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The team will be working with Katy Arnold, Deputy Director for Design and Research at the Home Office and her excellent research and design teams. We’ve long been fans of the HO Digital Blog. We’ll be supporting them with capabilities in design and working on a range of their portfolio projects. This is a significant partnership for Snook with the Home Office, over two years, working on the inside of Government to design and deliver critical services that are used by the whole population. 11 years ago, Snook first walked through the doors of the Home Office with a new product we were developing - MyPolice, the UK’s first online feedback tool which we successfully launched in Scotland. Since then we’ve worked on projects helping housing organisations consider the journey of asylum seekers, worked with senior policy makers on security and worked with operatives in control rooms to design the software and services that manages 999 calls. It's a big landmark for us and we can't wait to get started.   [post_title] => Home Office + Snook [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => home-office-and-snook [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-09 09:25:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-09 09:25:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19191 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19016 [post_author] => 91 [post_date] => 2019-12-19 12:54:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-19 12:54:39 [post_content] => We turned 10, so we’ve been celebrating and reflecting on everything we’ve learnt along the way. And of course, we’re always looking forward - thinking about how we’ll build for the next 10 years.  Firstly, we became part of the Northgate Public Services family. This move gives Snook the opportunity not only to scale as a company but to scale our impact. From discovery to build, Snook is now positioned to go deeper into projects and work on large scale services from national policing and control rooms to the benefits system.  We also went through a strategic re-brand. This wasn’t about just designing a new logo. We wanted to find new ways to talk about and re-define our purpose. It's allowed us to better articulate why we’re here and act as the starting point for defining our missions and culture.  We’ve worked on too many projects to write something about all of them. So we’ve cherry-picked some highlights here, aligned with our mission areas. We hope they convey something of the breadth and depth of our work and our commitment to making the world more human.

Thriving Planet

In April, after an inspiring Design on the Inside (DOTI) event, about sustainable environmental action, we set up the Design+Climate Community.  The aim is to work collaboratively with the wider community of designers and related disciplines to develop ways of considering the environment at every stage of the design process. We've started in Glasgow and London and are looking for people to host in cities and towns across the world next year. If you’re interested in joining us and seeing what we can do together, click here. We’re currently working with Climate-KIC, supporting them to develop and test their ideas for organisation design as they reorganise around their new mission. Design-led approaches have played an important role in making sure they have the internal functions and structure that will enable them to continue delivering important climate innovation work. DOTI Fest 2019 was a platform for honest, system-wide conversation and collaboration which was designed to embody our commitment to environmental awareness. We wanted to walk the walk, not just talk the talk, so as well as lining up a whole day of amazing speakers, workshops, forums and fun we made sure that everything from the breakfast pastries to the name tags and decorations was sourced zero-waste, recycled and reusable. [caption id="attachment_18885" align="aligncenter" width="578"]People discussing something at DOTI Fest 2019 DOTI Fest 2019[/caption]

Next-era Government

In April we led a discovery with OpenCommunity, a group of local authorities pioneering data standards for community services. Off the back of our research, there are now 10 councils actively piloting implementing the standards to help people find services that help them live a fair, healthy and equal life.  A great example of the Local Digital Declaration to #fixtheplumbing in action. The real benefits and savings of standards adoption will come from improved availability and quality of data about community services. Better access could play an important role in preventative health and social care. People have joked that digital should be the basis of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs – over food, water, shelter, and warmth – but in fact, there is evidence that people do prioritise connectivity over essentials and comfort. The importance that refugees attach to owning a mobile phone is a reminder of that. As more public services go online, digital exclusion is expected to drive inequality gaps. We worked with the Scottish government on a report which concludes that the seamless integration of digital and human engagement is essential as Scottish public services expand.

Good Business

We’ve been working with a global company that delivers around 100 services in areas ranging from defence contracts to leisure facilities. They wanted to improve the catering service they provide to large institutions like schools, hospitals and universities. We focused on a higher education college in the UK, conducting research and co-design with students and the client. We’ve come up with prioritised recommendations based on feasibility and the areas that align with their business plan. Like the work we're doing with Climate-KIC, the focus on enabling them to adopt user-centred design as the way they do business as usual is key. We help organisations to develop these capabilities in-house.

Healthy Lives

We’ve worked on several projects that address the impact on young people’s health of poverty and the increased demand for mental health support.  Not all of those eligible to receive free school meals actually get them. We worked with pupils in Scotland to understand their experiences of school lunches whilst also seeing how the Child Poverty (Scotland) 2017 Act gets implemented on the ground. Ultimately we wanted to see how we could make a difference - effectively working to flip the benefits model on its head by bringing services to people instead of waiting for people to come to services.  Meanwhile, in London, we worked with Hammersmith and Fulham to address the impact of food poverty on children and young people. We went out to communities and engaged with local volunteers, residents and children to research, co-design solutions and start building an alliance. We’re now working to explore how these ideas can be delivered in practice and to ensure the alliance continues to flourish after the project. In order to tackle the root causes, we’re supporting staff in children’s services to connect with other parts of the council to harness existing resources and explore how to improve the whole system response. We’re working in partnership with Barnado’s and Public Policy Lab to develop a library of best-practice guidance for developing digital mental health products for young people. This is part of the recently launched #RESET online Mental Health funding Programme. We’re thrilled to have partners to go on an open and exploratory journey, to build something new that we hope will ensure that young people can access effective support when they have difficulties with mental health.  We’ve done a lot of work around mental health over the years, so in the spirit of putting our own oxygen masks on first, we also trained the whole Snook team in both studios to become Mental Health First Aiders.

Communities for All 

One of the ways in which communities thrive is in the work of many volunteer organisations run by and for members of the public in their spare time. This year we achieved a long-held ambition to work with the Scouts! They asked us to look at improving the adult volunteering experience and we sent members of our team out to meet with people all over the UK, often at weekends (because that’s when volunteers are doing their thing). We learnt that Scouts the energy and enthusiasm that drives people to volunteer can lead to burnout or feeling under-appreciated in the end.  We’re currently prototyping solutions to explain the realities of volunteering, open the communication within the Scouts community and help Scouts feel recognised. We’ve been working with Renfrewshire Council, in partnership with Dartington Service Design Lab and funded by the Life Changes Trust, to ensure all young people in care have their voices heard. We've worked with them all the way from user research and co-design through to testing and implementation. Research with young people revealed that good conversations are key enablers for many important decisions in a young person’s care experience. We’re now building a framework to improve the quality of conversations and will be testing a shared resource, co-designed with young people and practitioners to improve care experiences from early 2020. Another great experience of being involved in creating a fully built service from research to delivery was with Hackney Council. After finding out that over 50% of applications fail, we worked with them to design and launch a new digital service for household planning applications. We met with planners, citizens and housing experts to understand their needs. In alpha, we developed a series of recommendations and prototypes, designing an end-to-end service using the GDS Design System. In beta, we’ve designed a new data-led service and re-worked the user experience to include dynamic forms to make the submission process easier and effective. 

The next decade is about systems 

As you can see from above, no one project we run is simply a ‘health’ or an ‘environmental’ challenge. As Dahlgren and Whitehead pointed out, your health is connected to your socioeconomic level. Many issues are determined by economic factors or the environment. When we talk about designing a world where people and planet thrive, we recognise this isn’t the challenge of one organisation alone, but a systems challenge. Our new missions are purposefully wide and we’re proud of that. We want to work across systems in the next decade, working with multiple partners who connect together to build alliances that will tackle the tough inequalities and human and planetary health problems that exist today.  We’re here for that. If that sounds like something you want to do - get in touch, we’re planning out 2020 and beyond as we type.  But for now, 2019 has been an epic adventure. We’ve grown in size and impact and are so excited about what we can achieve. 2020 will see both the London and Glasgow offices moving to new premises. We’ve got big plans to do even more with DOTI (watch this space) and tons of exciting project work coming in.  But now it’s time to turn off the laptop and have a well-earned break. We hope you’ll be enjoying a relaxing, joyful, harmonious holiday and look forward to seeing you in the New Year. See you in January 2020!   [post_title] => Snook 2019: A year in review [post_excerpt] => From co-designing services and training charities to sustainability and our 10th year as Snook - these are our highlights of 2018. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-2019-year-review [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://wearesnook.com/design-like-theres-a-climate-crisis/ https://wearesnook.com/free-school-meals/ https://wearesnook.com/sharing-knowledge-to-build-better-mental-health-services/ https://wearesnook.com/put-oxygen-mask-helping-others/ [post_modified] => 2020-01-17 13:00:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-01-17 13:00:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=19016 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18402 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 00:33:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 00:33:00 [post_content] =>

Snook was founded 10 years ago this December. Sarah Drummond reflects over nearly a decade of great work, and where we want to be in the future.

We’re stronger now than ever before. We have a full portfolio of work for the year, doing the things we love best — working on some of the most significant Scottish and UK Government programmes around.

Over the years we’ve grown a team of over thirty in Scotland and London and recently, we have brought in more support roles to make it easier for great work to happen.

This year more than any other, Snook has hit its stride, and we’ve finally been able to take a step back and ask ourselves — how can we make an even bigger impact in the world?

Snook was founded on a mission to scale the design capability of the public sector and to make it more user-centered.

So many things have happened since the early incarnation of those principles, embodied in the slightly questionable poster above.

We have trained thousands of people and delivered hundreds of live products and services that have touched the lives of people across the world.

There are too many to list, but over the years we’ve helped Samaritans design ways for people to improve their mental health, supported Neighbourhood Watch to help older people facing fraud, worked with the NHS to redesign A+E, created new national care services with the Scottish Government, worked with housing providers to support vulnerable tenants, helped local authorities commission new homeless systems and launched award-winning platforms supporting young people to prepare for the world of work — to name just a few.

Alongside this, we’ve released our own products that improve the world in areas we’re passionate about. From CycleHack, an award-winning initiative to overcome the barriers to cycling in 50 global cities, to Dearest Scotland, a snapshot of the referendum which culminated in a book of letters written by citizens to the future of the country.

In recent years, we’ve pushed the design industry to be more accessible by running initiatives and events on inclusive recruitment and inclusive design. We also started ‘Design On The Inside’ a set of events, conferences and (soon to be) podcasts. It shares the knowledge of designers who work inside large organisations and furthers our mission of increasing in-house design capability.

We are beyond proud of the work we’ve done. I’m eternally grateful for the people who’ve employed us, and even more for those we’ve worked with. We are now hooked on the same mission — we want to design a world that’s more human.

 

So where now?

All of this is a huge achievement, especially for a studio that’s only been around for 10 years — but the world is changing.

Our mission is still the same as it was, but how we deliver it today needs to be different. The market and its needs are changing. I’ve been open and honest about my scepticism of the traditional design studio model in meeting the new demands and needs of the Government, our NHS and the wider public sector.

In the past five years, we’ve seen countless service design projects (both our own and those of other agencies) struggle to get delivered through consultancy, and it can be unsatisfying for both the team and the organisation investing in them.

We’ve also noticed an increase in the number of technology companies with product oriented models being awarded work by designing multi-channel services. This is generally being done without having the in-house skills to undertake the work, or expertise to build capabilities of organisations, leading to badly designed services and unsustainable delivery models.

“We need the NHS’s staff and patients to benefit from this talent [in the marketplace] and we need this talent to see the NHS as a brilliant market for their innovation.

The new NHSX CEO, Mathew Gould summarised what the market needs far more succinctly than I could. For organisations supporting the NHS to deliver world class health services to work differently, he said; “We need the NHS’s staff and patients to benefit from this talent [in the marketplace] and we need this talent to see the NHS as a brilliant market for their innovation. All this means a clear approach — creating the platform for digital innovation and creating the standards that will allow that innovation to plug in safely. It means not competing against the market and resisting the urge to build or commission everything ourselves”

We are facing a reality where government, the public sector and many other large organisations have and will become platforms on which products and services are built. To do this we need open, ethical organisations who can take on this challenge, build real partnerships with these organisations and build their capability so that they are able to deliver these services sustainably.

More importantly, these organisations need to be able to make these partnerships well in the first place, and that means rapidly increasing their capability in design, from policy downwards.

The route of delivery

Right now, Snook simply doesn’t have the scale to be able to do this on our own. This is why we’ve chosen to take Snook to the next level by integrating with a partner that can help us achieve this mission.

There are two main options open to agencies looking to do this — work with a large consultancy firm, as so many other agencies have done, or work with a delivery one.

We chose delivery for all of the reasons I talked about above. The strategy, after all, is delivery — not more strategy.

Our exciting news

I’m excited to announce today that the partner we’ve chosen to join with is Northgate Public Services (NPS).

What we needed to find was an organisation who had a deep expertise, knowledge and platform for scaled delivery. That’s what NPS has.

If you don’t know NPS, they have helped to screen more than 10 million babies for hearing loss, maintained over 21 million people on the NHS Organ Donor Register, provided 50% of police forces in the UK with vital frontline information and supported 150 social housing providers to deliver efficient services to tenants across the globe.

They have the scale and technology, we have expertise in user centred-design that they want to bring deeply into their products.

This move marks a change in both the pathways of Snook and NPS. For Snook, this means scaling the level of delivery we’re able to offer, and for NPS, this means becoming a design-centred, user-led organisation.

The design studio model of yesterday is in danger of becoming obsolete for the type of capabilities the sector is calling for, and we want to ensure we’re listening to the patterns we’ve witnessed.

For me, this integration is about both Snook and NPS creating the type of organisation a 21st-century public sector needs in order to deliver great services.

Part of this means accelerating the independent initiatives we’ve started, like our work on inclusive recruitment, our Design Patterns for Mental Healththe User Research Library and Design on the Inside.

Working with NPS will provide us with the ability to invest in building these platforms in the open, with an aim to support wider sectors for good beyond our own work.

We don’t see this as ‘tacking’ design on, this is about fully integrating user-centered design into the heart of a delivery organisation that can not only innovate but sustain and maintain delivery.

What’s next?

Firstly, it’s important to say, Snook isn’t changing.

Our mission, name and services won’t change. We’re committed to continue the work we’ve been doing and will work with NPS to build a shared capability in Service Design, transformation and delivery.

We will still have our studios in Glasgow and London, and continue to invest in the skill development and pathways of our team to grow and hone their talent.

We are however growing, and we will be hiring.

We will be developing our skills and offer in digital product design and transformation more deeply by integrating our teams together.

We want to go beyond our client expectations and set the vision of what great looks like, and we can now do this at scale. There are a number of critical things we want to ensure happens in our work together with NPS;

  • All the services we design, past and present, consider user needs first, building services that work first time for those who need them
  • We live in a world where services work inter operably, exploring how our platforms can be open to enable this
  • Ensuring all of our products and services are accessible
  • Developing critical thought on user data

Further to this, we have always advocated for preventative models of care and service. With scale and data, we can begin to explore and test preventative health and care models and explore how to ethically bring these to life in the sector.

To make sure that all of these things get delivered, I’m going to support Snook in a new role as Chief Digital Officer for NPS, and join the executive team at Northgate. I’m excited to be operating at this scale and set the pace for a company to develop deep capabilities in Service Design and human-centered design.

Opportunities like this don’t come along often, and when they do, you know it’s right. I’m proud of Snook past and present who have taken us to this stage, and even more excited about what the future holds.

You can read the NPS press release here.

You can read my personal blog on the last ten years of Snook here.

It goes without saying, there are some people who I owe dear thank-yous to for being part of the Snook journey to date:

Lauren Currie — Co-founder with me at Snook who I shared many laughs and cries with for the first half of the Snook journey.

Cassie Robinson — A dear friend, confident and board member who helped Lauren and I start up Snook in the first place.

The early crew — Andy Young and Kirsty Joan Sinclair who really solidified the early portfolio of Snook.

Our first project ALISS — Peter Ashe, Christine Hoy, Andy Hyde who we shared our first project with and invested a whole lot of love into bringing people together to design a system to support people with Long Term Conditions.

Glasgow School of Art — In particular Gordon Hush who’s been a long time support and let us set up an office in the art school for our first six months and Irene Macara McWilliams who made me think hard during my masters year.

Open Change — Known as Mike Press and Hazel White who supported us during the early days and continue to be great friends in the world to build more design in Scotland.

Our board — Stuart McDonald and Scott Cain who have provided fantastic support and asked the hard questions of me.

My partner Lou — Who has shared the joys and the pain of this bumpy ride for the past four years and helped keep me sane, without Lou, I’d have given up.

Friends and family — There are FAR too many of you to mention, but you know who you are. Thanks for supporting this first part of the ride.

All of the Snook team and extended family — Snook is nothing without team and I’m eternally grateful you’ve joined the journey for however long or short in our mission. You know who you are and there are too many to name individually that would favour anyone, so a deepest thank you.

Valerie Carr — My longest standing Snook, super mum and all round fantastic role model. Thank you for standing by me and continuing to invest so much of yourself into what we do at Snook.

Simon Smith — Our strategy director who’s really supported me in turning the company around in the last year by investing so much time internally to get our wheels turning smoothly and helping to make this move happen.

NPS, and Steve — for making this an easily smooth ride. It’s been a pleasure this far and we’re looking forward to working with you.

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[post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => tesco-and-snook-celebrate-their-one-year-anniversary [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=16080 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15579 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2017-12-20 14:10:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-20 14:10:58 [post_content] => [post_title] => Snook 2017 : A year in review [post_excerpt] => Have a peek at what Snook has been up to in 2017 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-2017-year-review [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=15579 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15391 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2017-11-01 16:44:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-01 16:44:35 [post_content] => [post_title] => Snook visits Spain for SDN 2017 [post_excerpt] => Sarah will be in Madrid speaking at the Service Design conference, 2017. Here’s a sneak peek at what to expect and how you can get involved. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-visits-spain-sdn-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=15391 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14796 [post_author] => 29 [post_date] => 2017-06-30 09:14:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-30 09:14:39 [post_content] => [post_title] => Me, Myself, and Snook [post_excerpt] => Connor has been part of our team as a graphic designer. Read about his Snook journey! [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => connor-and-snook [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=14796 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14495 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2017-04-12 14:15:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-12 14:15:57 [post_content] => [post_title] => The monthly Snook logo hack [post_excerpt] => Every month, a member of our team hacks the Snook logo into something fun. This month, it was Sarah’s turn. And here’s what she did. 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[post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => renfrewshire-council-snook [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=14179 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [13] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13861 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2016-11-24 09:39:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-11-24 09:39:22 [post_content] => [post_title] => From East to West Coast | Snook in the U.S.A [post_excerpt] => Innovation, design and co-operatives: From Platform Co-operativism to NYC Mayor's office design team, to Timbuk2 (San Fran) with CycleHack [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-in-usa [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=13861 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [14] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13728 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2016-10-28 11:21:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-28 11:21:08 [post_content] => [post_title] => Join the Snook team! [post_excerpt] => *UPDATE* we have now hired new talent... We were on the lookout for new talent to join Glasgow and London teams. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => join-snook-team [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=13728 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [15] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13597 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2016-10-17 10:38:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-17 10:38:08 [post_content] =>
Over the next two days, we are going to be in Brussels with the European Commission bringing together policy labs under the header of ‘Lab Connection. We’re excited to have been invited by the UK’s Policy Lab from the Cabinet Office.
Lab Connection is a first in its kind when it comes to gathering policy labs, EU policymakers and public authorities from across Europe.

It’s not just talks

The labs from across the EU are working together to look at and consider where labs best add value on societal challenges, and how.
I’m going to be supporting to facilitate some of the sessions over the day, focussing on young people and also digital rights/development in EU countries.
I’m interested to find out more about how policy and delivery can better work together to ensure a flow of insight from the frontline workers - including true autonomy with the frontline of our services and systems to re-design as we deliver. How can policy best serve this future idea?
We’re also going to be showcasing our collaborative lab, Systems Changers that we have been running with The Point People, commissioned by Lankelly Chase Foundation.

