incubated on behalf of the Centre for Acceleration of Social Technology. We’ve been working with them and Futuregov to build a list of common transactions that charities and civil society organisations might deliver and how these might be delivered online. We’re going to convene groups of service providers to discuss, share and publish how they’ve taken their services online so others can learn from this, in a series of patterns.

6. Stimulate learning loops

In a crisis, we have a tendency to deliver at speed then rush off to put the next fire out. But many of us are delivering services in ways we have never delivered before. We are learning what works, what doesn’t and what to do differently. We have a role to play in stimulating learning cycles and sharing them with others. Only together, can we learn how to meet the present and near-future needs well. We’re encouraging our clients to keep a short learning log during this time so they can look back and share what’s working and what needs to change. Last week, we held an online conversation involving charities, digital experts, designers, change-makers and commissioners. Someone said after the call that they’d been inspired to make sure they document their learnings, as they’re trying out lots of new ways of delivering their service remotely. Let’s keep inspiring those learnings.

Looking further into the future

We’re mindful of how often great shifts in society can happen after upheavals like this. The NHS was founded in the wake of the second world war. It cost an enormous amount of money — but aren’t we grateful for it now? It also took a great long-term vision and a commitment to the common good. The belief that things can be different and that we can design them to be better for everyone and everything on the planet seemed like a fantasy only a few weeks ago. But in the past two weeks, people are having to face a new reality that’s being foisted upon them. There’s a future to plan for beyond the pandemic. We need to reflect on what we want to keep from how we used to live and what must change to make a fairer, more sustainable future for all. We’ll be considering this in a series of posts soon. In the meantime, do get in touch if you’d like to get involved in designing the best response to the present — and the future — together. [post_title] => We need long-term thinking now more than ever [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => we-need-long-term-thinking-now-more-than-ever [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-04-06 16:43:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-04-06 16:43:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19326 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19308 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 14:45:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 14:45:09 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As a Senior Interaction Designer at Snook, you will be responsible for taking a lead role in projects with a focus on creating intuitive, inclusive and accessible design solutions.  Your work will include designing holistic services that work for a wide range of people, and the design of digital products and supporting the digital design team and wider disciplines to embrace the importance of accessible interaction design.  Your work will require collaboration across our user centered disciplines and go beyond the screen.  You will design in the open, leading the communication of design decisions within the project team and clients, championing the importance of design and user needs.  You’ll relish working closely with our clients and partners, supporting our approach to new business opportunities, and in co-designing services and products with users.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to jobs.snook@wearesnook.com with the title “Hire me: Senior Interaction Designer”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours. [post_title] => Senior Interaction Designer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => senior-interaction-designer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-02 15:02:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-02 15:02:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19308 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19307 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 14:44:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 14:44:55 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As a Senior User Researcher at Snook, you will lead and participate in multidisciplinary project teams and will be responsible for ensuring our design projects are rooted in a deep understanding of users and their needs. Your work will include designing and delivering a range of research activities and methods, and communicating actionable insights to project teams and clients.  Your work will require collaboration across our user-centered disciplines and go beyond the screen.  You will work in the open, communicating the research findings within the project team and clients, championing the importance of user research and user needs.  You’ll relish working closely with our clients and partners in co-designing services and products with users. You will work with the Head of User Research and the Head of Design to grow and develop our user research practice across Snook’s studios and our partners.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however, all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to jobs@wearesnook.com with the title “Hire me: Senior User Researcher”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.  [post_title] => Senior User Researcher [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => senior-user-researcher [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-05-28 13:21:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-05-28 13:21:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19307 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19293 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 14:42:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 14:42:52 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As a User Researcher at Snook, you will work in multidisciplinary project teams and will be responsible for ensuring our design projects are rooted in a deep understanding of users and their needs. Your work will include participating in a range of research activities and methods, and communicating actionable insights to project teams.  Your work will require collaboration across our user-centered disciplines and go beyond the screen.  You will work in the open, communicating the user research findings within the project team and with clients. You’ll relish working closely with our clients and partners in co-designing services and products with users.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to jobs.snook@wearesnook.com with the title “Hire me: User Researcher”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.  [post_title] => User Researcher [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => user-researcher [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-02 15:00:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-02 15:00:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19293 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19265 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 14:42:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 14:42:10 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As an Interaction Designer at Snook, you will be responsible for participating in projects with a focus on creating intuitive, inclusive and accessible design solutions.  Your work will include designing holistic services that work for a wide range of people, and the design of digital products and supporting the digital design team and wider disciplines to embrace the importance of accessible interaction design.  Your work will require collaboration across our user centered disciplines and go beyond the screen.  You will design in the open, communicating the design decisions within the project team and clients, championing the importance of design and user needs.  You’ll relish working closely with our clients and partners in co-designing services and products with users.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to jobs.snook@wearesnook.com with the title “Hire me: Interaction Designer”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours. [post_title] => Interaction Designer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => interaction-designer-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-02 15:03:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-02 15:03:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19265 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19238 [post_author] => 93 [post_date] => 2020-03-12 17:48:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-12 17:48:25 [post_content] => We're hiring at Snook - not just a few roles - lots of them. We’re looking to grow our team in a number of areas because we’ve got a big challenge on our hands.

Why is Snook here?

We’re on a mission to design a world where people and planet thrive. We think deep and look wide to transform the systems that shape our world. That means everything, everywhere – from exploring healthcare’s digital future to tearing down barriers to accessible transport. Bit by bit, we’re making our world more human – so everyone can thrive. We believe that when our world is built around people, it makes everyone happier, healthier, and more productive. Right now, parts of our world aren’t like that. They’re not designed for or with the people who live in them. This creates barriers that make life harder – from small, everyday experiences, to the bigger systems that shape our lives. We’re looking for people to help us make the world more accessible, more sustainable, more effective: more human.

What are we shooting for? Our 5 mission areas

Our missions are like shared dreams we are chasing. They are still in development but we’re crafting key questions that help us aim towards realising them. They are;

1. Thriving planet

2. Next-era government

3. Good business

4. Healthy lives

5. Communities for all

If all this sounds good to you, then come and join our team. We work both in the practical stabilising space (doing the hard work that needs to be done now to make things accessible in the current system) and the emergent space (thinking and articulating what a different system might look like in the future). Thanks to Cassie Robinson for her articulation of emergent models and roles.

What are we working on right now?

Who are we looking for?

We have lots of roles going as our team grows. We break down our roles into: Heads of - support the studio discipline and offer to grow  Principals - leading experts in their field with significant experience  Senior/Leads - experienced practitioners who can take a lead on projects Mid-weight - experienced practitioners Associate - entry level roles  We’re on the lookout for;

Delivery Managers

To support our design teams in delivering project outcomes and work with our amazing clients.  View our Delivery Manager job role.

Head of User Research

To grow and manage our user research team, building and developing our user research practice. View our Head of User Research job role.

User Researchers (entry level to senior) 

Looking for great researchers of all kinds with knowledge in the user research discipline and backgrounds in social sciences or experience in the field. View our User Researcher and Senior User Researcher job roles.

Head of Service Design

To grow and manage our team of service designers, building our practice in Service Design. View our Head of Service Design job role. 

Service Designer

We’re looking for people who are great at designing holistic services that work for a wide range of people. View our Service Designer job role.

Head of Digital 

To grow and manage our digital design team which consists of interaction, developers, technical leads, developers, building our practice in digital design. View our Head of Digital job role.

Content Designer

We need people who have experience of designing and testing language in the context of product and service design.  View our Content Designer job role.

Interaction Designer (entry level to senior) 

People who are great at designing accessible products and services, with a flair for great online experiences and a consideration for the user experience around them. View our Interaction Designer and Senior Interaction Designer job roles.

Digital Product Designer

Experienced designers who are great at shaping product and service direction to join our digital design team.  Job role details coming soon!