Systems Changers

Systems Changers is a Networked Lab that connects the insights of frontline workers across the public and voluntary sector into policy-making. The Labs include frontline workers, their organisations (whether that be the NHS, Local Government or a local charity) and the people that access their services. Started in 2014 as a partnership between the Point People, Snook and Lankelly Chase, the programme was initially designed to ask:
Can, and how can, the insights of frontline workers influence systems change?
Now in its second year, the programme is focussed solely on the ‘how’. The network of frontline workers participating in Systems Changers is increasing with each new programme and a platform is being designed so insights from the frontline can continually feed into how services and systems are shaped.
You can follow my two days via #Policylab4EU
[post_title] => Snook at the EU Policy Lab Gathering [post_excerpt] => We are going to be in Brussels with the European Commission bringing together policy labs under the header of ‘Lab Connection. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-eu-policy-lab-gathering [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=13597 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [16] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 12229 [post_author] => 16 [post_date] => 2016-09-16 12:24:14 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-16 12:24:14 [post_content] => After 2 wonderful years and 3 great months at Snook, I’m moving on to do a master in Service Design at the Royal College of Art in London. This new chapter will not be the end of my time at Snook, as I’m eager to contribute to upcoming projects and will be joining as an ongoing associate. Before I leave the Glasgow studio, Sarah asked me to do a blog post of my highlights at Snook. Here are my proudest moments! 22028608786_e08608ec63_z

1. Aye Mind GIF workshop

Workshops, images, GIFs! Aye Mind is our project improving the mental health and wellbeing of young people by making better use of the internet, social media and mobile technologies. A collaborative project with brilliant organisations; NHS GCC, Young Scot, Mental Health Foundation and funded by the European CHEST fund. I led the first GIF making workshop, with the rest of the Aye Mind team, encouraging a small group of young people to have a dialogue about mental wellbeing through GIF making. Image making allows people to think about mental wellbeing and what advice they’d like to hear in a playful and creative way. Those feel-good images and messages can then be shared with others online. Since then we’ve created a mini version of the workshop, and we’ve published exactly how to run the workshop (including the downloadable materials) online. This means that the workshop has now been carried out at least 10 times by us and others, with over 300 people participating and an even larger number of positive mental wellbeing messages going out across social media. Check out #AyeMind to see the images and messages. Check out this post if you’d like to run your own workshop. 22028608786_e08608ec63_z

2. The new studio hunt

Our old studio was above a quintessential coffee shop on Bath Street, and we were fast outgrowing it. With no prior property knowledge, I set about finding a new design studio for Snook. What a hunt it was! I started by looking around the city at ‘office space to rent’ signs, phoning the numbers, working out how many square feet our new place would need to be. Gradually I started to understand rates and energy efficiency charts. I got to know a few estate agents over the months as I studio-hunted who were bemused by our requirements. Every estate agent in Glasgow: ‘You need a place with no carpets?’ Me: ‘Yes, a design studio never has carpets.’ Eventually, with some help from Anne and the rest of the team, we found our current studio, a huge spacious top floor office that needed some renovation. And here we are all settled in at 84 Miller Street!

whoseroundsadgirl-min

3. Whose Round and Cash for Kids fundraising

Using Whose Round, a project that promoted safer drinking for young people, in collaboration with Young Scot, we decided in 2014 to raise money for children’s charity Cash for Kids by asking people to swap a drink for a donation. We were promoting the message in bars on social media, at Christmas parties and all over the city. Eve and I spotted an opportunity; the taxi drivers of Glasgow. There are hundreds of them, daily coming into contact with thousands of Glaswegians night and day. If we could get our alcohol awareness message into their cabs we could reach a huge amount of people, and remind them to swap a drink for a charitable donation. Network Cabs liked the idea and invited us to their headquarters that day to drop off business cards with the message on. I hopped on a train to an old business park in the middle of nowhere, where I saw a taxi depot. I was taken to meet the Network Cab boss, who warmly shook my hand and took a huge bag of Whose Round/Cash for Kids promotion from me. They insisted that I got a Network Cab back to our studio on them and that Christmas we raised over £1000 for Cash for Kids. img_7932-copy_1340_c

4. Jam Jam Jam

The Service Jam takes place across the world, strangers collaborate to design, build and test new products and services. The tagline is ‘48 hours to change the world’ and it’s a lot of fun. I went to my first jam in 2014, before I started working at Snook and the event opened my mind to the possibilities of service design. The next year I was a designer at Snook, and helped brand, organise and run the 2015 Service Jam alongside expert hack/jam/lab leader Keira. For the brand identity, I captured the wild spirit of the jam by pouring jam on the scanner for the poster! Then in 2016 I ran the Glasgow Service Jam, a lively event. Two people who attended Snook’s Service Jams are now running their own jam events in Ireland and Hungary, I hope we inspired them to inspire others. IMG_5502

5. Auburn Snooks

Another highlight for me was setting a mental wellbeing brief for American Auburn University students, and leading them through the design process alongside Eve. They came up with brilliant prototypes including; a campaign for Solitude, a location-based ‘Friendr’ App, a journal for reflection, a new way of linking with others playing sports, as well as my person favourite, positive messages on coffee cup sleeves.

communityalcoholcampaign_posters_1-4-min

6. Community Alcohol Campaign

We were faced with a tricky mission; to encourage people over 18 to think twice before buying alcohol for underage people, and to offer alternatives to drinking for young people in Glasgow. For this campaign, I loved trekking around Govan with Marie, armed with some simple activities that encouraged people to open up about the tricky topic of underage drinking in their community. We even re-appropriated the drinking game ‘Never Have I Ever’ at a youth club to get young people talking about their experiences of alcohol and what they felt should be done to combat it. This user research culminated in a tailored campaign that encouraged community responsibility through portraits and quotes.

See you soon Snook!

The rest of the team have made all the workshops, interviews, away days, days in the studio, and nights out an absolute joy. Snook is a rare organisation with an attitude to learn and grow constantly. Always open to innovation within the company and looking at how things can be done better. I would recommend Snook to anyone looking for an encouraging workplace where they can have a real impact. [post_title] => 6 Snook Highlights from Charlotte [post_excerpt] => Moving on to do a master in Service Design at the Royal College of Art in London, after 2 wonderful years and 3 great months at Snook. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 6-highlights-charlotte [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=12229 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [17] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11986 [post_author] => 23 [post_date] => 2016-07-12 09:02:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-07-12 09:02:11 [post_content] => Design Disruptors is a documentary created by InVision. It explores more than 15 companies, valued more than $1 trillion, that have one crucial thing in common - using design thinking approaches to overtake the industry by design. Disruptive design is best explained with the words Uber, Airbnb and Netflix. After enjoying some refreshments and popcorn, we took our seats in the London Palladium amongst many other creatives. The film was shown and an interview with Tobias van Schneider, formerly Spotify, followed after. Design Disruptors explains how disruptive companies have gone from being small start-ups to the world's leading technology companies. The movie itself presents deep conversations with design leaders and product designers from across the globe showing their work behind the scenes. The key to their success is being customer-centric and re-thinking the way that services have been designed before. 
“Understanding how design directly impacts your user makes you powerful. That power makes you dangerous to incumbents.”

- Braden Kowitz, Design Partner at Google Ventures

Uber or Lyft being a great example of this. The taxi service was created to solve the issue of getting around a city quickly and economically but; yet with technology we now demand more than just that from a service. Through designing in a customer-centric way, companies create world changing products that make lives easier.
“If your design looks pretty but doesn’t tell a story or create relationships with your people, you’ve failed.”

- Bob Baxley, Head of product design at Pinterest

[caption id="attachment_11992" align="alignleft" width="900"]InVision_DesignDistuptors Just before the movie starts. Photo credit: InVision, Facebook album[/caption] Design Disruptors looks in-depth at an area that has not been covered in the media much before and really highlights the importance of design in future products and services. The question is: will it be the next must see documentary? See the photo album of the London premier here. The Scottish premier of the movie will be in Edinburgh on 1st August, 6pm at CodeBase - make sure you get your tickets [post_title] => Snook at the London Palladium for the long-awaited Design Disruptors premier [post_excerpt] => Design Disruptors is a documentary created by InVision looking at the transformative power of design. Few of our Snooks went along to the London premier, here's what happened there. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => design-disruptors [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=11986 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [18] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11884 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2016-06-20 17:08:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-06-20 17:08:05 [post_content] => The EU Referendum is this Thursday, 23rd June 2016. It’s an important decision for the UK and we will be voting.

Snook vote

To give a clear idea of our company stance on the issue, each one of us voted anonymously online. The result was pretty clear: 100% of Snooks vote for remaining in the EU. Snook vote We want to take this opportunity to clarify our stance:   Snook believe in staying in the European Union. Snook_EUremain2 [post_title] => Snook vote remain [post_excerpt] => Snook vote remain. We want to take this opportunity to clarify our stance. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-vote-remain [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=11884 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [19] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11292 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2016-04-19 10:14:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-04-19 10:14:30 [post_content] => We’re excited to announce the launch of Snook Training – a series of Service Design training workshops focused on specific sectors. We’ve developed these sessions from years of experience to support organisations in developing the in-house capacity to become customer-centred, design great services and deliver value to end users. With Snook training, we’re focusing on turning our experience and methods into sessions that train staff and showcase pathways to embed design and agile approaches inside organisations over time.

How it all started

At Snook, we’ve always considered the importance of design-led organisations and the people within. These are fundamental to design and delivering great services that focus on user needs. This approach ultimately leads to increased revenue and/or improved efficiency. We know in our hearts it is right to focus on developing organisational capacity. As experts, we continue to lead in designing services, but we also want to ensure our emphasis remains on growing the organisations and the people we work with. For that reason, we have developed a series of training workshops focused on specific sectors where we teach design methods and the real how of developing a service and business that supports it. We have started with the Education sector, and we are iteratively developing these to work with our existing clients and sectors we have experience in. Over 2016/17, we’ll be launching an open Service Design Essentials for Businesses training and anyone working in the service sector. This includes developing specialist courses in service design for sectors including health, the cultural sector, local government and the cross-over within ‘digital transformation’ projects. building capacity

What’s on offer now?

Service Design for Education training This training focuses on the education sector and higher education specifically. Why? Because in the world of increasing competition and external metrics, higher education institutions (HEIs) are facing pressure to perform. Increasingly, students are judging institutions by their overall experience and that picture is informing the choices they make. In addition, institutions are coping with legacy systems and the old way of doing things, and we all know there must be a better way to deliver a great student experience. Our training process of service design allows us to break down the student journey, the components of how the experience is put together and how it is delivered at the same time. We believe in future-­proofing institutions by showing them how to be able to confidently design experiences for students and staff that work and are sustainable. As well as identifying new ways to solve problems that impact your institution, the one-day and two-day Service Design camps will teach you how to put your students, staff and key stakeholders at the heart of the design process.

Why should you come along?

A key approach which is rapidly gaining ground in the Higher Education sector is to use human-centred design to make services more useful, usable and efficient. There is already plenty of evidence of how this approach has impacted on public service delivery – for one example, the SPIDER project. During out training, you'll learn more about ways of fostering continuous improvement and how to deliver consistent service standards whilst understanding client needs. This includes:  

building capacity2

We’ll be joined by

We’ve teamed up with Jean Mutton to deliver the Service Design for Education training. Since 2007, Jean has pioneered the application of service design principles to improve the student experience working with a range of HEIs across the country. Jean has vast experience of working within the education sector having worked in management within the Higher Education sector for over 30 years. Jean is a consultant in service design and co-authored a Guide for Service Design for FE and HE published by JICS.

Come along

Our next training session is a one-day workshop on Thursday, 5th May in Lancaster. Grab your tickets today or find out more by clicking on the image below. Snook training_Lancaster

Let’s chat more

Got you interested and you’d like to find out more? Check out our website and get in touch with our training team. Email: training@wearesnook.com Receive news and updates on upcoming events on specific sectors: subscribe to our newsletter   [post_title] => Introducing: Snook Training [post_excerpt] => We’re excited to announce the launch of Snook Training – a series of Service Design training workshops focused on specific sectors. We’ve developed these sessions from years of experience to support organisations in developing the in-house capacity to become customer-centred, design great services and deliver value to end users. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => introducing-snook-training [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=11292 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [20] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10548 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2016-02-09 18:00:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-02-09 18:00:44 [post_content] => Graphic Designer Full-Time / Salary dependant on experience Are you ready to Snook? We're looking for an experienced Graphic Designer to join our multidisciplinary team at our HQ in Glasgow. Could this be you? Read on and apply before the 1st of March.

The role

As a Graphic Designer, you will be a key part of project teams delivering work that identifies and improves services, products and experiences for our clients. We are looking for designers who are confident, can work across teams with minimal support, can convince others of their design decisions, are able to mentor and teach, and can take responsibility to manage smaller projects.

Essential skills

 

Team skills

 

Desired Skills

 

Application details

We want to see a CV, online portfolio and an example of something you’ve built on the internet. Send this to jobs@wearesnook.com with the subject title “Hire Me | Graphic Designer”. Remember, the deadline for this application is 1st March. Good luck! [post_title] => CLOSED: Come Snook with us! [post_excerpt] => We're looking for a Graphic Designer to come Snook with us. Could this be you? Read on and apply before 1 March. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => join-snook [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=10548 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [21] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9176 [post_author] => 19 [post_date] => 2015-12-07 14:45:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-12-07 14:45:46 [post_content] => It's now the 7th December and, if the constant stream of Christmas tree related Facebook posts are anything to go by, you should be in full Christmas swing! To help you along with the Christmas spirit, we've asked around our Snook team for some of their favourite festive tunes to get you all excited for the holiday season. We've included a fair selection below, so take your pick! A rather modern Christmas playlist: https://open.spotify.com/user/spotify/playlist/3rjw5lJe4Yxd0ruERmNJ3s Charlotte is a 90's child – who didn't love DC back in the day? (or even still now?!): Marie is supporting her fellow Canadian, choosing the one and only Bublé: https://open.spotify.com/album/1AoFsqvJxNkiPnidP4mWhk Eve – I'm afraid this one is a bit of a Scrooge when it comes to Christmas, but it's good to keep the posts balanced: https://open.spotify.com/artist/48ErVeccMDF5UiHA4TdGWr Alex is a little bit in love with Bing Crosby. If you've not watched the film 'A White Christmas' before, make sure it is on your list for this years Christmas movies: What's your favourite festive tunes? Let us know and we'll add them to the list #snookadvent [post_title] => Snook Advent Day 7: Festive Feels [post_excerpt] => It's now the 7th December and you should be in full Christmas swing! [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => advent7 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=9176 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [22] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9169 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2015-12-01 14:41:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-12-01 14:41:47 [post_content] =>

We call it Snookspiration.

To get our brains moving, inspired and ready to kick-off a Monday morning, Snook hold a Monday Morning Meeting (MMM).

A team member delivers a 15min activity that is energising, team building, thought-provoking, or simply crazy: from Snook Inc monsters and the Wiki Band Game to naming all of the countries of the world in 15mins (or at least trying to).

MMMs are also time to share learning and reflection. Each person writes five things:

As a long-standing tradition, we store the first two post-its on a spike. As you can imagine, we have accumulated a lot of post-its!

Reflection and Gratitude

December is a good time to reflect on what’s happened over the past year; what we’ve been grateful for; how we’ve grown and what we’ve discovered. Here’s an overview of the hundreds of post-its from last year’s MMMs.

As we really like findings and synthesis (and may we add we’re really good at it), we discovered the top things we are grateful for. What have you learnt in the last year? What are you grateful for? Tweet us.

  This week, we're grateful for:

World AIDS day

  [post_title] => Snook Advent Day 1: Snookspiration [post_excerpt] => December is a good time to reflect on what’s happened over the past year; what we’ve been grateful for; how we’ve grown [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => advent1 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=9169 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [23] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8352 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2015-08-01 15:10:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-08-01 15:10:37 [post_content] => Last week, I spent the day at Hyper ‘prototyping’ a lesson plan – sharing both Service Design and research methods and how these can/are used within organisations and how to overcome barriers. When I say prototyping, getting the short straw coming nearly last after so many fantastic industry experts I asked the crew at Hyper what they wanted to learn. It’s easy to take design method toolkits, books, videos, tutorials etc but actioning these within large, and complex environments and organisations can be a struggle to say the least. So, I focused not only teaching how I/Snook practice ‘design’ but also how to think about creating environments within organisations to allow design the space to be used. It was refreshing to share this thinking, as we re-brand Snook, it's less out with the old in with the new, but more an exercise of finally communicating what we've always been doing - organisational design and interventions whilst we co-design new products and services. The crews' questions were challenging and spot on, a sign that you'll want to hire these guys.  They know their stuff, have a depth of experience from working directly in Healthcare in Boston to graphic design in the advertising industry so there is a confidence in industries of all kinds. Now, they are learning the magic of collaboration, dealing with conflict, design facilitation and the power of visual – all underpinned by experience design.  Seriously, ones to watch I reckon. This post is a quick synopsis of promises I made to share reports and slide decks I mentioned. My presentation: we didn't go through all of this but the focus is on how to present strategy and recommendations after a design research stage. It is a collection of our work with councils and Governments and my thinking on designers making platforms and space for knowledge exchange to happen.
Hyper Island from Snook
Dept. Health and Dept. Work and Pensions report with the Point People. Breaking down learnings/insights and then recommendations. Worth a look for the subject matter on mental health and employment. For the Hyper crew, an example of breaking down design research and seeing how reports can be split into sections via either user groups or topic matters. Critique of the emergent lab culture in governments and local authorities. We discussed the benefits of labs around creating space for innovation and also the down falls of lack of mission and focus on process rather than outcomes. This report comes at a time where ‘lab’ culture is growing.  This helpful report on growing social innovation by the Young Foundation supplies a short synopsis of other methodologies to driving social innovation in cities. More links to lab reports here. Snook's Learner Journey Report for Scottish Government on breaking down insights and research across the Learner Journey in Scotland. As an addition, it was great to catch up with Lauren, my co-founder of Snook, as we both drive forward in new directions and after ten months of our heads down on developing our pathways, it was great to share, challenge and compare our current work.  It is quite unbelievable to both sit down together and reflect on where we've been and come as two young woman starting out in Scotland. We recounted both the highs and challenges of running a business and shared our ideas for the future on where we both want to go. It was also nice to be positively heckled during a talk (by Lauren of course!).  Thanks Lauren for having me, I’m always excited for a Hyper visit. [post_title] => Snook goes to Hyper [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-goes-to-hyper [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=8352 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [24] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8280 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2015-07-30 10:16:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-07-30 10:16:15 [post_content] => Snook rebranding. It’s happening. It’s a big endeavour but it’s exciting!

Where do you start with rebranding Snook?

A company rebrand is always exciting. And daunting. Snook was born 6 years ago and since then, we have grown and changed considerably. This year in particular, we opened a new office in London and continued to build on our work across England. We are also moving our Glasgow headquarters to a larger new office and opening an events space. With business expanding, we are refining our strategic direction and working on our website to ensure it reflects what Snook has become and our full potential. At this stage, we felt the need for a company rebrand. The design and development of Snook’s new brand identity is a joint team effort and spreads across the whole offer of Snook, both externally and internally. A re-brand for us is not top down. As always, it is bottom up and includes our customers and audiences giving their input and feedback into the process. This journey means we not only cover graphic and digital design but at the same time look at our strategy, service offer and ensure this works alongside our business plan and future aspirations. It involves strategic sessions with Sarah and our team. We’re using their knowledge to reflect on our tools and services, our previous and future work and their input into what will help us move further towards our ideal state as a company.

#OPENSNOOK

Snook’s rebranding started with an #opensnook session in March 2015. We worked on our company as we would with any of our clients. The team focused on identifying our key stakeholders, mapping everyone that interacts with Snook – from clients to workshop participants. We worked through a branding circle discussing and defining our mission and core values. This exercise helped us clarify our direction as a company. Approaching our identity rebrand as a team highlighted some of Snook’s core strengths, a sense of shared responsibility, ownership for what we stand for and deliver, personal initiative and positive company culture.

Snook expertise

We also clarified our expertise by dividing our offering into 6 key services: - Research - Design - Strategy - Delivery - Build Capacity - Events Having all these elements in place helped us structure our thinking to tackle the visual part of our branding and ensure that our direction reflects the complexity and breadth of Snook’s expertise as well as its values and mission. This influenced the choice of our logo, typefaces, colour palette, patterns and will guide the development of endless Snook’s assets (which we are still in the process of mapping through brainstorming sessions and shared documents). While working on the new brand, Snook’s designers had to keep some distance. Balance their inside knowledge of the company with views and feedback of the team while mitigating their attachment to Snook and its old/new brand identities.

Time management

Unsurprisingly, one of the main difficulties of an in house rebrand that emerged during this project is time management. Juggling external projects and Snook’s branding, resulted in prioritizing the former and postponing the latter. To overcome this issue, we defined a stricter development strategy and timeline, using Basecamp and Evernote to track to do’s and milestones and Slack for internal communication and brand updates for the wider team. Once our basic brand is defined, our plan is to use the expertise of the team, having specific team members leading the development of various components of our identity. For example, a grid/layout system for all our documents, and a range of templates suitable for the development of proposals, reports, toolkits, presentations, prototyping, mockups and wireframes.

The new brand

The brand is still a work in progress but we are set on keeping Snook name with its cheeky nature, and keep the red colour which we have used throughout the 6 years we have been in business. We wanted to go for a more modern, slick feel than the original logo; keep our Scottish component which has always been at the heart of the company, but translate it in a more geometric pattern and new colour palette that builds a DNA for all our documents based on the content. We are very excited to start sharing snippets of our new identity so keep an eye on our Twitter, Facebook and Instagram!