Technical Lead (senior/principal) 

A great all rounder who understands and has experience in technical development, data and enjoys unpicking complex challenges and can make simplifying complexity. Job role details coming soon!

Accessibility and Inclusion Design Lead and entry level/specialist 

People with a passion for products and services that are inclusive and accessible to all. We’re looking for people with specific experience in helping design and audit digital services that are WCAG 2.1 proficient but also go beyond this into considering inclusive design practices in all of our work View our Accessibility Specialist and Accessibility & Inclusive Design Lead job roles.

How does this all fit together?

We’re happy to share our organisation chart above. We’ve recognised a need for a new phase of growth which ensures we have a wider range of skills to meet the emergent needs of our clients and ensure we have the right support in place for our team by hiring heads of our disciplines to grow, nurture and train our teams.

How can I apply?

When our adverts go out they will specify requirements and skills for each role. But, we’re looking for a range of people and are open to all kinds of experience so please do apply.  If you’ve applied before, please do so again.  They will all be appearing on our jobs page and linked to this post as they go live. We recently overhauled our recruitment process to help ensure we’re building a diverse and inclusive team. Throughout the recruitment process, we’ll be providing applicants with any support they need. We actively encourage applications from a diverse range of backgrounds.  Please send your application to jobs@wearesnook.com with the title Hire me: Role Title (and your role you’re shooting for). All our jobs are advertised for at least 6 weeks but we are undertaking rolling recruitment so please do send in your applications. We will keep the posts open for as long as we need, to find the right people. [post_title] => We're hiring! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => were-hiring [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://wearesnook.com/inclusive-recruitment/ [post_modified] => 2020-04-17 14:02:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-04-17 14:02:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19238 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18414 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 11:08:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 11:08:27 [post_content] => She is a multidisciplinary designer with experience of various projects in diverse areas. As a service designer, Chia is motivated by helping people and solving the right problem with social impact, especially for vulnerable groups. Chia considers it crucial for her work to champion human rights, inclusivity, and accessibility. She is keen to learn new things, experience different cultures and travel. [post_title] => Chia Ying Tsai [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => chia-ying-tsai [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-03 11:08:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-03 11:08:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18414 [menu_order] => 33 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18553 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2019-11-15 21:03:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-15 21:03:15 [post_content] =>
How design patterns can help deliver better journeys across providers.
We sit in a no-man’s-land. The contested space for bikes, buggies, wheelchairs, bags and the occasional pet. A man who has just been wheeled on board asks if I can pass his bags. The attendant has left them out of reach and he needs to work. He is smartly dressed and makes this commute twice a week. He travels to the city for work on Mondays and returns home on Thursday for the weekend. The attendants often leave his bags out of reach. Sometimes they put them on his lap as they push him through the station. This hurts his legs. He jokes that today he is glad to be on board. Sometimes he is left in the waiting room, watching his train departure time come and go without anyone coming to help him on board. He is forgotten. Occasionally, Passenger Assist forget to take him off the train. He remains on board, travelling up and down the line until someone helps him. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1892"] Illustration by Julia Scheele[/caption] Over years of conducting user research on buses, trains and planes, we’ve heard far too many stories like this. The Deaf student who ended up stuck on a train back at the depot after the service terminated early. He missed the audio announcement, and no one thought to check if there were people still on the train. The woman with the broken pelvis waiting for nearly an hour for someone to come and help her carry her bags between the train and taxi. The autistic child who was distraught at having to change trains three times in one journey and not being able to sit in the same seat. Too often we find out that people with a range of mental health issues consider navigating public transport too stressful. Negative experiences like these often lead to people giving up on public transport, feeling safer and happier in private vehicles. This though further segregates them from society. Once people have invested in a car, they are unlikely to switch back. There is some great work being done by the likes of NeatboxWest Midlands Railway and others to overcome many barriers to travel for people with a range of physical and mental health needs. These stories and many more have several common features:

1. Problems that could be designed-out in advance

Most of the issues could have been planned or designed-out in advance, by involving users in the design process and testing prototypes with a range of people before implementation. From physical challenges like the poles on trains that prevent wheelchair passengers from passing, or digital signs with road names being placed behind the wheelchair seat on some buses. To more complex challenges like the autistic child wanting to sit in the same seat number for a rail journey.