A question for you

Meanwhile, we leave you with a question: what new tagline would you give Snook?‪ We welcome your feedback and views so share your thoughts using #opensnook and follow our progress. [post_title] => Snook Rebrand [post_excerpt] => Snook rebranding. It’s happening. It’s a big endeavour but it’s exciting! The brand is still a work in progress but we are set on keeping Snook name with its cheeky nature, and keep the red colour which we have used throughout the 6 years we have been in business. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-rebrand [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=8280 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [25] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7862 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2015-06-22 15:55:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-06-22 15:55:26 [post_content] => You’ll see that the website is evolving slowly. It’s technically our 10th week of redevelopment and rebrand. In reality, the team has been launching, managing and finishing some big projects for our clients. So the new website gets pushed back to the bottom of the list but little by little, we’re getting there.
Here’s an overview of what we’ve been up to:
Defining our offerings
We categorised our competences into six groups: research, design, strategy, delivery, build capacity and events. We're working on defining them further so that they fully demonstrate all our strengths and expertise. Putting together client testimonials Client quotes is another new feature on our website and it aims to showcase not only the variety of work we do but also validate it. Forming a framework for case studies In accordance with our offerings, we outlined a framework for case studies. We highlighted this as an important area in moving forward with presenting the projects we've worked on. The framework will enable us to create a consistent display of information across all of our work. Gathering Content This part can be tricky, especially when you have a constantly travelling team. We have been using gathercontent platform to manage content, allow team members to work collaboratively on a case study, monitor progress and capture all relevant information in one place including multimedia and tags. The platform is extremely useful in other aspects of collecting information: we use it both internally when managing communications and externally with clients. Brand Strategist We welcome back Robin who recently returned from South America. She's currently working on our rebrand. Version 1.4 is on its way. We're glad to have you on this journey with us. [post_title] => Open Snook V 1.3 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => open-snook-v-1-3 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7862 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [26] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7699 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2015-05-18 22:55:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-18 22:55:02 [post_content] => opensnook_mvp1.2 It’s week three/four/five of our Open Snook project and given I’m posting this in our fifth week we’re behind our schedule. Last week, during our Monday morning meeting (nicknamed the MMM) we had a discussion on our Moscow  framework for the site.  We’re using Moscow to develop  the online site iteratively (and other elements of Snook) by discussing, and voting internally if needed on what is most important to build/develop next.  You can view our planned schedule here. Previously, using our own design tools in an internal hack event with the team we developed personas of our audience.  Don’t worry - we didn’t over stereotype anyone, but we created descriptions and characters of different types of clients, students, citizens, chief executives. 16323986503_bfedb3e98e_z This was important exercise for a few reasons. 1. As a fairly new team it was important for me to share knowledge of our clients and audience past and present in terms of what they are looking for from Snook and our services.  We try our best to help our customers achieve what they need to so it is important we understand their motivations. 2. We articulated key needs of each person at a wider scale than just the website. This was questioning why our audiences interface with Snook.  We also included audiences we currently don’t attract and would like to work with. This open exercise at the beginning of any project blends into many levels of company and brand development.  Whilst undertaking needs exercises we’re also discussing brand, tone of voice, how to display case studies, what it is that we do. Here’s an example of some of the needs: As a Middle manager, I need clarification that what we are designing is the right idea so that I can validate what our organisation is doing is right.  We do this by hiring Snook to undertake testing of our product. This is the same method we’ve used with organisations like the Department for Health and Department for Work and Pensions when designing digital tools for mental wellbeing and employment.  GDS champion the approach and you can read more about it here. 3. The above exercise then allowed us to synthesise user needs into what functions and specific content we need to create online (and offline). We then begin prioritising this. Some of our core needs included: 1. Understanding what Service Design is 2. Seeing a strong client track record 3. Understanding how we work With each need and series of concepts we are going to test the idea being developed. Obviously there are the most important needs which include being able to contact and find us which was our version 1.0. What we hadn’t considered here was the below need, which as a live company is very important. As a potential collaborator on a bid, I need to validate Snook’s credentials and learn more about their past work so that I can utilise this content into writing a shared bid. We do this by checking out their case studies and client list. So - this whole process is about sharing how we design for our clients, and testing it on ourselves.  One of the most important elements of design is to listen to feedback from your customers. One of our team brought feedback to the table that some of our potential collaborators were trying to find out more about the company and our clients and without much information online they questioned who we were and couldn't validate us. For this reason we've brought in several quick features that show ongoing work. Client logos of our past experience, a link to our blog which is an ongoing stream of information and embedded our twitter where we communicate on a daily basis about our work. Next week we're focusing on shipping our client testimonials and bringing together our first Case Studies from the old website. See you at version 1.3. [post_title] => Open Snook v 1.2 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-1-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7699 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [27] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7624 [post_author] => 16 [post_date] => 2015-04-29 18:40:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-29 18:40:30 [post_content] =>   We are working with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde on developing a new campaign and strategy around the alcohol consumption of young people in Glasgow. With Govan as our pilot area, we have been speaking to members within this community to gather insights around the behaviours of young people and alcohol as well as the motivations of agents who purchase alcohol for underage drinkers. It was vital that we speak to a variety of stakeholders from off licences to young people to families. Valerie Carr, Marie Cheung and I visited a youth group in Govan to better understand young people’s attitudes towards drinking, with the hope of creating a new campaign with co-design at the core. We used a number of different methods to encourage the youth we met to openly talk about drinking in Govan. We have seen an abundance of ‘design research’ methods being used, but often find them to be paper based which can be a hinderance if someone has literacy issues or a short attention span. Of late, we have been incorporating games as a way to draw insight but also make a fun experience for the people we are working with. CACBlogpost2 ‘Never Have I Ever’ is a common drinking game. We played a modified version of this with the people at the youth centre. We made it clear that we were gathering insights on their drinking habits and encouraged them to stand in a circle with us. For example, the person in the centre of the circle would say ‘Never Have I Ever… got someone to buy alcohol from the shop for me’ and then people, who had done it, would swap places with someone else in the circle. The person unable to find a new spot would contribute the next ‘Never Have I Ever’. This game worked well as an icebreaker and provided an interactive way of gaging answers. The young people were able to disclose as little or as much as they wanted, in their own comfort zone and they got to lead the questions, rather than having us interview them. Each person took turns standing in the middle of the circle and asked their peers about their experiences. It was also good for us to join in, which meant we had to do a little confessing ourselves while fostering this shared experience with the youth. When running this method, our recommendations include to: Prepare a research outline of what you’re seeking to uncover so you can steer the direction gently, but don’t over do it. 1. Ensure you’ve got a few early ‘Never Have I Evers’ stored up your sleeve to encourage the group if they are shy. 2. Get involved in the exercise to build their trust, but make sure someone’s there to take notes and observe too. 3. Watch out to make sure everyone feels included but don’t push anyone to take part if they don’t want to. 4. Consent forms - always. While traditional paper based tools are useful and necessary, sometimes hacking existing games and incorporating them into the research process can lead to interesting insights that you would not otherwise get. By getting the young people involved in asking questions from the get-go, we were able to uncover new lingo and learn about their individual perspectives in a casual and engaging way.   [post_title] => Snook Method: Never Have I Ever [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-method-never-have-i-ever [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7624 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [28] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7599 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2015-04-28 22:24:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-28 22:24:34 [post_content] => opensnook_mvp1.1 It’s week two of Open Snook and internally our team capacity is full on with the development of a new project (Glasgow City Council Website re-design), our continuing work on Social Finance with the Cabinet Office, preparations for the Global CycleHack (which now has 55 cities signed up) and our development of Community Alcohol Campaigns for Glasgow with NHS GGC. Not to mention, I’ve been in Austria this week at a conference on Tourism. You may have seen the launch of Open Snook last week, with version 1.0.  I made reference to the difficulty of re-branding a company whilst in delivery mode.  Those of you who run companies at the helm or operationally will know exactly what I mean.  I’ve heard this from so many directors that they find it hard, just like us, to carve out the time to re-brand themselves. Developing a new website often aligns with a re-brand and at Snook, when we talk about brand, we don’t just mean logo and colour palette, we’re looking at the very core of what it is we do and where we want to go. We’re asking who we are? What is it that we do? How do we talk about our work? How do we create a sustainable model? What are our principles? What have we learned? How do we share this? Are we having impact? We’re looking at the very core of who we are and how we present this back out to the world. But if we did this all at once, we’d never manage to produce anything. So with Open Snook, we made a commitment to put our thinking out there, deliver as lean as possible and see the reaction. So far so good. But there’s not much on here - yet. That’s why weekly we’re shipping the updated version.  We’ve been using the MoSCoW framework to develop our functions and content for the site and ensure to deliver lightly.  If we didn’t do this, I know we would have put off producing any new content until at least June of this year. Our version 1.1 framework is here, and you can follow all the function votes. M - Newsletter Sign Up S - List of Basic Services C- What we do, Client Logos, Case Studies W - Blog layout So up next, it’s our Newsletter function.  This year we developed an internal role for communications and documenting our work via a newsletter, Eve's been at the helm of this.  I asked her to give an overview of why we're learning newsletters matter when going out to your audience:
"A Newsletter plays an important role when communicating with your clients/customers/users. It gives us the power to effectively communicate our achievements, updates and intentions through an up-to-date informative content delivered to our audience on monthly basis. The importance of sending a bite-sized newsletter out to our audience with relevant and interesting content gives our subscribers the unique experience of getting to know us. Along our journey, the first thing we learnt is that having a tidy, up-to-date database systems (CRM) is the first step we need to take in order to build a relationship with our audiences. So far, we've sent out three newsletters and we keep learning and improving with each one. We take the time to closely look at data and what our readers find most interesting: from clicking links of interest and user journeys through our content, to your unsubscribe reasons."
I had aways been sceptical of a newsletter, I’m personally pretty bad at opening them, particularly since Google has now separated my inbox.  However, our newsletter that went out on Friday, within a few hours ago had been opened over 300 times within the first hour with 283 clicks to additional content.  We’ve been using Mail Chimp which is a great online service to manage your contacts and send out content to groups.  What Eve's shown here is that as much as there is a front facing element which you see in the form of our newsletter, it's taken us a while to integrate and develop the internal function to deliver this from honing our CRM to creating the space for staff to provide content and links.  We're now finally getting into the swing of it. So, with Eve, our data and comms whizz in the studio, we’re watching the data patterns and learning what works, what doesn’t and what people are interested in.  The data we’re getting is incredibly valuable in designing what kind of content goes out and how we frame it. So version 1.1, not a huge update functionally but we’re integrating a Mail Chimp sign up function for our newsletter so we can go to where our audiences are, their inbox. Up next we’re planning an overview of the core pillars of what Snook does which we’ve discussed at length on how to breakdown but that’s a whole blog post in itself. I hope you’ll sign up to our Newsletter, I’m very proud personally of the company and my team who work hard across a diverse breadth of projects on a daily basis to share it with the world. I give you version 1.1 of Open Snook. [post_title] => Open Snook v. 1.1 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => open-snook-v-1-1 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7599 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [29] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7589 [post_author] => 29 [post_date] => 2015-04-13 11:06:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-13 11:06:18 [post_content] => opensnook_mvp1.0 Welcome to #opensnook, an experiment in opening up our development as a company, stripped back and in the open. Back in January I unveiled our strategy and 12 month plan to the team.  It went something like this: "6 months of web development between projects, content development and strategy sessions.  A big reveal in June." After showcasing this to the team, I was pulled up for my own over-planning and reminded about our belief in agile, shipping quickly and regularly, building minimum viable products (MVPs) to get ideas out of the studio quickly. I began to wonder: "how could we be more agile about this process, and not over plan our new website and offer?" As project work grew, internal development time decreased. January slipped to February, and then early March was upon us. Then it came to us. Build a Snook MVP. So, we started Open Snook, a process to share how we develop ourself, using our design and digital tools.  You can follow all of it on #opensnook. I'm letting go of my own personal fears, much like our clients often have when we talk about prototyping and showcasing to the world what we're developing and how.  We're using and testing our own methods and tools to develop Snook's improved approach. Our approach is to make sure we practice what we preach. Build quick, ship quick, watch data and what people respond to, and build more of it.  Put design thinking at the heart of our development. We’ve got a huge amount of content to share and I’ve made sure that this is part of our regular team sessions. We’ve developed new communications roles, content curation platforms and some of you will have seen our newsletter bringing you a dose of Snook into your inbox every month.  We've had to work on as much of the internal roles and structure as we have on the outside.  This is our job as service designers, you have to link up the front stage (what customers see) and the backstage (how you deliver it).
In March we ran an internal Snook Team Hack on our approach, our strategy and our brand.  I’ll be touching more on this as we develop the site but we mapped our customers, touchpoints, brand promise and began to articulate by looking at our previous work what we’re good at and what we’re offering. For version 1.0 of our site we used Moscow, a great framework that prioritises the most important features you need to build first.  Moscow in my eyes stands for: M - Must have S - Should have C - Could have W - Would like to have (and should probably never happen). Normally this means won't have but we've adapted this to work with our idealistic and optimistic thinking. We had a huge list of functions and content mapped that the site ‘needs to have’ from project timelines to showing which projects are live and archived.  This can often paralyse companies who see these developments as huge undertakings.  Yes they are, but they can always be broken down in to chunks. We have an ongoing Moscow list after brainstorming everything we wanted our new website to have. But to simplify it and ship quickly, this is our Moscow for V 1.0 and 1.1. M - Title, Address, Phone Number, Contact Email, Standard web policy S - Newsletter Sign up, List of basic services, link to live content on social media platforms C - What we do, Client Logos, Case Studies For Version 1.0 we’re going with our absolute must haves. Enjoy our Snook MVP, there isn't much here but you will slowly see it develop over time and read about how we're developing our business. I’m looking forward to launching Version 1.1 next week and having you come along the journey with us. [post_title] => #OPENSNOOK [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => opensnook [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7589 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [30] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7352 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2015-02-02 17:53:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-02-02 17:53:18 [post_content] => This Monday, it was my turn for a Snookspiration (I'm Eve, by the way!). The game goes like this: 1. Have sharpies and paper at the ready and ask everyone to draw a super hero of the person sitting on their left. 2. Think about what inspires you about this person, what impresses you about them, what they are really good at and turn this into their super power. 3. Draw away! Then share your super hero with the team, and who knows - your sketch might be soon printed on a personalised office mug!? Everyone has super powers! What's yours? Happy Monday, everyone! [post_title] => MMM: The Snook SuperHeroes [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => mmm-snook-superheroes [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7352 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [31] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7272 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2015-01-27 14:13:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-01-27 14:13:08 [post_content] => My Dad has always been one for making and sticking to plans. If we go holiday we need to be packed the day before, at the airport at least an hour early and all the travel documents need to be in order in a plastic sleeve in case of rain. Family outings, even for a lunchtime meal, have become a very serious affair. I guess I take after him in that respect: I’ve always been very good at planning out where I am going and what I want to do. I think I recognise that either through luck, skill or a mixture of the two, I will make sure I get there. sambeforeedit_Fotor3 copy As early as primary school in Edinburgh, I knew I wanted to do something artistic and creative with my life. At high school at I knew I wanted to do something in design. And by the time I was studying Product Design at the Glasgow School of Art, I figured that I was doing the right thing. But, you can imagine my dismay when I found myself a university graduate without a plan or direction. Despite this inherent design inclination, for the first time, I found myself unsure of where I was supposed to go. A summer of deliberation and escapism later I was applying for design jobs in and around the Scottish central belt looking for the next direction to take myself in. I was fortunate that this next direction became Snook. I was welcomed into the studio on a dreich Monday in October with smiling faces and offers of tea, and over the past three months I’ve had the pleasure of picking up new skills, working on innovative projects and meeting some truly fantastic people. I worked first on an ethnographic research project exploring the near future of personal banking and monetary management. This was a breath of fresh air to me after a summer of design withdrawal. I found myself re-finding my design footing in interviews, analyses and concept development and all within a fortnight timespan. After this warm-up of my designer muscles, I moved onto aiding the ‘Dearest Scotland’ campaign; a Snook developed initiative to gather the Scottish public’s hopes and dreams pre, during and post independence referendum. I was given the task of further embedding Dearest Scotland into casual spaces in Scotland for which I developed and began ‘manufacture’ of a series of pop-up letter boxes to be placed around the country. Subsequently, Dearest Scotland has become a project quite close to my (Brave) heart and I am excited to see how it evolves in the coming months. Snookster DS Whilst spinning the proverbial Dearest Scotland plate, I was also introduced to Snook’s ongoing work with Carr Gomm in Edinburgh. At Carr Gomm, we were working to embed service design principles and methodology into the running of their organisation and to educate and train their staff on how to identify and creatively solve problems. The all-day workshops in Edinburgh necessitated some offensively early trains from Glasgow Queen Street but even they failed to dampen my mood; I was designing for a living and loving it. Snookster Carr Gomm Now, my time at Snook as a Snookster has come to an end and it goes without saying that I have appreciated my time spent here immensely. It has served as an interesting first foray into what I can expect of being a design professional. And I have to say; I quite like what I see. On further good news, I have the pleasure of announcing that I will be joining the Snook team full time as a Junior Designer in this New Year. The part Snook plays in the evolving role of design in Scotland is so instrumental, and I feel equally excited and honored to be a contributory to it. It seems I’ve developed a plan after all. Dad will be pleased. [post_title] => Samster The Snookster - A Reflection on Interning at Snook [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => samster-the-snookster [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7272 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [32] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7253 [post_author] => 29 [post_date] => 2014-12-19 17:21:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-12-19 17:21:35 [post_content] => What a busy time it was being a Snookster! I am writing this on reflection, after my snookstership has ended, and I am working as a Junior Designer at Snook. I pursued Snook like an ardent suitor, and they managed to forgive me for spilling tea down myself and my portfolio at my sninterview. On my first day I was a bit overwhelmed by tech: Basecamp, Evernote, Google Drive, 10,000ft were things that were new to when I started at Snook. IMG_7429Every Monday we have a big Monday Morning Meeting, everyone makes an effort to do a Snookspiration (you can click here to see mine). We also write on post it notes 'Last Week I Learnt' A bit like saying grace before a meal, except it’s before the working week. IMG_8757Last Monday my ‘Last Week I Learnt’ was that being a designer involves more than design. This seems obvious, like being teacher involves more than teaching children and being a farmer is not all picking vegetables and feeding sheep – they probably also have to do paperwork, planning, tidying, and cleaning... But I still think it is worth noting that being a designer involves doing more than sketching things and sitting on Adobe. I concede that I didn’t do an internship at Snook, I did a ‘snookstership’ which is way funner and more enriching. My snookstership was awesome because I wasn’t just sitting on my mac, I wasn’t just making tea, I wasn’t just making videos, I wasn’t just making spreadsheets – I was encouraged to do all of those things, occasionally simultaneously. 10557635_1529731950574889_9111285643404645862_oWhose Round is the project I was thrown into; an alcohol awareness campaign for young people in Glasgow, with Robin the project lead as my inspiring mentor. My brief allowed me a lot of creative freedom, which I wasn’t expecting as a wide-eyed graduate fresh out of Uni. I talked to lots of strangers, via email in real life and on the phone, and got better at it in the process. Robin and I went out on many nights armed only with Golden Cones and persuaded drunken people to have their photos taken. We spoke to people who said ‘You’re promoting alcohol awareness, but we’re already drunk’. Of course there is no point promoting alcohol awareness to people who are always sober. I made a fake sick concoction and spat it all down myself on camera, for an alcohol awareness film. I went to Dundee with the Know Sugar team and spoke to people about diabetes, and made a little film about the weekend. So being a designer turns out to involve writing pub quizzes, and being a quiz master. Growing sunflowers and emailing people. Going to meetings with interesting people who care about design. All of the exciting extra tasks that come with being a designer are the things that make it interesting. Being a snookster and a designer at Snook requires more than design skills, which is why I love doing it. Punny title by Sam Johnson. [post_title] => (Char)Lotte's to Learn - A reflection on being a Snookster. [post_excerpt] => This is the post excerpt , trimmed down to 20 words , What a busy time it was being a Snookster! lorem ipsum dolor sit amet [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => charlottes-to-learn-a-reflection-on-being-a-snookster [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7253 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [33] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7237 [post_author] => 29 [post_date] => 2014-12-15 11:37:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-12-15 11:37:09 [post_content] => ... an alcohol aware Christmas! This morning, it was my turn for Snookspiration (I'm Alex, by the way). Now, many of you may consider it a cop-out to have the team make Christmas decorations – but it's our final week of Snook working, and there's a distinct lack of festive cheer in the studio. (Not quite bah humbug, but not Christmassy either.) Doing our bit for the environment, as well as being innovative and creative, we used our scrap paper to create paper chains, and a Christmas tree! Most of our scrap paper features mock-up print outs for one of our current projects, an alcohol awareness campaign called Whose Round. Find out more about the campaign, by clicking here. This festive period, the Whose Round gang have teamed up with Best Bar None to raise money for vulnerable children. Money raised will go to Glasgow children's charity, Cash for Kids – so swap a pint for a donation, and support a child by texting GLAS81 £3 to 70070.   IMG_4601 IMG_4603 IMG_4604 IMG_4605 IMG_4606 IMG_4607     [post_title] => Snookspiration: It's beginning to look a lot like... [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snookspiration-its-beginning-to-look-a-lot-like [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7237 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [34] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7121 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2014-10-28 12:11:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-10-28 12:11:28 [post_content] => Includem, a charity that support some of society’s most troubled and vulnerable young people, this month hosted their annual staff conference in Cumbernauld. Since May, I’ve been working as an embedded designer at Includem. Sarah and I headed along to the conference to share some of the things young people and workers have been helping me work on over the past few months. Around 90 members of staff were in attendance for a jam-packed day of talks, workshops and the highly anticipated buffet lunch (note to self: tacos do not assist engagement in sophisticated conversation). Guest speakers included Dr Carol Craig, CE of the Centre for Confidence and Byron Vincent, poet and comedian, who reflected on his own experiences as a young person in “various northern sink estates”. The conference saw the launch of our newspaper, which hopes to answer the question “What is Transitional Support?” and presents some of the ideas proposed and developed by young people and workers over the past few months. Staff received a copy of this in their delegate pack, and the young people involved will receive their own copies this week. The conference was also the platform for the premiere of our “Now Including” film, in which four young people and three Transitional Support workers share some thoughts on the Transitional Support Service. Conference_6029 We took this opportunity to facilitate a workshop with staff; “From Where to Here?” With some gentle guidance from Sarah and I, participants mapped a spectrum of “transitions” of young people they knew or had worked with. By exploring a wide variety of journeys, we hope they were able to learn from the real scenarios they investigated together and some of the ways in which challenges were overcome. Conference_6035 Participants were also able to appreciate the immediate benefits of creating simple visual stories as a way of quickly documenting thoughts, insights and ideas as well as the advantages of “doing, not talking.” Creating quick and simple visual versions of events leads to far more valuable discussion and the ability to move ideas forward. Conference_6002     Conference_6033 In a very short workshop, attendees had told the story of a young person’s transition, identified particular highs and lows, and thought about how some of these were tackled at the time, or could be supported in the future. We hope they feel confident in experimenting with these methods in the future and can use them with young people or within team development etc. So what next? On November 28th, Transitional Support and I will be presenting our film to the Scottish Transitions Forum – at an event exploring their seven principles of good transitions from the perspective of young people and parents. It is hoped that we can support a young person to attend this as well. I’m excited to begin developing and implementing prototypes from proposals put forward by young people and outlined in our newspaper. I’m looking forward to working on this in collaboration with young people and workers from Transitional Support again. This week I’ll be meeting with Includem’s Development Team to discuss some ideas regarding plans for team training, development, sharing and learning, with the aim of giving Includem the tools they need to practice this sort of thinking in the future. I'll also be taking a look at "Your Views" - Includem's current feedback platform, and helping to develop this into a tool which encourages greater participation. There are already some exciting proposals on the table for this, so hopefully we can develop these in a series of prototypes with young people and workers. Alongside this, by reflecting on some interesting insights from my time at Includem thus far, I'm hoping to help implement a strategy for engaging young people in a meaningful way in the future, which benefits individual young people and Includem as a whole. [post_title] => Snook at Includem's Staff Conference [post_excerpt] => Includem, a charity supporting troubled and vulnerable young people. The day-long conference was jam-packed with talks, workshops and more [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-at-includems-staff-conference [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7121 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [35] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6897 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2014-08-20 11:22:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-08-20 11:22:44 [post_content] => Lack of blogs doesn’t mean lack of action here at Snook! We have been amazingly busy with so many projects that we have struggled to find the time to blog. We are excited to have been accepted to present papers at a few high level conferences this autumn. Sarah will be presenting a paper entitled ‘Moving Beyond the Consultancy Model: Strengthening Design Approaches for Public Good’ at the Design Management Institute conference in September http://www.dmi.org/?page=ADMC2014 This is a paper that we have written with our client, Trevor Lakey, Health Improvement & Inequalities Manager with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. Trevor has a focus on Mental Health, Alcohol & Drugs, and we have recently completed an innovative co-design project for NHSGGC with Young Scot and Mental Health Foundation, www.wegot99.com In this paper we reflect on the learnings from this project, and on the need for new forms of commissioning partnerships and processes to evolve between design agencies and statutory public bodies that allow the space for design driven innovation to flourish. Valerie (along with the rest of the RITA team) will be showcasing the RITA project (www.rita.me.uk) at the King’s Fund International Digital Health and Care Congress, also in September. http://www.kingsfund.org.uk/events/international-digital-health-and-care-congress Their paper, ‘Developing a digital advocate & care service with an empathetic heart and a medical mind’, will draw on psychological research and service user feedback, to demonstrate, by way of interactive vignettes, how RITA will work and the types of support she can offer. Valerie will be presenting another paper focused on the RITA project ‘Exploring a technological framework to support control and Conservation of Resources through cognitive decline’ at the Alzheimer’s Europe conference in Glasgow in October. The theme for this conference is Dignity and Autonomy in Dementia, and the RITA service model fits well into this theme, as it is designed to support older people to remain independent for as long as they can. [post_title] => Snook publishing and presenting papers [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => publishing-papers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=6897 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [36] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6816 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2014-06-09 11:28:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-06-09 11:28:00 [post_content] => Every now and again you meet somebody who is really special. Roxana is one of those people. She came along to the Snook Ensemble in 2012 and within a few weeks she was a Snookster. We were lucky to work with her for two years and now we're celebrating her time  at Snook - she brought optimism and smiles in magical doses, as well as sheer hard work and determination. Roxana has worked on a wide range of projects for our clients such as Stirling Council, NHS 24, Scottish Government and Hyper Island. She's written clever stuff about what she learned and we are delighted to share it with you.