2. Friction at boundaries

The majority of challenges also occur in the changes between transport modes and providers. Where transport providers have a support service, this often does not cover the end-to-end passenger journey, only the part provided by that organisation. Providers need to help their customers reach their destination. This highlights a key opportunity for Mobility as a Service (MaaS) concepts to better connect multiple modes and create an easier journey for passengers with accessibility needs.
[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1892"] Illustration by Julia Scheele[/caption]

3. Human error and misunderstanding

Things go wrong with human interactions, often unintentionally and due to a lack of awareness. The heavy bags that were placed on the wheelchair user’s lap, the driver who announced the train termination over audio without realising there may be a Deaf passenger on board. All of the stories are everyday journeys that people should be able to make easily and without unnecessary stress. This suggests that staff roles need redesigning to provide a great experience. Ensuring all customer-facing staff have the right training, such as specific disability awareness and mental health first aid. Enough time to help people and treat them as individuals, emphasis on empathy as a job requirement, permission to be flexible when necessary. Research is also needed into the organisational processes and rules that are causing the current challenges.
[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1892"] Illustration by Julia Scheele[/caption]
 
We need to design services that meet the needs of people with both physical and mental health requirements. And this needs to be across all transport services, not just special apps that work in certain areas or for one provider.

Design patterns for accessible and inclusive transport

Service design patterns offer a great opportunity to create more accessible transport services. Design patterns stem from architectural practice, such as making sure steps on stairs are equally spaced for ease of walking. They have since been applied in the service design world by GDSProjects by If and here at Snook to ensure consistent experiences for users across multiple services. Defining accessible design patterns for transport services would enable all providers to adapt their services to meet a range of needs, without each provider having to conduct specific research or design individual apps. Good service experiences go far beyond apps and design patterns could be used for better experiences at stations, planning travel, face-to-face with staff and over the phone. Furthermore, a set of standards would help hold providers to account when things go wrong or fall beneath an acceptable level. At Snook, we want to develop service design patterns for accessible transport as part of our mission to help deliver better, more human-centred travel. We are looking for partners and are exploring funding options, so if you are interested in working together get in touch! Email curious@wearesnook.com with the subject line Design Patterns for Accessible Travel.
[post_title] => Design patterns for accessible transport [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => service-design-patterns-for-accessible-transport [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://wearesnook.com/mobility-as-a-service/ [post_modified] => 2019-12-03 22:51:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-03 22:51:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=18553 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [12] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11064 [post_author] => 19 [post_date] => 2016-03-18 10:09:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-03-18 10:09:55 [post_content] => I spent two days at Camp Digital: from 16-17 March 2016 in Manchester. It explored current ideas and perspectives within the user experience, design and digital communities. During this, I gained a better understanding of how to design for digital with a service focused lens. So, what happened?

Say yes to sketching

The first day was spent attending two pre-conference workshops: ‘Sketching: Thinking, Communication and Design’ with Francis Rowland and ‘Designing digital products for kids’ with Karina Ibarra from Arquinata. As we grow older, we tend to become more self-critical about our own sketching and drawing abilities. With some simple sketching activities with Francis, I regained a greater sense of confidence in putting down my pen on paper. There is great value in being able to present, critique and get feedback through quick sketches between teams. The more you do it, the more your confidence grows and you feel more comfortable doing it. The workshop inspired me to try something new: to sketchnote all the conference talks. Camp Digital

On your mark, get set, go

The second workshop shared kid’s cognitive principles for the different age groups. They were then applied in a design sprint where we were to design a classic toy into digital product in 70 minutes. It was a fast-paced experience that condensed a typical 5-day sprint in a little over an hour.

Digital Superheroes

The conference day started with great energy as Julie Dodd shared what digital superheroes look like. Digital superheroes use technology for good. They design to really help people, are smart about using existing tools, not afraid to try things in new ways and are everywhere. We can all be digital superheroes.

Co-designing works

Another key learning was the idea of digital not about being a concrete thing. It is about “applying the culture, practices, processes and technologies of the Internet era to respond to people’s raised expectations,” as expressed by Tom Loosemore, Digital Services Director from The Co-operative Group. Digital should not be about creating more products. It is about designing an experience with the involvement, interactions and needs of people in mind. Many of the talks highlighted common patterns. User experience design is nothing without research. It is valuable to involve stakeholders in user testing and journey mapping. Test, iterate, repeat. If you design for accessibility, you design for everyone.

Be adaptable, be patient

Design and technology is also always in constant flux. We might know something today but tomorrow it may become irrelevant and that’s okay. We need to be adaptable. This is so true for the web and what we do – it changes all the time. 

UX with a service lens

Sketchnoting all seven talks was fun and helped visualise what was learned as it was being absorbed. It was a different and active way of capturing and making sense of information. And this is what we do at Snook by bringing in a service design lens to our digital work. We put users at the core: we codesign with stakeholders and involve them in the process. We help our clients understand how their organisation works and can support digital to ensure the work we do is going to help the people we design for. We are all on the paths of becoming digital superheroes and that’s inspiring. [post_title] => Camp Digital | Let’s all be digital superheroes [post_excerpt] => I spent two days at Camp Digital: from 16-17 March 2016 in Manchester. It explored current ideas and perspectives with the user experience, design and digital communities. Here's my highlights. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => camp-digital-2016 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=11064 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [13] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11050 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2016-03-14 13:34:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-03-14 13:34:34 [post_content] => When I was 20 years old, I was given the opportunity as a designer to enter the public sector. I went inside the machine and was confused about why we weren't designing services the same way we made chairs: people first, understanding our materials, testing iteratively before the final production. Quite the opposite in fact, we were doing to people not for. Top down, prescriptive policy and delivering services as process charts; expecting people to use what we'd created. During this period, I became fascinated by how Government and public services work (and don't work) and where design principles (and designers) could add value. Working as a public servant, developing digital public services back from 2007-10, I undertook a Masters focusing on mapping design across the public sector and how policy moves from the strategy unit to the services we see. This period pre-dated initiatives such as Government Digital Service and many of the innovation labs that were being set up by public sector/government. It was an exciting time and a very new concept that had been brewing for many years before I came to it. I was lucky to become one of a new cohort of designers entering the public sector to redesign services. I built on practice like Sophia Parker’s innovation labs in Kent County Council, leaders in the field like Futuregov and Engine who were launching 'The journey to the interface' and the innovation bodies like Nesta who were discussing Co-production, user led innovation and innovation for public services.

Service Design in Government

In 2014, I gave the Keynote at Service Design in Government. My brief from the organisers was to talk simply through the tools of Service Design, methods and some practical case studies. Having been in the field for a fair bit of time already, we wanted to see service design progressing to hit the mainstream, but we weren't quite there yet. I knew this was a ‘basics’ presentation, getting people behind the mindset of creating people-centred services that work end-to-end across public and government services. Fast forward 3 years and I’m standing alongside our client Camilla Buchanan from the Cabinet Office with Cassie Robinson of The Point People who were our collaborators on the Designing Social Investment project and report.
Designing Social Investment - Cabinet Office UK, Snook & The Point People We're talking openly about researching the needs of users in the social investment field, what we're discovering, how we're creating guiding principles for the sector to be led by the Cabinet Office and how we're prototyping new products and services for the social investment marketplace. We're talking side by side, honestly and openly exploring the challenges of where design is supporting development of better informed policy. In fact, other agencies like Live|Work are talking alongside Department for Health and Us Creates with NHS England. This is an exciting time. A really really exciting time with huge potential to get this right. But we need to keep pushing! I can feel it again. It has been a really hard slog talking the same process and ideas for years but you know what? We are getting somewhere. SDinGov 2016 was a great testament to this. It's conferences like this that are like a mirror, they play back to you the progress that's been made. It's easy to get beaten down, or feel like the same message has been playing for years. Believe me it has, and long before I was in the industry or even studying; but it's exciting to see it being put into action. I think there were more people from across government and public sector bodies presenting than practice-based designers.