"Service design? Say what? In this blog post I will tell you about how I went from Occupying to working with the government. In September, 2011, I was a visual perfectionist with a fresh Communication Design MA degree and a strong determination to change the world, a desire that sprang out of personal experiences of a world that wasn't rising to my expectations. First, I Occupied, but at the end of the day, occupying felt too passive for me. So, I became a Service Designer at Snook working in the public sector in Scotland. After 2 years in the field, I feel I have something useful to share. I want to tell you about what being a Service Designer entails, what it takes to apply it in the public sector and a few tips for those who are thinking to work in this sector. Service Designers? Service Designers are applied scientists. They research the world as it is and use that information to hypothesise possible scenarios of how a specific service could be different, design a strategy for it and then test it with the end users. If the odds are on their side, they also get to implement that strategy. Implementation is usually a complex process and is dependent on many external factors such as budgets and organisational aims. Community engagement Service Design starts with people and studying their behaviours and values. You need to continuously find new ways of using existing or inventing new research and engagement methods that help you relate to the people you meet in order to gain insight into their lives, needs and desires. The art of designing engagement tools can sometimes turn into a hexagon-shaped hell when you do it for the first time (as it did for me), but most often, keeping things simple is best. As much as it is about finding patterns, researching for design involves looking deep into the detail and identifying the oddest insights - they can sometimes be your best friends. Knowledge carriers However, giving people a voice is only the start. One of the key roles of a Service Designer is facilitating interactions and building relationships between service providers and users. At Snook, Service Designers are called translators. What this means is that, as a facilitator of conversations between the user and the provider, you need to carry knowledge from one to the other. In order to do so, you need to  know how to generate insights from research and work with different levels of meaning. There are so called 'lower level insights' and 'higher level insights' and you need to ensure that your final insights belong to the same level of meaning. Co-design To make your idea a reality, you will need to learn to be a maverick and a deep end diver. That means using your skills and ingenuity to test your ideas. Putting your rough prototype out into the real world is scary, but vulnerability breeds power. This stage in the design process reveals important aspects about your design that you might need to reconsider. It is an iterative and emergent process that can be very efficient and insightful when users are invited to use and give feedback on your prototypes. Organisational change Service Designers work together with organisations to apply and implement the services co-designed with users. Working inside the public sector can be challenging if you are someone who has had little contact with this sector. Supporting organisations to put people first, implement changes and sustain them takes determination, guts and patience. You will need to go out of your way to understand dynamics of politics and organisational culture. You will also need to be fluent in 'Ultimate Babel' in order to relay information targeted at many different audiences and choosing your language accordingly depending on whether you are addressing the NHS, local government or academia. Future Service Designers Here are five lessons I learnt from my experience as a Service Designer at Snook: 1. Immersion in a new sector or field is a long process and requires interest, sharp focus and an enterprising spirit. Service Designers need to place great emphasis on immersive research that allows for deep insight and knowledge creation. 2. Service Designers need to work closer than ever with clients and involve them at every stage of the design process. Similar to how the public sector needs to work together with their users in order to deliver user-centred services, so designers need to create an accessible narrative for design to increase buy-in and demand of designed services. They need to educate clients and the public about the value in design and what it can do in order to usher supporters who can advocate for procurement processes, funding streams and systems that facilitate a thriving environment for small design organisations and independent designers starting out. 3. Graphic Designers, working in a Service Design studio will be the ultimate challenge to test your abilities of communicating clearly, concisely and effectively. However, you will need to give up your visual perfectionism for adaptive empathy. Typography is beautiful but most often, in Service Design, legibility will do. 4. Working in the public sector can sometimes mean you have to consider politics, agendas and organisational dynamics. You will need to learn where your responsibility as a designer ends and where the clients' start. Without management skills, you will not achieve the impact you are aiming for. Stand your ground, delegate work efficiently and master filtering feedback and responding to it. 5. 'Design is not always sexy'. (Sarah Drummond, Co-founder at Snook) It is not about Post Its. It is, though, about people skills, management skills and intentional mindsets that are able to construct a vision, build efficient partnerships and use design to turn insights and creative concepts into realistic and sustainable innovation. What is design? Practising in a field that is constantly evolving and where new disciplines are rapidly emerging, it is imperative that we constantly probe ourselves and seek to build a coherent discourse for our discipline. My experience of working at Snook has prompted me to reframe my design practise. Service Design has allowed me to support organisations to research and implement development by involving the user. In further pursuing my career in design, I am interested in reversing the process and using design in supporting individuals to gain access to unknown worlds, whether that is the financial gobbledygook or their neighbour's morning routine - I am eager to design visual, experiential and immersive interventions that open the design process to the public and engage audiences in conversation, critical thinking and build new connections and relationships between people. From Service Design, I gained a glimpse in the public actor in Scotland and the processes behind it. This will allow me to act as a more educated challenger of the status quo and someone who can make realistic and informed suggestions of ways in which life in society might be different. In this time of scarce jobs and financial adversity, I feel as young designers, we need to reinvent conventions and catalyse alternative ways of thinking. But in order to do that we need to first challenge our own practise and take our personal and professional selves outside our comfort zones."
We're extremely sad to be saying goodbye to such a talented and wonderful human being! The good news for YOU is Roxana is now transitioning into Experience Design and is available for collaborations and adventures of all shapes and sizes. Be sure to follow her tweets, check out her website and seize the chance to work with her! [post_title] => Five lessons I learned at Snook [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => five-lessons-i-learned-at-snook [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=6816 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [37] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2956 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2012-08-03 10:01:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-08-03 10:01:05 [post_content] => Sync is a new two-year programme for the cultural sector in Scotland and we excited to be part of it!
"Sync will be hosting Culture Hack Scotland — a playful and productive experiment to see what developers, designers and cultural professionals can make together in just 24 hours. We will be running a Geeks-in-Residence programme — pairing up creative technologists with forward-looking organisations to make new, valuable, ambitious projects. And we will be publishing an online magazine called SyncTank — showcasing the freshest thinking about how digital is enabling, inspiring and changing our cultural practice and experiences."
Snook are delighted that our very own Andy Young is part of Sync’s first set of Geeks-In-Residence. The 2012 placements are: Denise Ross working with Stills. Stef Lewandowski working with Eigg Box/Island of Eigg. Yann Seznec working with Scottish Opera. Phil Leggetter & Andy Young working with macrobert. Alistair Macdonald & Andy Young working with Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo. Now that the matchings have happened, over the summer each of the talent or talent pairs will meet their host organisations and start to explore what direction their residency will take. Sync are looking forward to what should be five exciting and instructive engagements and of course as the residencies kick-off and develop everyone will be sharing their stories through SyncTank. So for now, congratulations to those six people and also the five hosts and we're looking forward to supporting Andy on his Sync journey!! [post_title] => Snookster / Geek-in-Residence [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snookster-geek-in-residence [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=2956 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [38] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1589 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-09-09 15:33:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-09-09 15:33:52 [post_content] => This month we held our very first Snookersuperfication event. We were delighted to welcome these awesome people into our new studio: // Matt Stitt, a final year product design student at Grays School of Art in Aberdeen // Alex Barton, founder of studentdesigners.com // Christina Kinnear, Regional Membership Manager at Design Business Association // Daniel Sunden, a final year product design student at Glasgow School of Art in Glasgow // Katie Edge, founder of Edge to Edge design // Flaviu Lungu, a freelance digital designer // Charles Tomlinson, a freelance graphic designer // Barbara Beek, recent Illustration graduate from Duncan of Jordonstone College of Art and Design in Dundee // Craig Owens, recent graduate of Jewellery and Metal Work from Duncan of Jordonstone College of Art and Design in Dundee // Jamie Sunderland, a third year product design student from the Glasgow School of Art in Glasgow // Claire Abraham, a fourth year textile design student from Duncan of Jordonstone College of Art and Design in Dundee // Lucy Denham, a service designer based in Northumbria // Eleanor Forrest, a human factors consultant We didn't have an agenda so we started off by deciding what we were going to talk about for the rest of the day. Here are some of the questions that came up: // How does Snook find projects? // Where do Snook's ideas and motivations come from? // How do you measure impacts of projects? // How do you freely scale a service design business model? // What is best ways to engage non designers with design methods? // Will service design still exist in 5 years? // Where can we ( and how ) apply our design skills to / in Scotland? // Does Scotland have a vision? what is yours? // What is the one thing you would change about design education? // How do Snook plan to get involved in design education? Most of these questions tap into ventures we are working on right now so it was great chance to learn from each other and share experiences. We held a break out sessions around the Studio Unbound focusing on how to get yourself out there when you are a designer. Also, we held a break out session about designers working in the public sector and the role craft plays in the work designers do.
"Just a quick e-mail to say THANK YOU for your time and invitation last Saturday. I had a great time, met interesting people and learned things too. I admire your willingness to bring creative people together and tell us a bit about the business you are involved in. Again, THANK YOU and say HI to the entire Snook team!!! :)))))" Flaviu
"Thanks again for the invitation to the Snookersuperfication and for organising such a nice gathering of people.  It was very nice to get to meet you in your own offices (great location by the way!) as well as getting to understand better your vision of service design (and Design in extenso). But what I am the most grateful for was the chance to meet, talk and interact with a very interesting group of like minded people.  If we add to all that an awesome buffet, we really had all the ingredients for a very pleasant afternoon and evening." Charles
"Just would like to say thank you for having me on Saturday! Thanks for putting up with all the questions!@ It was lovely to catch up with you, Sarah and Kirsty and be inspired by what you are doing! Your achievements have (jealously) spurred me on and given me a great additional enthusiasm boost :)" Alex
Thank you to each and every one of who you came along. We really enjoyed meeting you all and learning about what you are up to and the journeys you are on. Hopefully, this is the beginning of something exciting that can bring something valuable to the table. We would love to hear your ideas for the next event - who should we invite? what should we do? If you would like to be part of the next Snookersuperfication event send an email to lauren@wearesnook.com with ‘Snookersuperfication’ in the subject line and tell us in less than one hundred words why you would like to be part of it. [post_title] => Snookersuperfication success! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snookersuperfication-success [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1589 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [39] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1574 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-08-08 08:44:06 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-08-08 08:44:06 [post_content] => This Saturday Snook are holding our very first Snookersuperifcation event. Over the course of the last year, we have met many interesting and dynamic students and graduates. We’ve been blown away by the potential of young thinkers in this beautiful country. We want to meet and get to know every single one of you who write to us so we figured getting you all in the same room would be quite powerful as well as good fun! The informal get together is happening in our studio on Bath Street, Glasgow and we will provide food and pop some bubbles. The exciting news is we have a few places left so if you would like to come along send an email to lauren@wearesnook.com with 'Snookersuperfication' in the subject line and tell us in less than one hundred words why you would like to be part of it. Of course, we have ideas around design education, entrepreneurship and Scotland that we want to develop with you too! [post_title] => Snookersuperfication [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snookersuperfication [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1574 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [40] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1466 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-07-06 09:19:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-06 09:19:00 [post_content] => We are delighted to be part of ignite100 Europe's first £1 million accelerator programme for digital start-ups. We believe it is one of rare funding programs that understands the realities of taking an idea from scratch to functioning business. ignite100 is a mentorship-led accelerator program for start-ups but with a big £100,000 difference. They provide seed capital, office space and mentors, and the runway necessary to sustain momentum after the end of the acceleration programme. ignite100 comes in the shape of an intensive 13 week programme based in Newcastle in the North East of England – home of the Thinking Digital conference and the programme’s predecessor, the Difference Engine.     I met Paul , the program manager of ignite100, at the Virtual Enterprise Conference and I am looking forward to meeting him again and learning and sharing with the mentors and applicants. Snook are big fans of Newcastle and I'm excited I now have a reason to take a trip there! Submit your idea today! Closing date for applications - 17th July 2011 and it's open to people with ideas world-wide!     [post_title] => Snook mentoring ignite100 entrepreneurs [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-mentoring-ignite100-entrepreneurs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1466 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [41] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1412 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2011-06-20 09:55:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-06-20 09:55:48 [post_content] => Hi, I'm Karen, and I'm the newest addition to the Snook team.  When I first came across Snook and the work that they were doing, I was incredibly excited.  It seemed to me that there was enormous cross-over between the work they do in 'transforming people' and what I'm all about. Snook were looking for a graphic designer.  I am a graphic designer, but in a previous life I also worked as an occupational psychologist.  This means that I have worked with people and teams to understand how people work and interact within organisations, and have also been involved in enabling culture change.   At the heart of both Service Design and Psychology is a real focus on people.  Understanding what motivates them, what they want from services or products and how to get the best from them.  The work that Snook do is all about enabling positive change through design.  Occupational psychology also studies how to enable change within organisations.  The fundamental principles of both disciplines are the same - it's all about the people at the centre of the process; listening to them, being empathic and designing services that suit their needs. So for me, Snook ticked a lot of boxes.  Working for Snook not only enables me to use my graphic design skills but also to indulge my love of discovering what people think.  And for Snook, hopefully the same is true - they get a graphic designer but also someone who is totally engaged with the aims of Service Design, who understands the importance of the people at the centre of the design process and who knows how to empathise with people. It's been a whirlwind few weeks since joining Snook.  But from what I've seen so far, I can honestly say I have nothing but admiration and respect for the energy, passion and dedication that Lauren, Sarah and Kirsty bring to each project that they take on.  They seem reflective, thoughtful and full of enthusiasm for making communities a better place.  I am too.  I hope that I can add as much to Snook as they will undoubtedly teach me. I'd love to hear from you if you'd like to discuss any of these ideas with me.  You can email me on karen@wearesnook.com or talk to me on twitter @karenjmaxwell. [post_title] => Hi I'm Karen and I'm new at Snook [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hi-im-karen-and-im-new-at-snook [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1412 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [42] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1394 [post_author] => 29 [post_date] => 2011-06-06 10:12:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-06-06 10:12:23 [post_content] => I’m the new boy in Snook. Well actually I’m the only boy in Snook. And the only person over thirty. Well over thirty actually. So those are the gender and age issues taken care of. Snook is a brilliant and beautiful idea that I am thrilled to now be a part of. Design has this incredible potential to transform public services and the civic sphere in positive and progressive ways, and Snook is at the very vanguard of this new design movement. The challenge is to develop new strategies and tools that empower ordinary people to shape change. I see the new design as a political force that replaces the tired and irrelevant mechanisms of party politics with a vibrant socially responsible creativity. At its core, Snook comprises four dynamic, highly talented and visionary individuals whose  productivity and quality of work is simply remarkable. They have already made their mark on service design in the UK, and founding partners Sarah and Lauren have been invited - all expenses paid - to run workshops and consultancies from New York to Beijing, from Taipei to Berlin. And they have only just graduated. That is truly remarkable dynamism.   The world is transforming and needs wholly new ideas, creative tools and methods of working. Those companies reshaping our world, from Google to Twitter, and the emerging social movements creating a new impulse for democratic change, as we have seen in the Arab Spring, are led by a new generation that has not been institutionalised, and is more determined to embrace change. Snook is part of this. In the corporate world, there’s another new phenomenon - bi-generational management, which is the norm for most successful high tech start ups in the US. Linking the youthful vision of Generation Y to the experience of the Babyboomers appears to give new companies a competitive edge. That is what we hope too! I actually have a day job. I am Professor of Design Policy at the University of Dundee. I have written two of the leading texts in the field of design management, which have been translated in Chinese, Russian and Spanish. I have led major research projects in design, and been a design policy advisor to the UK government. I was co-director of the Design Council’s Design Against Crime project. I have been invited to speak to conferences throughout the world, and have broadcast on TV and radio about design. Before working in design education and research, I was a community activist and research consultant for local government and trades unions. I taught one of the founding Snook partners, and feel privileged to be working alongside her in my associate role within Snook. One of my jobs is to help Snook develop and grow, and to help manage that process of change. So, I act as a coach and mentor to the team and an advisor on their strategic and operational development. Snook is in the knowledge business. So am I. This means that my second role is that of helping Snook communicate the knowledge they create, and turning that knowledge into products. I also help to ensure that Snook is informed by the latest academic design research, and where necessary to build alliances and partnerships with academia. Snook has always had a strong educational role and ethos, demonstrated through projects such as Studio Unbound and more recently Matchable. As the education landscape undergoes continued transformation, then new opportunities arise for Snook to innovate and provide new services. I will be working very closely with them on this aspect of their business. A new chapter is opening for Snook. This is nothing to do with me, but is a consequence of an expanded full time team, new projects, a new dedicated office in the heart of Glasgow, new business systems and new strategic objectives. Exciting times. Very exciting. Especially because I have a small part to play in the shift from Snook Beta to Snook 1.0. I can't wait to see Snook 2.0!" [post_title] => Hi I'm Mike and I'm new at Snook [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hi-im-mike-and-im-new-at-snook [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1394 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [43] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1388 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2011-06-06 09:42:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-06-06 09:42:28 [post_content] => I'm very excited and proud to announce I have won a Google Fellowship! I am now in New York City to attend the Personal Democracy Forum ; the world’s leading conference exploring and analyzing technology's impact on politics and government. Can't wait to meet the rest of the winners! Photo credit: Keso     [post_title] => Snook win a Google Fellowship [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-win-a-google-fellowship [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1388 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [44] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1306 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2011-05-09 10:00:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-05-09 10:00:50 [post_content] => I have been spending time with the local Barnardos team in Onthank, Kilmarnock. The area has become somewhat infamous since the BBC documentary, 'The Scheme', aired at the end of last year.  The series has been currently pulled from our TV screens for legal reasons. It sparked off some fair criticism from Lauren who hails from Kilmarnock. The Barnardos team are seeking new ways to engage with young people in the area and get them back into work, education and training. I introduced different ways of engaging communities and we talked about how you can tell a visual story of what people think about where they live.  We discussed the concept of co-creating new projects in the six areas that the team will be focusing on. Using method cards we looked at a range of engagement techniques - setting up online platforms and how we could feedback public opinion to the community.  We then spent time visualising what all these tools will look like.  The visualisation of online spaces, posters and stickers were really important at this stage as it developed concepts past a phrase on a post it to a fully fledged idea that asks more questions around a multi-channel engagement process. The team generated the idea of a long-term project called 'Wee6' that asks people what they would like to change in their community and then plays it back as a film/exhibition. This idea is all about telling the real story of the area and generating new 'Wee6' community projects for people to get involved in. We created the first steps to engagement focusing on how we will relay what we find out back to the community. It is important that this process considers mindset so it is a sustainable solution and not a singular process.  The goal of the piece of work is to secure a 'Wee6' shopfront so the team can be based inside the community -  almost functioning as a miniature job centre of 'Wee6' community projects for people to bring ideas forward and get involved! We'll be visiting the team again shortly to see how they are getting on! We wish them the very best of luck at the start of their Wee6 journey. [post_title] => Snook kickoff new project with Barnardos [post_excerpt] => Seeking new ways to engage with young people in the area and get them back into work, education and training. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-kickoff-new-project-with-barnardos [to_ping] => [pinged] => http://redjotter.wordpress.com/2010/06/15/poverty-porn-on-my-doorstep/ [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1306 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [45] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1317 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-05-03 09:57:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-05-03 09:57:43 [post_content] => We are looking for a new designer to join our team! Download the details here! We can't wait to meet you. [post_title] => Snook are hiring [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-are-hiring [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1317 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [46] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1228 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-04-10 15:17:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-04-10 15:17:25 [post_content] => Last week we met up with Sir Peter Housden to share the work we have been doing at Snook and our ambitions for public service delivery in Scotland. We had interesting conversations around the main changes happening in the public sector - in particular the idea of Scotland sporting one single police force. Sir Peter has invited us to present to twenty five of his colleagues - sharing what we have learned through the work we have been doing. We are on the threshold of the biggest change in public service delivery Scotland has ever been through! We are very excited about this opportunity to show Sir Peter and his colleagues how our thinking and approach may contribute to their thinking. [post_title] => Snook meet the Permanent Secretary to the Scottish Government [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-meet-the-permanent-secretary-to-the-scottish-government [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1228 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [47] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 931 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2011-04-04 14:27:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-04-04 14:27:28 [post_content] => I am very proud to say I will be on the judging panel of the eighth annual Guardian Public Services Awards ( launched in May ) The awards, showcase improvement and innovation by teams across the public, private and voluntary sectors, are recognised widely as the leading benchmark of excellence in our public services. Snook will be part of a panel of key figures from across the public realm promoting excellence in public services. Exciting!! [post_title] => Snook judging Guardian Public Service Awards [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-judging-guardian-public-service-awards [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=931 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [48] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4087 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2010-12-11 14:56:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-12-11 14:56:26 [post_content] =>