Here are my key takeaways

There are exceptional standards of practice and structures being developed at the highest level Government Digital Service is gaining huge traction and their approach is spreading to other bodies. Their exceptional service manual outlines savings produced, an approach to user needs first, end-to-end service design, service standards, service pattern talk and fantastic work from Alistair Duggin on accessibility. Whilst it’s got a digital focus, they're now embedding the foundations and platforms to scale this across all of Government. And other bodies are embedding design too (UKTI, Ministry of Justice, Home Office). It is fantastic to finally see such a united approach to getting service basics right. Service redesign and meeting needs is about designing the organisation I've shared widely Ben Holliday's post on fixing broken windows. Ben is right – successful companies put design at the centre of everything they do. Everything in your organisation should be designed to work for people: on the inside and outside from onboarding process to communication systems and data sets making the service work. Service is everyone's and everything's business What was great to hear Louise Downe, Head of Design at GDS, pointing out is that we're approaching all of this through a service design lenses. She explained that they're not just redesigning forms, or a digital interface, they're looking at everything that makes for a better service: from CSS codes and making sure text is readable by assistive technology, to the loading time on screen, the way we name services and the data sets they're cleaning up.
There is an emergent common language There was a common language being used. This is great. If we have the foundations in place about putting people first and end-to-end journeys, we can begin to build the platforms and structures we need in place to make this a reality. We are all figuring this out - and in the open It felt like everyone was honest, and sharing both their successes and failures, live on stage. This is a principle of a design-led approach, critical debate on the right thing to do and why certain decisions are made. Governments were using hackpads, open Google Docs and Wikis to document learnings and ideas. Agencies and clients were listing how they could better work together now they'd partnered. This might seem simple, but having gone to quite a few industry events where there's often a focus on show pieces, this is really refreshing. We need traction across local government, third sector and commissioning scenarios The above points aren't always true across all of the named fields. There are some fantastic examples out there and guys like Bexley Council are doing some good work but it would be good to hear more from other Local Authorities about what they're doing and see them take part. I know from our work, that sometimes it is a struggle to communicate the value of service design to Local Authorities, particularly when there seems to be a disconnect in terms of a common language or mindset. The barriers to making this happen are often political and complex. Conflicting drivers impact on commissioners, such as moves towards provider market places and citizens being considered as more demanding consumers of services (i.e to get your passport, you can apply to one place and one place only). There is a huge job to do here and a large systems piece... The larger systems piece to consider around design  The public office, and others, picked up on Systems thinking which is taking a role in this, particularly around the local authority service design discussion. In the complex environment of multi-stakeholder delivery, we really need to take a systems approach to consider how we commission services in this arena. This will involve up-skilling Councils to think differently about service delivery and information provision, and move away from the big 'I.T transformation programmes'. We need more of a conversation around the ethics and practice of codesign and research  I can't enthuse enough about the brilliant work of Katherine Garzonis on desinging with mental health service users and Liana Dragoman / Yasmin Fodal on the complexities of designing with and for vulnerable populations. Both brought nuances in how we should approach research, retelling the journeys of people and how we characterise their stories. We've got much work to do here in creating some accessible ethics and training across education on this. We are at another exciting period of development but the job is bigger than we expected There's lot to do, and I think we've got a serious skills gap. It seems nearly every public body and government department is advertising for people to come and work on this. We really need to scale up our training and experience in doing this kind of work. For me – I'm committed to an 'outsider' role after being on the inside of public services. I believe I have more impact from this position, supporting organisations to think differently about what they're doing and building their capacity to do it themselves. And this is something we have done and continue to do. We're talking more and more about supporting organisations to build design capacity rather than doing the design work ourselves; and this has always been the ethos of our agency. However, there's a role for everyone here: from outsiders to insiders in government and public services. We need to keep working together and sharing our insights and stories. Thanks Service Design in Government! I genuinely left this year feeling powered up and positive. We've got a long way to go but we're certainly heading in the right direction.