Finland

A couple of weeks ago, Snook spent time in Kuopio, Finland, courtesy of Satu Miettinen after Lauren had been a couple of years ago on her ‘Finland Frolicks’. We were invited to teach at the Savonia University of Applied Sciences.We had heard good things from Lauren’s Finland Frolics in 2010. We were working with the fantastic Work Play Experience who use theatrical tools in Service Design, a very refreshing take on the discipline. The visit was to run the Winter Service Design School at the university.  Working over two days we were taking the students and staff from initial research and film ethnography to concepts which will be prototyped for real.  The topic was designing for the elderly.  We looked at three strands:
Work play x

Work play x

We began with the fantastic warm up from Adam and Markus of Work Play Experience.  Anyone who has had the pleasure of being part of a WPX workshop before will know what it is like to warmed up in the company of rubber chickens.  The duo wake up the left and right hand side of the brain using some bizarre exercises, but it works, and participants are left wide eyed, determined and ready for some hard work. We were working from personas that had been created by the students and interviewees in the format of films.  We wanted the group to empathise with the personas they were working with so we sat everyone down in groups of three and let participants take on the role of their persona.  By simply having a conversation with one another as the people they were designing for, the group were able to dig deeper and understand what it is like to be a user. Grouping back together and pulling out insights was a tough leap for the workshop participants. At first, they kept referring to what they knew about their personas.  But after some probing we began to pull out interesting themes about the change in situation for elderly people when health changes, how people move from independent to dependent.  An interesting observation was about the points in people’s lives where people drift from families to becoming wholly dependent on them again, and looking at these points to delve deeper into.
Idea generation

Idea generation

Working with the three themes we then brainstormed ideas, in a quick, speed dating scenario.  Groups then settled on ideas and we set to work on the more difficult part; thinking of them in terms of services, rather than just concepts. Using story boarding and rapid prototyping we attempted to expand the group’s thinking from single idea to service.  It was difficult and this is always the biggest leap in imagination.  It was tough and we didn’t quite get there on the first day, but the second day really pushed the groups to expand their concepts to ‘fit’ into real scenarios and complex systems. Starting with Work Play Experience, the participants were put through their paces to improvise and act their ideas out  Supported by Adam and Markus the team who had developed the Skype service for elderly people living in homes had to really start thinking about how this would operate as a service.  By re-enacting the service as a nurse and an elderly woman in a wheelchair problems began to arise that the group would need to design around.  A great way to make participants consider how to design, not just generate ideas!!
Students blueprinting

Students blueprinting

Snook then led the group through a blueprinting exercise, to consider how people might become aware of their new service concepts, join, use and then ‘leave’ them.  We focused on starting in the middle, the ‘use’ part of a blueprint to outline the value proposition.  Breaking down the blueprint to front stage, back stage, and actions of both customer and staff.  We asked workshop to participants to think about what happens before and after the use part of a service experience.
Twitter feedback

Twitter feedback

We ended the fast paced second day with three presentations. We sent the ideas out into the world for feedback via twitter only 30 minutes before.  We received some great feedback so thank you to those who commented.  We had;
“Care in a Queue – adapted #iPad for patients in #healthcare: contact, care, entertainment 4 elderly outpatients in hospital. #servicedesign” “Feel free, connect in ur social life: flexible transport options. Welcome to the Senior Cheer-up Bus! #healthcare #servicedesign” “Closer from a distance: connect with beloved relatives via “Skype for the elderly”. Easy for people in #healthcare centres. #servicedesign”
All the presentations were great! Ideally, the next step for groups would be to move into some live prototyping but really focus on fitting them into the context of existing systems around them. We would also really like to go back to Finland again, it’s a very beautiful country with some fantastic food. If you’d like to know more about this kind of work, contact sarah@wearesnook.com and we’ll see if we can help. [post_title] => Snook in Finland [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-in-finland [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=374 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [49] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4086 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2010-12-11 14:44:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-12-11 14:44:18 [post_content] =>
"This is Service Design Thinking.« illustrates the young multi-disciplinary approach of designing services. Both layout and content are far beyond a mere textbook on a viral buzzword. The book itself is based on a Design Thinking process, including the knowledge and passion of the Service Design community and related fields. User-centricity and co-creation are not only content, but the initial position for the conception of this book. It is designed for beginners to get an outline of Service Design Thinking, for advanced readers to discover a variety of methods & tools and case studies as examples for its applications, and for professionals to use this book during lectures and workshops. Therefore, this book strives to use a simple, yet well-illustrated language to make it an exciting and enjoyable read. —Basics, the first part, outlines service design thinking along five basic principles and gives insights from various perspectives, co-authored by well-known experts. —Tools is the second part, describing a variety of tools and methods used in Service Design Thinking. The content was generated through a website, following a crowd-sourcing approach and worked out in a co-creative manner. —Cases as the third part gives vivid examples for the introduced fundamentals with real-life case studies from 5 companies that did inspiring projects within the field of Service Design."
[post_title] => Snook in TiSDT [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-in-tisdt [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=368 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [50] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 366 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2010-11-11 14:42:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-11-11 14:42:26 [post_content] => Another Snook adventure under our belt ; this time in Linkoping, Sweden.  The occasion? Servdes.  Traveling through some thick snow I made it to the conference, this time under the theme of Exchanging Knowledge.
“The Nordic Conference on Service Design and Service Innovation, ServDes, is the premier research conference for exchanging knowledge within service design and service innovation…Service design as a field has established itself as a strong discipline, through efforts in practice and academia. However, publications have mainly focused on establishing service design. There is a growing need for original research on service design. The ServDes conference is an answer to this call…”
In short, it was in-depth and fun. Making it the best event I have taken part in this year.  However, I struggled with the delicate balance between practitioners and researchers.  This was a recurring theme in some of the discussions I had about academia and practice can can link up and communicate better.  As an active practitioner, I’ve just left academia ; finishing a Masters on Embedding design in the public sector which was more action research and reflection than it was academic.  For me, this works, because at the end of the day, I want to make change happen.  Personally, I’d rather work with academics to document and theorise the work I do on the ground.  I’m wondering if Servdes will become the catalyst for making this connection smoother?
Snook were invited to present the case Service Design: social innovation is our motivation’.  The presentation reflected on a project, Getgo Glasgow, undertaken last year at the Glasgow School of Art. It depicts some of the issues the design community is facing when undertaking social design/innovation projects within design education. My presentation considered some of the shortfalls in the project ; time frames, delivery and ethics. How do designers leave a project like this ethically? Have we considered the consequences of sending young designers out to engage with communities/users.  You can watch my talk below: http://vimeo.com/17593687
The presentation aligned with Don Norman’s views published on Core 77: ‘Why Design Education Must Change‘.
“Many problems involve complex social and political issues. As a result, designers have become applied behavioral scientists, but they are woefully undereducated for the task”
This brilliant yet critical article picks on design education for producing undereducated designers who are ‘woefully ignorant of the deep complexity of social and organizational problems.’ In the case of GetGo, the community now have money in the bank and the project is really happening. Wyndford, where the project took place, is small area that are now mobilised as a community. We designed a process not necessarily a designed solution. The result ; Green Gorillaz wasn’t really designed, it was a half baked idea which was the bi-product of design methods and skills being used to work co-creatively with a community.
My presentation actually sparked some interesting conversations about interdisciplinary work, collaboration and the reality that designers are not experts in everything. It pays to know when and how to ask for help. The question and answer session revealed that students struggle with some elements of this type of project. For example, being equipped with the skills and know how to create intangible outcomes that are implementable. This is something we are aiming to get to grips with through our venture: Making Service Sense.

Highlights for me included Daniela Sangiorgi’s talk(s) on Transformative Services and Transformation Designbuilding‘.  It looked at building capabilities inside organisations to use and understand design to produce better services.  This was an area I felt was overlooked in Berlin at the SDN10 conference and was only just touched upon by Philips.  It mimics efforts made by Engine in their Hoop model and echoes sentiments from Martin Neumier’s Designful company which I reflected on for the last 12 months with a public body in Scotland on how to really use design thinking to create better services for the people of Scotland and more informed, people centered policy.
What Daniela put forward echoed closely with some discussions from the workshop run by Anna Serevalli and Anders Emilson.  They held a workshop on Social Innovation which looked at the criticisms and plaudits by Geoff Mulgan of design in social innovation.  Some of the points our group discussed were;
  • Design(ers) should be a-political
  • We need to create designful organisations and transform thinking
  • We should look to open source community for inspiration
  • We should be pushing for delivery and implementation
  • Designers are facilitators not experts
Eva-Maria Hempe followed some of the capabilities discussion with, Health and social care services for people with complex needs: The role of contextual knowledge for the design process’ and showcased a really interesting project.  More interestingly for me, was the pyramid at the end of her slides on Design capacity versus Design obstacles which I’d like to look more into and see designers considering this.
There were other really good presentations, far too many to mention, in short, a couple more were Marc Stickdorn’s presentation on students and tourism, showcasing how quick and effective service design can be. Also, Simon Clatworthy’s talk on Touchpoint cards was to the point and got some cogs turning about how we could use the template as a basic model to create our own more personalised cards for say tourism, or methods in Service design.
Finally, to end the conference, Global Service Jam was launched by Markus Edgar and Adam St john.  It will bring together different countries from all over the world next year to develop new services in under 48 hours and then share them online.  They’ve had a fantastic response already and if you want your country to be part of it, then I suggest you get in touch with them.
And not forgetting the unconference day, organised by Design thinkers ; an impromptu, insightful and busy day of talking, doing, and drinking coffee.

I ran a workshop called #swesno, which looked at using design thinking and methods to tackle social issues caused by Snow in Sweden.  Wearing santa hats, to get us all in the mood, one group tackled loneliness and isolation with the opportuniy of untapped engergy of kids playing outside in the snow, whilst the other group looked at the issue of ambulances getting stuck in the snow.  There will be a another blog post to follow on the outcomes of the workshop. The storyboarding method and pushing people as a vehicle through a new service design worked incredibly well, and took a group of participants 3 hours. They started from scratch, developing and blueprinting new service concepts which the Swedish authorities could implement. The day capped off with the launch of This is Service Design Thinking.  If you haven’t purchased it, do it.  It is a very comprehensive textbook which has been co-created by the design community.  I am very happy for the authors and am sure both Jakob Schneider and Marc Stickdorn are relieved to see their hard work come to fruition.

To wrap up, these conferences aren’t always just about the learning but are also about the friends you make.  It was lovely to make some new European and continental friends and catch up with old ones. It never ceases to amaze me how friendly, open and collaborative the Service Design community can be. Snook are humbled to be part of it. Huge thanks to Fabian and the rest of the Serv Des team for making this event possible. Here’s to next year and bigger and better snowball fights...
[post_title] => ServDes, Snook and Snowballs [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => servdes-snook-and-snowballs [to_ping] => [pinged] => http://vimeo.com/17593687 [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=366 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [51] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4072 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2010-10-11 16:31:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-10-11 16:31:09 [post_content] => Erik Roscam Abbing's new book, Brand Driven Innovation contains a illustration of a journey map I created for a charity for focused on Women's Aid. Good to see the rough sketches that are so prominent during the 'fuzzy front end' stage of the design process in print! http://www.branddriveninnovation.com/

[post_title] => Snook in brand driven innovation [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-in-brand-driven-innovation [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=402 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [52] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4071 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2010-10-11 14:35:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-10-11 14:35:45 [post_content] => "Having dug "beyond basics" of Service Design in many interesting presentations and workshops at last year’s sdn conference, it is now time to strengthen the relation between clients and Service Designers and support the cooperation and exchange between professionals. We will present a vivid mix of different presentations, workshops and papers in order to provide you with academic and practical expertise from renowned international players in the Service Design field. Additional to the designed conference time there will be a main focus on "open space" - time to connect, discuss and exchange. Don’t miss this chance to socialise, gain knowledge and exchange experiences with Service Designers, clients and service-oriented companies worldwide!" Watch the video of Snook's keynote presentation   [post_title] => Snook Keynote at Service Design Network Conference [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-keynote-at-service-design-network-conference [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=354 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [53] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4073 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2010-08-11 17:48:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-08-11 17:48:55 [post_content] =>
This book is a result of two years research into new types of community projects. The twenty-eight authors have contributed perspectives and stories on how ideas of participating and initiating within communities is changing.