[post_title] => Service Design in Government | Designing Social Investment [post_excerpt] => Thanks Service Design in Government! I genuinely left this year feeling powered up and positive. We've got a long way to go but we're certainly heading in the right direction. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sdingov-2016 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=11050 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [14] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1556 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-07-29 11:33:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-29 11:33:55 [post_content] => Edinburgh Festivals are some of the finest cultural experiences in the world and we are working with them to explore what they can learn from Service Design. We are working closely with the Festivalslab; a unique programme of work which identifies and develops ways to improve the world's festival city - for audiences, for artists, for partners and for the festival organisations themselves. The project kicked off with a basic introduction to how Service Design tools are relevant to designing festival experiences as services. We spent the afternoon with the Science Festival Team - including the development manager, the business director, the marketing manager, the generation science manager and the deputy director. Initially, we carried out small exploration exercises focused on seeing the world differently. Participants tried to book a festival ticket online and simultaneously wrote down a list of fifty things to capture the experience. This was very simple yet revealed key insights into the experience of booking a festival ticket online: the site never shows me an alternative, I want to give up and phone, why do I need to create an account? why do they need so much information? why can't you book tickets through the mobile application? Participants described these exploration tools as a "great chance to think virtually". One tool was designed to encourage thought experiments whilst walking around a public space. This resulted in metaphors around accessibility ; the festival offers multiple messages for multiple customers, and this metaphor encouraged thinking around who chooses what at what point. Why do people choose the events they do and how can we understand this better? We spent time exploring personas as a way to provide the team with different perspectives on the services they offer. After building up clear pictures of typical characters who do engage with the festival the team created their own personas of people who do not engage with the service. This exercise revealed assumptions around how and why people engage with the festival: "People decide they want to buy a ticket before hand and then invest a long time in booking". Creating personas sparked off interesting debate around the barriers to engagement and how people seek advice and recommendations around what event to attend and why. We then took these personas through a typical customer journey. This revealed lots of opportunities for innovation such as getting to and from events and the contrast between the touchpoints of an adults festivals experience to that of a child. Relevance is a big theme for the festival staff and they are clearly facing all the challenges that come with moving away from traditional science education to a more modern representation of science. As well as balancing the breadth and depth of their program they are focusing on helping people navigate their festival. We discussed key questions such as: How can we build communities and loyalties throughout the year with all stakeholders? How can we truly combat the stigma of science? How can we actively seek out the voices of our audiences? We are really excited about this project. In it's small way it may very well be another revolution in how the cultural sector innovates in the UK. We intend to bring design thinking and doing to the festivals and showcase the notion of seeing festivals as service experiences. [post_title] => Service Design for the festivals [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => service-design-for-the-festivals [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1556 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 15 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19295 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 14:43:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 14:43:11 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

Our accessibility specialists champion inclusive design and accessibility across everything Snook does from the products we build to the services we offer.  The role focuses on ensuring what we are designing and building is inclusive and accessible to people who will use it.  At Snook we talk about inclusive design overall, that making things accessible isn’t just about websites, but overall is the service that is designed accessible to everyone who might use it.  You’ll relish working closely with our clients and partners and in co-designing services and products with users.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to jobs.snook@wearesnook.com with the title “Hire me: Accessibility Specialist”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours. [post_title] => Accessibility Specialist [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => accessibility-specialist [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-02 15:03:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-02 15:03:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19295 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 15 [max_num_pages] => 1 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => 1 [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 07321bdf446538bf6dbac4c49a081570 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => about [1] => an [2] => are [3] => as [4] => at [5] => be [6] => by [7] => com [8] => for [9] => from [10] => how [11] => in [12] => is [13] => it [14] => of [15] => on [16] => or [17] => that [18] => the [19] => this [20] => to [21] => was [22] => what [23] => when [24] => where [25] => who [26] => will [27] => with [28] => www ) [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

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