Hand_made_tessy_britton

These innovative views are largely informed through experiences gained creating fresh and imaginative opportunities for people to come together positively in their communities to learn, share and make. Hand Made is part of the Social Spaces project. http://www.socialspaces.org "Ever wondered what happens when a bunch of passionate people come together to make something amazing happen? Hand Made is a story of life-affirming everyday creativity, reflecting a new state of mind ... exploring issues of identity, community, togetherness, playfulness and pragmatism. Active optimism for the 21st century. Now unleash your imagination and go play!" Dominic Campbell Sarah was one of 28 people who've contributed to this book. We all did so on a voluntary basis. The amazing work of the others is quite humbling. This tells the story of optimistic, practical and generous people doing the simple things that makes sense. http://www.flickr.com/photos/podnosh/4976615707/sizes/m/in/photostream/ ( photo credit podnosh )
[post_title] => Snook in Hand Made [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-in-hand-made [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=420 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [54] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1143 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2010-05-18 21:25:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-05-18 21:25:24 [post_content] => This week Snook are the special guests on the Coten Project. We made this video to share our views on service design education. http://vimeo.com/11806956 We talk about lots of things including our experiences of learning service design and the conversations we have with students and graduates who want to know more about the topic. For those of you who didn’t sign up to be part of the Coten Project you can post any questions / thoughts right here and we will get back to you! For those clever people who are part of it – please visit the main studio section and join in the conversation! [post_title] => Snook’s week under the coten spotlight [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snooks-week-under-the-coten-spotlight [to_ping] => [pinged] => http://vimeo.com/11806956 [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1143 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [55] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19575 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2020-07-01 16:40:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-07-01 16:40:27 [post_content] => Away from Snook you will probably find Jane in search of the most obscure South Asian food to be found in the markets and restaurants of Newham  or watching the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills through what she claims to be an anthropological rather than aspirational lens.  Jane likes to think she’s the only Snook who has worked with The Krankies. [post_title] => Jane Martin [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => jane-martin [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-10 10:39:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-10 10:39:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=19575 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [56] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19567 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2020-07-01 16:34:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-07-01 16:34:31 [post_content] => Throughout his career, Tom has worked with a diverse range of contexts including workplace strategy, sustainable mobility, domestic energy use, building retrofit and has volunteered with community organisations focusing on food campaigning. More recently, Tom has been designing services which incentivise the adoption of sustainably oriented services in parts of Milan, Lisbon and London. Tom has a particular passion for design practices that support environmental and social regeneration and is a huge believer in the importance of design in creating compelling and desirable futures. Away from Snook, Tom loves being on his allotment or searching for secluded routes around the chiltern hills on his bike. Tom has two very energetic daughters who try their hardest to prevent him from doing any of the above. [post_title] => Tom White [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tom-white [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-01 16:34:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-01 16:34:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=19567 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [57] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19547 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2020-07-01 16:09:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-07-01 16:09:01 [post_content] => Gillian is a graduate from Glasgow School of Art, where she studied Communication Design (BA Hons) with a specialism in all things Photography. Since graduating in 2018, Gillian worked with Outspoken Arts Scotland LTD, an arts production company in Paisley, who celebrate equality and those with protected characteristics through the arts. Her role was ‘Digital Marketing Officer Intern’ as well as designing everything from merchandise, poster design to a limited edition archival publication. She has experience within Retail, Digital Marketing and Design throughout her early career. She is passionate about self-love, sustainability, helping others and making a positive impact on the world.   Outside of Snook, you will probably see Gillian documenting the world around her through her Photography, describing herself as a Photographic Storyteller. Gillian is a Vegetarian and is always on the hunt for new Veggie/Vegan products to try and recipes to cook. When she isn't cooking, she loves to explore all the amazing Veggie/Vegan restaurants where-ever she goes. So if you need any suggestions on all things veg, Gillian is your gal! [post_title] => Gillian Lochhead [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => gillian-lochhead [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-01 16:09:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-01 16:09:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=19547 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [58] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19493 [post_author] => 20 [post_date] => 2020-06-01 12:41:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-06-01 12:41:25 [post_content] => On this Service Design Day 2020 we wanted to reflect on the many routes our team had taken into service design.  At Snook we currently have 32 service designers  and we asked them to tell us about their education and what led them to service design. Unsurprisingly 27 of our team had completed undergraduate degrees in design and you can see the different courses they took outlined below. Seventeen of our Service Design staff also have Masters degrees and 12 of these are specifically in design-related subjects. We have always been fortunate in our ability to recruit staff from across the world, giving us a strong international perspective, and we currently have staff from Australia and New Zealand, Taiwan, all across Europe (from Sweden to Portugal), and also Central America. Valerie Carr, our Director of Strategy shares her personal story of her introduction to service design by reflecting on who she learned from and what she learned. I’m the single Interior Design Graduate in the chart above and, after graduation, worked in Interior Design until I had my first son in 1989. I then completed a Masters in Computer Aided Design and worked for a while doing computer generated graphics for architects before moving into lecturing part-time.  I continued lecturing right through the birth of three more sons,  then decided to embark upon a PhD when the youngest was four.  We obtained funding from NHS Estates  to conduct a joint Project involving the School of Design and School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Dundee.  The project aimed to evaluate the impact of the built environment on birth mothers, their partners and staff in maternity units. I had the great privilege of being supervised by Tom Inns, a pioneer in Design for Innovation, and learning research methods from the team at the Social Dimensions of Health Institute.  I also learned a lot about evidence-based design and the importance of rigour in user research from the team at Center for Healthcare Design. Anyone interested in the outputs from the project can find my thesis here - but I warn you, it’s very long! It was while evaluating the impact of the built environment that I became interested in how we might design organisations and services to better meet the needs of those who access them. It  became clear that some elements of the interior environment which have been designed for specific  benefit did not achieve the desired impact because of organisational constraints related to how services were delivered.  After taking a midlife gap year in Burundi, Central East Africa, in 2009 we relocated to Lancaster where I worked as Research Associate on an 18 month research project “Design in Practice”.  This project built on the foundations of the Design Council Red Programme, the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement experience-based design approach, and the work of Ezio Manzini and team at Politecnico di Milano. It also gave me the opportunity to work with and learn from an amazing team at Imagination Lancaster.  Prof Rachel Cooper has been instrumental in defining the role of designers in the 20th/21st century (check the link to see another familiar name in Scottish Service Design circles). Daniela Sangiorgi was one of the first academics really exploring Service Design as a discipline in its own right, tracing the origins from other disciplines. The other members of our project team, Sabine Junginger and Monika Buscher brought valuable insights from Design Management and Sociology. Our reflections on the development of Service Design can be found in the papers we wrote.  In 2012, I joined Snook, who were the first (and only at that time) Service Design company in Scotland. Over the past 8 years I’ve had the privilege of working on a wide variety of projects across the UK and beyond. We've seen our team grow from 5 to over 50, and the breadth, depth and impact of our projects increase. We’ve seen User-Centred Design and Service Design become mainstream with the establishment of Government Digital Services and the Scottish approach to service design. Meeting user-centred design criteria has become mandatory for government services in both Scotland and the wider UK. I think back to the absolute bewilderment and frustration expressed by one of the GPs involved in our Design in Practice project in 2009, “I just don’t understand what design has to do with clinical practice!’ and hope more people across the public, third and private sector value the contribution design can bring to making services work better for everyone. 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About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As a Tech Lead at Snook, you will work alongside our other tech leads to assist in the day-to-day running of the development work within our digital design team, and provide oversight of their technical delivery.  You will work with the team to develop digital products and services, making the best use of budget to provide value for our clients and to our internal projects. You will help create a strong team ethic and foster a culture of partnership, consistent delivery, operational excellence and continuous improvement.  You will foster strong engineering practices, team dynamics and delivery. You will have experience of user centered design and delivery and foster a good working relationship between UI/UX staff and the rest of the build team.  Our Tech Leads will report to the Head of Digital and will collaborate across our user-centered disciplines, including service design, user research, operations and comms. 

Requirements 

You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter and your notice period. Send your CV and cover letter pdfs to 'apply-f0fe13d0220301@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: Tech Lead”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.    [post_title] => Tech Lead/Lead Developer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tech-lead-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-23 10:52:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-23 10:52:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19487 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [60] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19489 [post_author] => 55 [post_date] => 2020-05-27 11:58:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-27 11:58:54 [post_content] =>

About Snook

Snook is a design studio built to make the world more human. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this with our design team, engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. In the past five years we’ve more than doubled in size to a team approaching 60 people, opened a new London studio, and worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK to Hackney City Council, Tesco to the Scottish Government. Learn more about Snook’s exciting journey here. We have big plans for the next three years and are seeking people who can join us, working with our partners and clients to design services that support people to thrive. Below, you’ll find information on our requirements, the job responsibilities, our values, what we’re looking for, what we offer, and how to apply.

About the role

Our lead design training role focuses on building literacy in user centred design with our clients at Snook and our partner company Northgate Public Services. We have been training our clients for over ten years in design from the basics in prototyping to how to monitor services when they are live. We want to grow this capability into something special and are on the hunt for someone who can take existing practice into a launchable enterprise. A major part of the role is delivering a programme of work across Northgate Public Services to deliver user-centred design training across the organisation and build capability. Additionally, building a community of user-centred design and practice across NPS. This is an ideal role for someone with experience in service design and delivery who wants to focus on training and build a new offer.

Responsibilities

You will be expected to have the following responsibilities:

Our Requirements

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience: Desired skills: Most importantly, you’re looking to join a lovely team and support us in delivering great design work. Definite bonus points include an appreciation for gifs and bad puns.

What we offer

You will be on a Northgate Public Services contract, working in the Snook studio. Alongside a competitive salary, we can offer a contract with the following benefits:

How to apply

We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages. Please submit PDFs of a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a short supporting example of your work in the format of an A4 document highlighting key projects. Send this to 'apply-3f1e865e445701@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title 'Hire me: User-Centred Design Trainer' . If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. In the covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you would be a good candidate for the position, and why you want to work at Snook. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or have to travel after work we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours. Please note, candidates must be able to demonstrate a pre-existing right to work and travel within the EU. Documentary evidence will be required. All offers are subject to satisfactory vetting and reference checks. All roles as standard undertake a Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) check, some roles may require additional vetting such as NPPV/MOD. Northgate Public Services is an equal opportunities employer, welcoming applications from all communities.   [post_title] => User-Centred Design Trainer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => user-centred-design-trainer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-01 11:36:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-01 11:36:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19489 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [61] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19451 [post_author] => 29 [post_date] => 2020-05-18 14:36:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-18 14:36:57 [post_content] =>

This post is the first of a series in which we’ll look at how the UK social landscape has been shaped by COVID-19 and especially government, healthcare and communities. Our focus in these posts will be to share insights and tools that people can take away to help address their own challenges. 

  At Snook, one of our missions is to work toward a kinder and smarter next era of government, and so we have an immediate interest in current shifts in how public services work. Some of these services are new and very visible, like financial support mechanisms for people and organisations in crisis, or contact-tracing initiatives.  Others, however, might be less visible, but ultimately represent longer-term changes in the relationship between government and public.  In this post, we’ll share insights that we’ve gained from developing a tool that enables local councils to run official meetings online – an example of how everyday processes of democratic decision making are being forced to change by the crisis, and what long-term impacts might result

The democratic process, live from the kitchen table 

Before the pandemic only about 12% of the UK workforce regularly worked from home, with less than 30% having ever worked from home, so relatively few people or organisations had systems in place for staff to work from home. While it attracts little mainstream attention, how best to work from home takes on a different significance when it includes core parts of our democratic process.  In the UK, local government meetings are involved in granting permits, licenses, and planning permission, as well as allocating resources and budgets in their area; and a pandemic has meant local governments  needing to find ways to hold such meetings online Defining a service that would meet the legal requirements of a democratic process in a virtual space is more complex than it might first appear. From the second week of the lockdown, Liam Hinshelwood and Liv Comberti from the Snook team began to work with Neil Terry and Chris Cadman-Dando from Adur & Worthing Councils (A&W) to do so. We wanted to describe some of their insights from the development process, and launch a set of reflections for further conversations. 

How do meetings work in physical versus virtual space?

The meeting script. Council meetings run to a tight script. Adhering to an agreed structure is what makes these meetings legally binding. Although some functions of a meeting could be done in writing rather than in person, this would remove the opportunity for everyone to express their opinion as easily, make ‘responding’ in real time more difficult, and limit public participation. Finding ways to take the script online is preferable.  The physical space. Council meetings tend to occur in purpose-built chambers. These spaces are usually organised around a hierarchy, with the person chairing the meeting and their deputies in the centre, and the legal officer seated nearby to offer guidance where necessary. Those who will present, and those who are eligible to vote on arguments, are arranged around them. This makes it easy to see who is guiding the process. The virtual space. All this changes in a virtual context. Here, everyone is ‘on the same level’. The performative characteristics of space have changed, and adjustments to behaviour are necessary – people talk over each other, need to remember to mute microphones, and we also tend to see more casual dress and participants’ homes in the background. The whole atmosphere changes.    [caption id="attachment_19474" align="aligncenter" width="1549"]The need for rapid adaptation from a built for purpose physical space to working from home is not limited to the UK. Left: An image of the empty Hackney Town Hall, UK. Right: A recent council meeting in Clinton, USA The need for rapid adaptation from a built for purpose physical space to working from home is not limited to the UK. Left: An image of the empty Hackney Town Hall, UK. Right: A recent council meeting in Clinton, USA[/caption]

What are the practical problems and solutions of moving council meetings online?

Who is responsible for tech and training? Currently there is no dedicated software to conduct either council or any other democratic meetings. Software decisions usually fall to the IT department, however, because of the urgency of moving online, the responsibility for these decisions fell to the Democratic Services Support Team at A&W. They found a need to train councillors and members of the public who were due to participate in how to use the video conferencing software and digital devices to participate in virtual meetings. Chris says “In some cases, councillors have had comparatively low exposure to modern digital technology, and it is essential that we make sure the training they receive in the necessary applications allows their other, more traditional skills (debate, scrutiny and decision making), to shine through”. Training 70 councillors was, in itself, very resource intensive – imagine what it would be like to train hundreds at larger councils.   Scale and roles have an impact. Council meetings are of different sizes, depending on location and even the subject under discussion. For example, A&W meetings are often 30-60 people, which is relatively small and can work on a call. However, for some other councils these meetings can be much larger (e.g. Birmingham Council with around 300 councillors). As Neil from A&W observes: “In a remote context you can easily control a planning committee of 8 participants, but as the numbers increase, so do the challenges, exponentially.” The roles needed in a virtual context will be, to a degree, highly connected with their scale – facilitating a call with 20 people is not the same as facilitating one with 200+!  New roles. “There’s a need for new roles and new responsibilities in these virtual council meetings,” Liv from Snook says, “and we are only just beginning to understand what these are ”. As Chris describes: “We have identified new technical roles that we would not normally have to consider at traditional meetings. This has meant that we have had to identify additional resources outside of our small Democratic Services Support Team, and train and prepare those people we bring in. In addition to this, traditional roles such as that of the chairman now require different skills and knowledge which has been challenging.” Trade-offs between software and protocol. Most council constitutions require public visibility on how each councillor has voted. In A&W, this is done by councillors verbally confirming their vote. However, in larger councils, registering hundreds of verbal votes one at a time is impractical. The processes councils follow and the tasks required are tied in with the platforms they are using. Infrastructure limitations. Designing around participants’ internet connectivity is a huge challenge. At best it can mean councillors being forced to abstain from voting on issues where they haven’t heard the full debate. The risk increases when the chair or legal counsel’s connection drops. And that’s clearly not the worst that can happen

How can we enable the public to take part – and given that digital inclusiveness is always a problem, what new challenges might arise?

Technology shifts who is being included and excluded. Liv explains: “Physical meetings may exclude parents, disabled people, or simply those living busy lives. Virtual meetings are more likely to exclude older generations or those without access to the technology needed. But overall, virtual meetings may actually be more accessible.”  A less intimidating prospect. Members of the public can now see both the meeting and what participation involves much more easily than they could before. The formality and pomp of physical meetings disappears, making them more approachable and open to all.

How can issues like these be addressed?

The biggest challenge the Snook team found was not the ability of a council team to systematically come up with a solution to every issue outlined above – something they excelled at. It was the sheer amount to think about, and the risk of overlooking or not anticipating something that turned out to be critical. As Chris points out: “In some cases we have protocols for dealing with issues and we can adapt them to the online context. However, there are challenges that you would never ever think about.”  Some councils have been discovering these the hard way. This means greater demands on council resources in a time where they are already considerably overstretched. A new tool. With this in mind, we worked with the A&W team to create an extensive blueprint of every stage of the process – from meeting set-up through post-meeting admin – in granular detail. At every stage the team considered behaviours, hardware, software, governance, and legislative risks. “They shared that what they found incredibly helpful about that”, Liv says, “was that it ensured there was nothing they hadn’t thought about – it was a very comprehensive lens. It wasn’t about putting something in each cell – in a way the blueprint acted as a checklist for them to make sure they’d thought about everything and proposed solutions”.   [caption id="attachment_19472" align="aligncenter" width="1999"]A&W Remote Council Meetings Blueprint A&W Remote Council Meetings Blueprint[/caption] A user manual for governance. Ultimately, a blueprint is a difficult thing to follow, and not every participant needs to know the whole process. Liv told us, “We need a big picture of the whole process, broken down into the different roles required, so that people can see where their role fits in, including members of the public. What we really need to exist is a user manual for each member of a council meeting”.  [caption id="attachment_19473" align="aligncenter" width="1999"]Sketch of A&W remote council meeting process by roles Sketch of A&W remote council meeting process by roles[/caption] Local variation. Such a blueprint would be different for individual councils. “ While there is a centralised Local Government Act 2000 that outlines a strong common framework for what should and shouldn’t be done, implementation is different at a local level. They are currently changing the governance to reflect the current situation”, Liam says.  At Snook, we are deeply interested in understanding what kind of long-term impact will result from these changes and interventions. While it’s likely that many councils will move back towards physical meetings, there are aspects of online provision that we would like to see pursued, especially its ability to make meetings more approachable and accessible. We see digital not just as a lever to transform delivery channels, but as a creator of new activities and roles which will shape what governance will look like around the world.  As Neil puts it: “Whilst the current legislation allowing remote meetings is only in place until next year, we’re planning on some form of remote participation being here to stay. Before the lockdown, we had pressures from those who welcomed remote participation and those who opposed it. In demonstrating what is possible, the opposition has dropped and we’re in the process of shaping the new normal”.  We’d like to thank Adur and Worthing Council for involving us in this interesting piece of work, and Benedict and Marta from Rival for partnering with us on the research for this post. If you’d like to get involved in discussing redesign of democratic processes for inclusion and accessibility in the digital age, please get in touch. [post_title] => Reflections on Covid-19: Exploring remote democratic decision making [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => exploring-remote-democratic-decision-making [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://wearesnook.com/our-principles-for-digital-inclusivity/ [post_modified] => 2020-05-18 15:36:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-05-18 15:36:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19451 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [62] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19441 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2020-04-30 16:17:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-04-30 16:17:46 [post_content] => We are excited to share with you that an early version of the service recipes for charities platform is now live and is the result of the collaboration of Catalyst with FutureGov, Snook and CAST It collects practical examples to help charities reuse and learn from one another’s digital services. We have been referring to those as recipes: they show the ingredients and steps needed to deliver a service. By charities, for charities, for inspiration or straightforward implementation. These recipes can be reused as they are, or tweaked as necessary. We believe that re-using existing tools and code can help charities solve service design and delivery problems more quickly than building a tool from scratch. It can save time and money, and build a team’s confidence along the way. The platform is in Alpha stage: that means it’s a real thing, it is publicly available and can be used by people, but it is still likely to develop further in response to feedback. We have been sharing this concept with some charities over the last few months and decided to build it, as the feedback we received was overwhelmingly positive. We are aware though, that the devil is in the detail. That’s why we are sharing it openly. By getting it live, we are hoping to boost our learning process for what works and what doesn’t so that we can iterate more quickly based on the findings. We are launching it today with a small but exciting collection of service recipes, with more to follow in the next few weeks. The recipes were contributed by a range of charities, some who have had a strong digital focus for years and others who are just starting out. We Are With You are offering webchat services in order to support people dealing with addiction and mental health issues. It took one week to get the web chat services up and running and demand for the service has remained steady at 50-70 sessions a day. With You's recipe includes how they selected their tools, set up and are staffing the service as well as guidance around how to implement web chat successfully. Young Somerset support young adults with 1-to-1 therapy. In response to COVID-19, they quickly shifted their service online and were able to find a solution that met NHS governance and security requirements. In Young Somerset's recipe, you’ll find how they made the decision to move online, what tools and software they used and risks they considered due to the now remote delivery of the service.  Being Woman offer women digital skills training  to increase inclusion and equality. To help people stay connected during lock down they distributed tablets and laptops and helped them gain skills and confidence to get online. Being Woman’s recipe covers the learning resources and digital inclusion schemes they partnered with, such as  Learn My Way, Make It Click and  Devicesdotnow. We want to thank all the charities who have already provided us with service recipes about the challenges that they’re currently facing and services they are providing.  We will add more recipes every week and we need organisations like yours to share the digital solutions you have had success with or that you are trialling at the moment. With each recipe shared, the library will grow and it’s our hope that you’ll also benefit from it too in the near future.  To share your recipes, you can fill in this form in or send us an email at recipes@thecatalyst.org.uk For platforms and initiatives such as this around reuse, to succeed we need to know if the recipes have helped you and your organisation build a new service, or improve an existing one. We would like to hear from you, whether for general feedback or to share how you used an existing recipe.  Finally, if  you want to learn more about service recipes and our thinking behind it, we talked about service patterns and life events here. This was originally posted by the wonderful team working across the catalyst. [post_title] => Service recipes: our new tool to help you get inspired by how other charities deliver services [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => service-recipes-our-new-tool-to-help-you-get-inspired-by-how-other-charities-deliver-services [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-04-30 16:17:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-04-30 16:17:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19441 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [63] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19410 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-04-17 13:46:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-04-17 13:46:32 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

We are looking to recruit a Head of Digital to provide strong leadership, direction and coaching within our digital design department.  Our digital design team is composed of interaction designers, full-stack developers, technical leads, content designers and data experts.  We’re looking for someone to take a lead in growing our capacity, developing the service offer, supporting the tech leads, and ensuring we’ve got the right skills and tools to do the job.  We are looking for someone with previous senior developer experience, who is keen to move to a more strategic management position.  You should have proven experience of growing, nurturing and running a digital product design and delivery team. You will have the authority and experience to make key decisions on technical matters such as code base, architecture and hosting.  The role will ensure the team does their best work, maintaining consistency of high quality delivery across our projects. You will help push us to meet our mission by designing services that have real impact on people’s lives. You will work with our Head of Design to grow and develop our product development and design practice across Snook’s studios and our partners. You will help set a digital product approach for Snook that ties in with our aims and principles, and sets direction for the way that we design digital services and products across the wider team.

Requirements 

You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, but all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter and your notice period. Send your CV and cover letter as pdfs to 'apply-92573e2358ac01@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: Head of Digital”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.    [post_title] => **CLOSED** Head of Digital [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => head-of-digital [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-16 11:01:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-16 11:01:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19410 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [64] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19392 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-04-16 11:18:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-04-16 11:18:02 [post_content] =>

Imagine going about your normal day without access to the internet. At the time of writing, during the COVID-19 lock down that’s more inconceivable than usual with most of us relying on it to do our work, shopping and socialising. But for many, even in ‘normal’ times, access to digital services is highly problematic and contributes to their exclusion from essential services.

Those who depend on the government’s digital services need internet access to sustain their lives. Snook have met people who couldn’t log into their Universal Credit accounts and lost benefits as a result, and there are countless children who are expected to do schoolwork online but have no suitable device to do so at home. By excluding people digitally, we are excluding them from society.

The crisis has precipitated a lot of progress in digital inclusion. From Government Zero to DevicesDotNow to No One Left Behind. A lot of organisations are working together to quickly help people get online and get the support they need during this crisis. Their work builds on decades of experience of working to bridge the digital gap.

The Scottish Government commissioned Snook to synthesise existing research into recommendations for digital inclusion. This research, much of which is Snook’s own, ranges from digital rights with parents and carers, to digital exclusion of children in poverty, to the experiences of getting online for older people.

This is a summary of our findings, which can be found in full in our report, unpacking the complexity of digital inclusion. We see it as a useful resource to provide context to the work going on today.

The key factors in digital inclusion

1. Low cost and accessible connections

Access to the internet is the foundation of digital participation, and people often have limited power over this. Home broadband packages can be confusing, with hidden fees and people feeling forced into contracts. Public Wi-Fi provisions lack bandwidth, block access to certain applications such as streaming services, and are time limited. We met a woman who knew all the hotspots, — as well as their time limits — at cafes and other public spaces on her route to work. She would plan her journey so she could get access to essential services on her commute. Smartphone data, particularly on pay-as-you-go, is the most expensive way to access the internet, and people report struggling to manage their data usage.

“Some people will go without claiming benefits because they have to apply online. People don’t have the IT skills to do this, or access to computers or internet at home. Out of the 50 people we support, only 2 people have home broadband and Wi-Fi, although half of the young people have data on their smartphones.” — Carr Gomm support worker (Online Identity Assurance, 2018)

2. Motivations to get online

People who don’t currently have access need a good reason to go through the rigmarole of getting online. Personal needs such as contacting relatives, shopping or doing homework are strong motivating factors. When people feel forced to go online by certain services they feel disempowered, which isn’t the best place to start learning from. Even when given access to devices, new users without a clear drive of their own are unlikely to use them. For people living with a disability, there is a greater motivation to use digital services, as they are often more inclusive and user friendly by default. However, more is needed to make services accessible and joined up, for instance by encouraging more face-to-face interactions..

3. Access to appropriate (connected) devices

Owning a device allows a person to use it at home and in their own time, and usually increases their digital skills and confidence. Issues are raised around privacy and security if they have to share a device. In families, children are often the driver for acquiring a device to help them with school work and to feel included in their peer group. Providing devices is a quick and easy way to contribute towards digital inclusion, but it needs to go hand in hand with the provision of an internet connection.

4. Skills, confidence and safety

The fourth piece of the puzzle is about giving people the skills and confidence to get online. Most adults worry about how organisations access, process and share their personal data. Technology can be seen as a tool for abuse, but that doesn’t stop people from sharing information, opinions, and photos freely on social media. Despite high levels of concern for child safety, parents don’t trust safety measures such as parenting controls. All these fears can contribute to an aversion to getting connected.

What needs to happen to include everyone in the digital world?

Training needs to be offered and exchanged

Some people get digital skills through employment or education, while others rely on those in their immediate circle. Every person’s needs and motivations are different. This suggests that tailored, task-based training works best. Learnings from community-centred initiatives need to be shared, and skills could be exchanged between user groups.

Our digital rights need to be clear

As more services become digital, we can expect to see more people encouraged to use technology. Concerns for online safety can be a barrier for people choosing to go online. More knowledge is needed around how people can protect themselves online so that they can navigate the online world safely.

Connectivity is a basic need

People make light of the idea that digital should be the most basic of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs — over food, water, shelter, and warmth — but there is evidence that people do, to an extent, prioritise connectivity over food and comfort. Some refugees, for instance, are known to have asked for Wi-Fi or charging services ahead of food or water on arrival in a new country.

When people lose access to the internet though disruptive life events such as unemployment or illness, their connectivity is not addressed as a key need to help them get back on their feet. Regulating connectivity as the fourth utility will help reduce inequalities and allow more and more people to maximise their digital impact.

The full report can be found here.

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About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

We are looking to recruit a Head of Service Design to provide strong leadership and coaching to our growing design and delivery teams. The role will be key to ensuring the team do their best work, maintaining consistency of high quality delivery across our projects and pushing us to meet our mission by designing services that have real impact on people’s lives. You will champion user-centred design and research within Snook, with our clients and partners, and across the wider design industry.  You will work closely with our Head of Design to grow and develop our service design practice across Snook’s studios and our partners.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit PDFs of a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to 'apply-b6c875b4e11701@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: Head of Service Design”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.  [post_title] => **CLOSED** Head of Service Design [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => head-of-service-design [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-26 08:57:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-26 08:57:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19371 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [66] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19326 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-04-03 14:29:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-04-03 14:29:26 [post_content] =>

A crisis like Covid-19 requires urgent emergency responses. With crises come feelings of panic and we see lots of people running quickly towards the problem to help. But we know those feelings of panic tend to inhibit us to short-term thinking only.

There are various practical ways we’ve been addressing just getting on with the work we’re already doing at Snook. We’re conducting remote user research with control room operators — designing a rapid response to emergency calls seems more pressing than ever when the volume of calls they’re handling is unprecedented. We’re also continuing our work with British Sign Language communities and the National Citizen Service to improve their services. We’re running workshops using video conferencing-delivering a training session in service design for NHS National Services Scotland and convening with 100 designers and charities to look at ways to combine forces in their response to Covid-19. But it’s not just approaches to working remotely. There’s a bigger picture emerging of a world that may have to be restructured radically and will require a considered, long-term strategy to solving all the challenges which we will face globally in the wake of this.

Setting our response principles

We’ve been holding working sessions to discuss our response as a team to Covid-19. At first, we all felt a sense of panic — what can we do to help now? Apart from staying indoors and joining our local volunteer networks, where can we help? The usual questions came up, like asking if civic society needs an app to better organise themselves or building smart emergency response services? The answer was, and is, no. In the second week, we started to understand the scale of the challenge hanging over us and help clients organise and think through their emergency response. As we hit our third week of working in this ‘new normal’, we recognised we needed to set some principles about how we can support our clients past and present. We need to move from a crisis response state to being a calm supportive partner who’s looking ahead.

Our principles and approach to designing in times of crisis:

1. Show what’s possible

  Person shouting through a megaphone There are a huge number of things that need to be completely rethought right now, but bringing about these types of changes can seem overwhelming. For example, making internet access universally free to all those who are currently classified as vulnerable seemed like a pipedream. But we’re taking an approach to change a small thing and seed the bigger idea. We worked quickly with Nominet to get mobile phone operators to zero rate access to nhs.uk, so everyone can access accurate, up-to-date health information during the pandemic. A small win — and now they’re stepping up to provide access to a whole host of sites with new data packages. But this is just the start of a wider job of ensuring everyone is included in a world where there’s a growing assumption that just putting everything online is the answer. It’s not that simple. An estimated 1 in 10 households in the UK have no access to the internet. There are school pupils and students who are currently being told to do their lessons online and are simply unable to. Many elderly people feel they lack the skills to use computers, and the number of homeless is steadily rising, and while some may have phones, they frequently run out of data. These people are being allowed to fall through the cracks right now. But, with this challenge, many small prototypes working in the open can seed the change, and we’ll continue to press for these, linking them to wider positive agendas.

2. Balance immediate needs with the long-term view

Covid-19 will have a dramatic impact beyond the next week, and the month after. Not only specifically in the new normal of physically distancing that has been forced upon us but also in our ability to think, connect and live differently in the future. Who would have thought that in a matter of weeks, we could house everyone who is homeless? Or reduce our C02 emissions so quickly? In the short term, we’re supporting organisations to rethink service delivery with new Government regulations in the now — to support the people at highest risk (the elderly, the immunocompromised). But with this, we must ensure we also take a longer-term view and consider what might come next. There’s then the medium term. What’s coming in the next 4–6 weeks. Data from some of the most highly affected areas in the world such as Italy, shows us that the coming month is about to get much worse and we’ve heard from clients that workforces are depleting by up to a third in vital services like children’s social care. How we staff and continue to deliver vital services needs to be considered now and over the next few months as staff self-isolate or go off sick due to the virus. In the longer term, we’ll see much bigger impacts. How will people who’ve been in self-isolation for months feel? What are the long-term mental health impacts? How will a frontline workforce working in emergency mode feel in six months time after experiencing death, sickness and fear every day? What will happen to our food chains when we rely on much of our produce being imported and transport has been halted? What happens to homeless people we’ve housed in this period when the curve flattens? There are so many questions that need a longer-term view but need to be considered now, so we can start designing for these new needs and scenarios before they arrive on our doorstep.

3. Listen first, look second, build last

Our perspective is to listen first, understand needs, look at what exists then build if needed. We don’t know best. There are vast networks of grassroots efforts, civic sector organisations and charities that know their people and areas well. There are service providers who are experts in what they deliver and the people they support. We’ve seen a host of new services spring up, sometimes outside the organisation’s core expertise, because they saw a need and tried to fill it. We’re keen to help organisations understand their specific skill sets and how they can be put to use alongside others, stopping them from pivoting everything to solve the immediate crisis. If there’s a clear need for something new which no one else can meet, then build it. But listen first, and find out whether someone already does what’s needed and connect them up. Developing a new product or service at this time isn’t needed unless it helps with convening safely or delivering an existing service online. It will just add to the noise.

4. Meet immediate needs safely

Where there is a need, and something does need to be built, it must still meet regulations and good design principles. Yas, research and design will need to move at pace to meet new daily Government announcements or emergent societal needs. But a crisis doesn’t mean throwing out all data, ethical, privacy and accessibility principles. We have basic accessibility guidelines and tools to build quick services that work for people. We have data ethics workbooks to help us ask the questions we should ask to ensure that what we’re doing safeguards users. Organisations like the Information Commissioner’s office have provided supportive statements to help organisations get online at speed — assuring them that they won’t be penalised, but careful to ensure privacy and data standards are not dropped entirely. Even in a crisis, we should not ignore safeguarding and ethical data practice. We must think through our service designs to ensure we put no one in harm’s way.

5. Shape challenges, convene responses

Through our listening, we’re hearing common challenges from all types of organisations. Some of the simpler questions are how to deliver a support programme online. Or get digital access for the people they support. Or figure out how to support people paying for goods delivered to them who aren’t online.We can help by finding common problems and shaping these, convening the right people to solve them and publishing this knowledge. We’re about to bring this principle to life in our work across the Catalyst. This is an alliance of civil society organisations, funders, and digital agencies, incubated on behalf of the Centre for Acceleration of Social Technology. We’ve been working with them and Futuregov to build a list of common transactions that charities and civil society organisations might deliver and how these might be delivered online. We’re going to convene groups of service providers to discuss, share and publish how they’ve taken their services online so others can learn from this, in a series of patterns.

6. Stimulate learning loops

In a crisis, we have a tendency to deliver at speed then rush off to put the next fire out. But many of us are delivering services in ways we have never delivered before. We are learning what works, what doesn’t and what to do differently. We have a role to play in stimulating learning cycles and sharing them with others. Only together, can we learn how to meet the present and near-future needs well. We’re encouraging our clients to keep a short learning log during this time so they can look back and share what’s working and what needs to change. Last week, we held an online conversation involving charities, digital experts, designers, change-makers and commissioners. Someone said after the call that they’d been inspired to make sure they document their learnings, as they’re trying out lots of new ways of delivering their service remotely. Let’s keep inspiring those learnings.

Looking further into the future

We’re mindful of how often great shifts in society can happen after upheavals like this. The NHS was founded in the wake of the second world war. It cost an enormous amount of money — but aren’t we grateful for it now? It also took a great long-term vision and a commitment to the common good. The belief that things can be different and that we can design them to be better for everyone and everything on the planet seemed like a fantasy only a few weeks ago. But in the past two weeks, people are having to face a new reality that’s being foisted upon them. There’s a future to plan for beyond the pandemic. We need to reflect on what we want to keep from how we used to live and what must change to make a fairer, more sustainable future for all. We’ll be considering this in a series of posts soon. In the meantime, do get in touch if you’d like to get involved in designing the best response to the present — and the future — together. [post_title] => We need long-term thinking now more than ever [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => we-need-long-term-thinking-now-more-than-ever [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-04-06 16:43:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-04-06 16:43:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19326 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [67] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19269 [post_author] => 91 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 19:42:13 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 19:42:13 [post_content] => UK mobile operators give free access to NHS websites As service designers, our job is to design services — for the people who use them, and the staff and organisations who deliver them. We research user needs. Analyse impact. Look for new solutions to improve experiences for everyone involved. But we need to go further. It has to be our duty to tackle the barriers that keep users from accessing services, even when those barriers are outside of our remit. If that means pushing an idea to the heart of government, stakeholders and corporates, then that’s what we need to do! We are absolutely thrilled to hear that one of those ideas has come to fruition: Government Zero; a simple but effective idea to give free access to essential services.

The NHS has announced that “Vodafone, EE/ BT, 02 and Three are giving all their mobile customers across the UK free access to www.nhs.uk so that they can get the latest health information without worrying about data costs.”

The digital transformation of services has delivered value to the majority of users, but places services behind what feels like a paywall for those who don’t have appropriate access to the Internet. Digital exclusion goes hand-in-hand with social, economic and political exclusion. It is also complex: people need the appropriate device, connection, skills, confidence, motivation and the ability to maintain those through changing circumstances. Addressing these complex needs will take time, so we need to look for intermediate solutions. Time and time again, whilst doing research, we’ve met people who had a mobile phone but couldn’t afford a monthly contract, and frequently ran out of data on their pay-as-you-go. Their stories stay with us: the woman in Scotland who had a mental map of all the wifi hotspots she could access on the way to work, hopping on and off buses to use a cafe’s free wifi for a bit before moving on to the next location. The estimated 1 million children who are routinely set homework that requires access to the internet, which they don’t have at home. The man in West Sussex who missed the deadline for submitting his application for universal credit because he ran out of data and ended up homeless. Just a few of the people who make up a huge sector of society who struggle to use digital services. Zero-rating means users can still access essential services even if they don’t have data on their phones — just like they can call 999 or 111. We know it’s feasible, as mobile operators let customers access their website to top up their account. It’s also been done before with projects such as Wikipedia Zero and Facebook Zero, or for Childline. We need to tread carefully and comply with the net neutrality principle. This requires Internet service providers (ISPs) to treat all Internet communications equally so that users can freely choose from a wide range of information sources. For this reason, ISPs must self-report zero-rated pages to OFCOM. The concept of Government Zero focuses on the services where there is one source of truth: there is only one place to apply for a passport or for a given benefit, so net neutrality doesn’t apply. It’s a ‘big picture’ idea that was propelled to the forefront in the past week by the current Coronavirus situation. UK residents have an urgent need to access reliable information in order to reduce misinformation, and potentially lighten the load on health services. Government Zero will mean that anyone with access to a device can obtain reliable, accurate information from the NHS about the coronavirus situation whatever their circumstances. Over a number of projects, Nominet and Snook have built a strong relationship. Together, we reached out to partners across industry, government, health and organisations involved in digital inclusion to enable Government Zero to be brought to the fore at this critical moment. A whirlwind week saw a growing network of stakeholders, mobile operators, government departments and health services work together, share their knowledge, reach out to their contacts and explore the technical feasibility — leading to today’s announcement. This is the product of a 10-day relay between people with a single-minded commitment to making sure that the national response serves everyone in society. Prototypes come in all shapes and forms, and this is certainly an unusual way to test a new concept! It will enable mobile operators and service providers to evaluate the traffic, cost, impact and implementation of this initiative — paving the way for a more permanent solution to open access to all government digital services, in particular those serving the most vulnerable. Now the real work continues to tackle the wider issue of digital inclusion systematically. Until then, keep washing your hands! https://medium.com/wearesnook/government-zero-how-might-citizens-have-unfettered-access-to-government-digital-services-564f65f2c767 [post_title] => Digital inclusion in times of crisis  [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => digital-inclusion-in-times-of-crisis%e2%80%8a [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-19 10:09:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-19 10:09:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19269 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [68] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19308 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 14:45:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 14:45:09 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As a Senior Interaction Designer at Snook, you will be responsible for taking a lead role in projects with a focus on creating intuitive, inclusive and accessible design solutions.  Your work will include designing holistic services that work for a wide range of people, and the design of digital products and supporting the digital design team and wider disciplines to embrace the importance of accessible interaction design.  Your work will require collaboration across our user centered disciplines and go beyond the screen.  You will design in the open, leading the communication of design decisions within the project team and clients, championing the importance of design and user needs.  You’ll relish working closely with our clients and partners, supporting our approach to new business opportunities, and in co-designing services and products with users.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to 'apply-d589d8545fed01@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: Senior Interaction Designer”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours. [post_title] => Senior Interaction Designer/UX [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => senior-interaction-designer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-02 14:52:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-02 14:52:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19308 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [69] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19307 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 14:44:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 14:44:55 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As a Senior User Researcher at Snook, you will lead and participate in multidisciplinary project teams and will be responsible for ensuring our design projects are rooted in a deep understanding of users and their needs. Your work will include designing and delivering a range of research activities and methods, and communicating actionable insights to project teams and clients.  Your work will require collaboration across our user-centered disciplines and go beyond the screen.  You will work in the open, communicating the research findings within the project team and clients, championing the importance of user research and user needs.  You’ll relish working closely with our clients and partners in co-designing services and products with users. You will work with the Head of User Research and the Head of Design to grow and develop our user research practice across Snook’s studios and our partners.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however, all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to 'apply-a94a83c4b55d01@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: Senior User Researcher”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.  [post_title] => **CLOSED** Senior User Researcher [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => senior-user-researcher [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-15 16:11:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-15 16:11:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19307 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [70] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19304 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 14:44:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 14:44:28 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

We are looking to recruit a Head of User Research who can expand our research capability, develop our research and research ops practice, train the existing team, and deliver high quality research outputs for our external and internal projects, ensuring that we take an evidence-based approach to design. You will work closely with our Head of Design to grow and develop our user research practice across Snook’s studios and our partners.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to 'apply-0aee38cc5f8e01@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: Head of User Research”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.  [post_title] => **CLOSED** Head of User Research [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => head-of-user-research [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-26 08:58:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-26 08:58:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19304 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [71] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19303 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 14:43:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 14:43:53 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As a Delivery Manager at Snook you will be responsible for overseeing the delivery of client and internal projects. You’ll be responsible for helping run the rhythms and rituals of our projects, supporting project leads to deliver on time, on budget and to high standards. You’ll also support the Head of Development and wider Delivery Team with project resourcing and scoping. As a Delivery Manager, you'll be experienced in agile and sprint based delivery on a diverse range of projects. This will range from consultancy projects, designing public services to software development.  You'll have excellent project management skills, know when to challenge and when to listen. You'll be able to build relationships with clients at a senior level.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries.   You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:  

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

Please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV and one page cover letter. Send your CV and cover letter as pdfs to 'apply-fb928efdfc6b01@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: Delivery Manager”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Please include your notice period. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.  Deadline: 30th June. Interviews starting 8th July. Please note: This role requires Security Clearance and applicants will need to have been resident in the UK for the past three years. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.  [post_title] => **CLOSED** Delivery Manager [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => delivery-manager-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-26 08:58:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-26 08:58:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19303 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [72] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19293 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 14:42:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 14:42:52 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As a User Researcher at Snook, you will work in multidisciplinary project teams and will be responsible for ensuring our design projects are rooted in a deep understanding of users and their needs. Your work will include participating in a range of research activities and methods, and communicating actionable insights to project teams.  Your work will require collaboration across our user-centered disciplines and go beyond the screen.  You will work in the open, communicating the user research findings within the project team and with clients. You’ll relish working closely with our clients and partners in co-designing services and products with users.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to 'apply-7e5fcff77f7b01@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: User Researcher”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.  [post_title] => **CLOSED** User Researcher [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => user-researcher [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-15 16:12:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-15 16:12:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19293 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [73] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19265 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 14:42:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 14:42:10 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As an Interaction Designer at Snook, you will be responsible for participating in projects with a focus on creating intuitive, inclusive and accessible design solutions.  Your work will include designing holistic services that work for a wide range of people, and the design of digital products and supporting the digital design team and wider disciplines to embrace the importance of accessible interaction design.  Your work will require collaboration across our user centered disciplines and go beyond the screen.  You will design in the open, communicating the design decisions within the project team and clients, championing the importance of design and user needs.  You’ll relish working closely with our clients and partners in co-designing services and products with users.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to 'apply-4456795eac5e01@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: Interaction Designer”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours. [post_title] => Interaction Designer/UX [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => interaction-designer-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-02 14:52:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-02 14:52:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19265 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [74] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19238 [post_author] => 93 [post_date] => 2020-03-12 17:48:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-12 17:48:25 [post_content] => We're hiring at Snook - not just a few roles - lots of them. We’re looking to grow our team in a number of areas because we’ve got a big challenge on our hands.

Why is Snook here?

We’re on a mission to design a world where people and planet thrive. We think deep and look wide to transform the systems that shape our world. That means everything, everywhere – from exploring healthcare’s digital future to tearing down barriers to accessible transport. Bit by bit, we’re making our world more human – so everyone can thrive. We believe that when our world is built around people, it makes everyone happier, healthier, and more productive. Right now, parts of our world aren’t like that. They’re not designed for or with the people who live in them. This creates barriers that make life harder – from small, everyday experiences, to the bigger systems that shape our lives. We’re looking for people to help us make the world more accessible, more sustainable, more effective: more human.

What are we shooting for? Our 5 mission areas

Our missions are like shared dreams we are chasing. They are still in development but we’re crafting key questions that help us aim towards realising them. They are;

1. Thriving planet

2. Next-era government

3. Good business

4. Healthy lives

5. Communities for all

If all this sounds good to you, then come and join our team. We work both in the practical stabilising space (doing the hard work that needs to be done now to make things accessible in the current system) and the emergent space (thinking and articulating what a different system might look like in the future). Thanks to Cassie Robinson for her articulation of emergent models and roles.

What are we working on right now?

Who are we looking for?

We have lots of roles going as our team grows. We break down our roles into: Heads of - support the studio discipline and offer to grow  Principals - leading experts in their field with significant experience  Senior/Leads - experienced practitioners who can take a lead on projects Mid-weight - experienced practitioners Associate - entry level roles  We’re on the lookout for;

Delivery Managers

To support our design teams in delivering project outcomes and work with our amazing clients.  View our Delivery Manager job role.

Head of User Research

To grow and manage our user research team, building and developing our user research practice. View our Head of User Research job role.

User Researchers (entry level to senior) 

Looking for great researchers of all kinds with knowledge in the user research discipline and backgrounds in social sciences or experience in the field. View our User Researcher and Senior User Researcher job roles.

Head of Service Design

To grow and manage our team of service designers, building our practice in Service Design. View our Head of Service Design job role. 

Service Designer

We’re looking for people who are great at designing holistic services that work for a wide range of people. View our Service Designer job role.

Head of Digital 

To grow and manage our digital design team which consists of interaction, developers, technical leads, developers, building our practice in digital design. View our Head of Digital job role.

Content Designer

We need people who have experience of designing and testing language in the context of product and service design.  View our Content Designer job role.

Interaction Designer (entry level to senior) 

People who are great at designing accessible products and services, with a flair for great online experiences and a consideration for the user experience around them. View our Interaction Designer and Senior Interaction Designer job roles.

Digital Product Designer

Experienced designers who are great at shaping product and service direction to join our digital design team.  Job role details coming soon!

Technical Lead (senior/principal) 

A great all rounder who understands and has experience in technical development, data and enjoys unpicking complex challenges and can make simplifying complexity. Job role details coming soon!

Accessibility and Inclusion Design Lead and entry level/specialist 

People with a passion for products and services that are inclusive and accessible to all. We’re looking for people with specific experience in helping design and audit digital services that are WCAG 2.1 proficient but also go beyond this into considering inclusive design practices in all of our work View our Accessibility Specialist and Accessibility & Inclusive Design Lead job roles.

How does this all fit together?

We’re happy to share our organisation chart above. We’ve recognised a need for a new phase of growth which ensures we have a wider range of skills to meet the emergent needs of our clients and ensure we have the right support in place for our team by hiring heads of our disciplines to grow, nurture and train our teams.

How can I apply?

When our adverts go out they will specify requirements and skills for each role. But, we’re looking for a range of people and are open to all kinds of experience so please do apply.  If you’ve applied before, please do so again.  They will all be appearing on our jobs page and linked to this post as they go live. We recently overhauled our recruitment process to help ensure we’re building a diverse and inclusive team. Throughout the recruitment process, we’ll be providing applicants with any support they need. We actively encourage applications from a diverse range of backgrounds.  Please send your application to jobs@wearesnook.com with the title Hire me: Role Title (and your role you’re shooting for). All our jobs are advertised for at least 6 weeks but we are undertaking rolling recruitment so please do send in your applications. We will keep the posts open for as long as we need, to find the right people. [post_title] => We're hiring! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => were-hiring [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://wearesnook.com/inclusive-recruitment/ [post_modified] => 2020-04-17 14:02:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-04-17 14:02:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19238 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [75] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19153 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2020-03-05 15:37:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-05 15:37:50 [post_content] => Here at Snook we love books. So much so that we didn't manage to keep it to a top 5 as originally planned. So, for World Book Day here are 13 books about design and the world that we love: 1. Hope In The Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities — Rebecca Solnit 2. The Craftsman — Richard Sennett 3. Design as Politics — Tony Fry 4. Good Services — Lou Downe 5. The Death & Life of the Great American Cities — Jane Jacobs 6. Braiding Sweetgrass — Robin Wall Kimmerer 7. Exhalation — Ted Chiang 8. Doughnut Economics — Kate Raworth 9. From What is to What If — Rob Hopkins 10. Radical Help — Hilary Cottam 11. Wabi-Sabi for Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers — Leonard Koren 12. Thinking in Systems — Deborah H. Meadows 13. Dark Matter & Trojan Horses — Dan Hill [post_title] => 13 books about design and the world for World Book Day [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 13-books-about-design-and-the-world-for-world-book-day [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-05 16:23:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-05 16:23:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19153 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [76] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18999 [post_author] => 91 [post_date] => 2019-12-10 12:25:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-10 12:25:51 [post_content] => Matilda’s background spans youth work, activism, education and creative event production. After graduating in English Literature, Matilda spent time in Athens working in a community centre, supporting refugees with language lessons, childcare and legal needs. When she came back to London, she completed Year Here - a post-grad committed to tackling society's toughest problems. When she’s not at Snook, she runs Split Banana; a social enterprise that provides relevant and inclusive sex and relationship education to young people. Matilda is passionate about equipping young people with the skills and knowledge they need to navigate the complexities of adult life. Outside of work, you’ll find Matilda campaigning for environmental justice, organising fun, cycling on London’s quiet-ways, putting the world to rights over pints and spending time with her four younger siblings. [post_title] => Matilda Lawrence-Jubb [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => matilda-lawrence-jubb [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 14:10:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 14:10:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18999 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [77] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18951 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2019-12-04 23:18:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-04 23:18:15 [post_content] =>

Snook — Terms of Use

PLEASE READ THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS CAREFULLY BEFORE USING THIS SITE

Who we are and how to contact us

www.wearesnook.com is a site operated by We Are Snook Limited (“We”). We are registered in Scotland under company number SC373366 and have our registered office at 84 Miller Street, Glasgow G1 1DT, which is also our main trading address. We are a limited company. To get in touch please use one of the options here.

By using our site you accept these terms

By using our site, you confirm that you accept these terms of use and that you agree to comply with them. If you do not agree to these terms, please do not use our site. We recommend that you print a copy of these terms for future reference.

We may make changes to these terms

We amend these terms from time to time. Every time you wish to use our site, please check these terms to ensure you understand the terms that apply at that time. These terms were most recently updated in September 2019.

We may make changes to our site

We may update and change our site from time to time, for example to reflect changes to our users’ needs.

We may suspend or withdraw our site

Our site is made available free of charge. We do not guarantee that our site, or any content on it, will always be available or be uninterrupted. We may suspend or withdraw or restrict the availability of all or any part of our site for business and operational reasons. We will try to give you reasonable notice of any suspension or withdrawal. You are also responsible for ensuring that all persons who access our site through your internet connection are aware of these terms of use and other applicable terms and conditions, and that they comply with them.

You must keep your account details safe

If you choose, or you are provided with, a user identification code, password or any other piece of information as part of our security procedures, you must treat such information as confidential. Please don’t disclose it to any third party. We have the right to disable any user identification code or password, whether chosen by you or allocated by us, at any time, if in our reasonable opinion you have failed to comply with any of the provisions of these terms of use. If you know or suspect that anyone other than you knows your user identification code or password, please promptly notify us.

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We are the owner of or have the right to use the intellectual property rights in our site, including the material published on it.  Those works are protected by copyright laws and treaties around the world. All such rights are reserved. You may print off one copy, and may download extracts, of any page(s) from our site for your personal use and you may draw the attention of others within your organisation to content posted on our site. You cannot modify the paper or digital copies of any materials you have printed off or downloaded in any way, and cannot use any illustrations, photographs, video or audio sequences or any graphics separately from any accompanying text. If you do you material from our site, then our status (and that of any identified contributors) as the authors of content on our site must always be acknowledged. You cannot use any part of the content on our site for commercial purposes without obtaining a licence to do so from us or our licensors. If you print off, copy or download any part of our site in breach of these terms of use, your right to use our site will cease immediately and we will require you either to return or destroy any copies of the materials you have made.

Do not rely on information on this site

The content on our site is provided for general information only. It is not intended to amount to advice on which you should rely. You should obtain professional or specialist advice before taking, or refraining from, any action on the basis of the content on our site. Although we make reasonable efforts to update the information on our site, we make no representations, warranties or guarantees, whether express or implied, that the content on our site is accurate, complete or up to date.

We are not responsible for websites we link to

Where our site contains links to other sites and resources provided by third parties, these links are provided for your information only. Such links should not be interpreted as approval by us of those linked websites or information you may obtain from them. We have no control over the contents of those sites or resources.

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This website may include information and materials uploaded by other users of the site, including to bulletin boards and chat rooms. This information and these materials have not been verified or approved by us. The views expressed by other users on our site do not represent our views or values.

How to complain about content uploaded by other users

If you wish to complain about content uploaded by other users please get in touch.

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Whether you are a consumer or a business user:

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We will only use your personal information as set out in our privacy policy.

We are not responsible for viruses and you must not introduce them

We do not guarantee that our site will be secure or free from bugs or viruses. You are responsible for configuring your information technology, computer programmes and platform to access our site. You should use your own virus protection software. You must not misuse our site by knowingly introducing viruses, trojans, worms, logic bombs or other material that is malicious or technologically harmful. You must not attempt to gain unauthorised access to our site, the server on which our site is stored or any server, computer or database connected to our site. You must not attack our site via a denial-of-service attack or a distributed denial-of service attack. By breaching this provision, you would commit a criminal offence under the Computer Misuse Act 1990. We will report any such breach to the relevant law enforcement authorities and we will co-operate with those authorities by disclosing your identity to them. In the event of such a breach, your right to use our site will cease immediately.

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You may link to our home page, provided you do so in a way that is fair and legal and does not damage our reputation or take advantage of it. Please do not establish a link in such a way as to suggest any form of association, approval or endorsement on our part where none exists. Please do not establish a link to our site in any website that is not owned by you. Please do not frame our site on any other site, or create a link to any part of our site other than the home page. We reserve the right to withdraw linking permission without notice. If you wish to link to or make any use of content on our site other than that set out above, please get in touch.

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If you are a consumer, please note that these terms of use, their subject matter and their formation, are governed by Scottish law. You and we both agree that the courts of Scotland will have exclusive jurisdiction except that if you are a resident of Northern Ireland you may also bring proceedings in Northern Ireland, and if you are resident of England and Wales, you may also bring proceedings in England and Wales. If you are a business, these terms of use, their subject matter and their formation (and any non-contractual disputes or claims) are governed by Scottish law. We both agree to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of Scotland.

Our trade marks are registered

“Snook” is a UK registered trade mark of We Are Snook Limited. You are not permitted to use that trade mark without our approval, unless part of material you are using as permitted under these terms. [post_title] => Terms of use [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => termsandconditions [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-05 09:41:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-05 09:41:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?page_id=18951 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => page [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [78] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18558 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 21:24:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 21:24:37 [post_content] =>
Sarah Drummond talks about learnings and best practice in procuring service design.

I’ve been responding to requests for bids from clients in the form of ITTs, RFQs, Briefs, Proposal requests — for over 10 years, across the public, private and third sector for my company Snook. Even after all this time, I’m still surprised at how some of the small things that our clients do at this stage often make it very hard for them to get good results from the work they commission later on.

Procuring design can be a tricky business if you’ve never done it before, or you’re having to explain what it is and what you need via a procurement department.

It’s even more difficult when you are protected by rules that ensure you don’t discuss the job in hand with potential suppliers .

The market is increasing in size with more people eager to commission Service Design, and even more people trying to sell it.

With an increase in the popularity of Service Design (and ‘design thinking’), I’ve seen a growing trend towards clients asking for service design without necessary knowing what it is or how to integrate it with the other outcomes they want to achieve from a given scope of work. ‘Service Design’ has become a catch all for any kind of change, making it increasingly hard to buy as a service from an agency or supplier.

I want the people I work with to get the best possible results — so I’ve written a 16 (awkward) part guide on how to buy service design.

It’s not exhaustive, but rather a list of some helpful tips that might help you if you’re involved in commissioning or selling service design.

I find that these elements help both sides reach a quicker understanding of what’s needed.

 

1. Be clear about what problem you’re trying to solve

Start with a clear intent, and don’t use ‘Service Design’ as a catch all for all ‘creative’ or ‘innovation’ projects.

Normally it’s good to start with a problem to solve that you have either evidence for but if you don’t know what the problem is, describe the issue you need to explore.

Here are a list of potential starting sentences and project types that I use to describe the different asks that come to us. They help us to define what kind of team we might put on our projects and how we might help answer the ask.

Problem defining and service design: We’re looking to understand why a service we run doesn’t work and how we can improve it

Digital channel shift: We’re looking to exploit digital as a way to scale our service offer

Proposition development: We’re looking to develop a clear product proposition and service to deliver it

Service Design: We need to design a service for the future

Product innovation: We need to think about the wider user experience of a product we deliver

Detail design: We’re looking to design the end-to-end service in detail at a delivery level

Technology driven innovation: We’re looking to understand an opportunity with a new technology we’ve discovered

Capability building: We’re looking to build our capacity to design services and re-align our internal structure to facilitate this

System and problem shaping: We’ve got a big challenge around X and we need to find a way forward to tackle it

User research: We need to better understand if we need to build a service or how we can better meet the needs of a user group.

We need to transform our organisation to centre around our customer needs and set a vision for where we are going.

This isn’t exhaustive but it might help you think about the intent of your project over the process of Service Design.

 

2. Set a budget or investment bracket

People often ask me ‘how much does service design cost’ and the honest answer is — it depends entirely on what you want to achieve.

Not setting a budget leaves an agency in a difficult position to consider how deep you want to go, for what length of time, if you can add on other deliverables that will enhance the final design. It’s like shooting in the dark.

Without a budget we can’t understand your level of investment and are left without understanding if you have the funds for a Ferrari or Fiat Panda. This isn’t about selling you dead time — we make our client’s budgets work to maximise the value they get for the time they can afford.

Budget can mean the difference in numbers of research participants to how long we spend on shipping the design. A budget range from x to x is fine but at least give the responders somewhere to aim for.

Without this, you end up with either unrealistic budgets where agencies try to over promise or proposals that shoot way beyond what you were looking for or able to invest in.

 

3. Focus on outcomes not outputs

Ensure your brief or tender focuses on outcomes not outputs. When you ask for a report at the end, you’re laying the focus on the delivery of the thing, not on the knowledge you need to make the right decision to deliver or design a service.

Try dropping reports out from your deliverables and instead focus on a KPI or outcome along the lines of ‘We need to have a concrete understanding of the existing user experience so we can take the right decisions on what we need to change’

Be flexible for that output to change, just ensure you map what you need to know at each stage of the project and work collaboratively with your partner to identify the right format as the project begins to close.

Treat the project as a learning experience and consider how your organisation can join the journey of knowledge development. I’m not adverse to writing reports, but if the focus is on an agency to write a report to meet your stakeholder needs, the richness and value of the original research and insight can get lost in producing something that is watered down to the ‘right wording’. If this is really needed, create a separate budget line to support you to write the stakeholder report.

You should place the value and emphasis on learning, rather than on the delivery of outputs. Raw deliverables are much better and ultimately more useful than over produced tools or reports.

When the output is the goal, we lose all value and meaning in what the intention of the project was at the end.

[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="1920"] The team from Letchworth Garden City working with Snook on a design project, learning was baked in from the outset of the council’s team[/caption]

4. Make the space for your team to learn

Service Design is a knowledge and insight game. If you’re bringing someone in-house recognise that you will gain the most value from them by working with them.

Ensure there is time made available for your team, in particular a product lead, delivery manager or individual closely related to delivering the thing you’re working on to join that team’s journey.

Look wider too, who would benefit from what this team are doing? Any good agency will support you to think about that at the outset, a RACI framework can help with that but it is good to look ahead and make the resource available on your side.

This doesn’t mean looking over their shoulder, but join in their research, attend their stand ups and make sure there are regular show and tells for you to hear about the work first hand.

5. Give us time, commission early

It’s down to an agency to only pitch for a job if they know that they can deliver it. However, I’d be worried if anyone can say confidently they can start within two weeks. Does this business have no other work on? I’m regularly being asked to tender within a two week window and ‘start’ the week after.

We say we can start because ultimately, there are always delays. Contracts, recruitment, finding first dates for meetings, the list goes on, and usually by the time it is all worked out everyone is ready to go, so it usually works out. But it isn’t the best start, it’s good to get that all out the way so our prime focus is the job in hand and our team have had time out from the project that just finished to decompress and ready themselves for the next job.

This could all be smoother.

Try to look ahead in your commissioning cycle by thinking two to three months before you want to start. This means you’ll get a fresh team ready to work on your project without trying to finish off other projects.

Ultimately, this is an agency’s responsibility to be ready to deliver, but just look ahead and commission early, it could make work better for everyone.

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="566"] At Snook we often map hypothesis across the project at kick off, building ideas and testing prototypes but they can be really helpful at the outset of a tender process from clients[/caption]

6. Tell us your hypothesis upfront

At the start of any project I map the hypothesis of the project team to gain an understanding of what they think we might find out through the research or what the outcomes of the project might be. It helps us to understand any bias, pre-conceived ideas and recognise any agendas at the table.

It would be really helpful if we knew this when writing a proposal upfront. It helps us to understand what we might want to validate or question from the get go and write a proposal around. Again, any good agency should go through this with you at the outset, however, it is helpful to give the agency more understanding of where your head is at and what they will need to do to validate or break your hypothesis.

 

7. If you’re trying to win a battle make it clear

Often once we’re commissioned, we find out that our work is more of a political piece than a straight up service design project. This is ok, I understand that part of design can be a democratic tool to validate a user need or perspective with evidence, but it’s good to know upfront. When our work needs to be more persuasive then it’s good for us to think about who is good at that kind of work.

If you aren’t going to be open with a brief, find a way to help an agency understand the wider context of what’s going on. There needs to be budget for some of that understanding and context setting so we can do our work well by understanding the politics of the situation early on.

Design skills can be different from consultancy skills and if you’re going to need a persuasive critical friend, we need to look at our team carefully and think about who right people are to help both surface that insight but then communicate it. That is often not the same person.

 

8. Beware over delivery promises

We all lose proposals, but nothing stings more than being told someone else promised double what we did for the same budget.

For me, if someone promises you the world for far less than the majority of other bids, this is a red alert.

I’ve been on the commissioning side and been burned early on in my career when someone promised everything.

Ultimately, they couldn’t deliver, and I found they were working all hours to deliver, which meant in turn, the work was sloppy, they were late for meetings and generally didn’t do a great job on any of the project because they had other projects on to bolster their income.

I’d listen to people who push back on the budget, they probably have enough experience to tell you it’s tight. It’s then yours (and theirs) discretion to go forward with the work on the identified budget or bolster it.

 

9. Remember you’re hiring talent not a process or methods

I’ve lost pitches because ‘our methods’ weren’t clear enough and the competitor had ‘more innovative methods’. Now, I’m not crying over spilled milk here — but it’s really important to remember if you’re hiring designers, you’re hiring good people with experience who can navigate complexity and turn it into direction.

In the modern market of Service Design, it’s pretty easy to pick up a book, learn some methods and dazzle you with the latest buzzwords and methods.

In reality, design means sitting together in a room and working out a route forward by asking the right questions. Those questions come with experience and skills from a design team, not a book.

In commissioning, focus on what they’ve done before, where they’ve done it, what their clients thought, what it helped them to achieve and how they did it. Find out about their process, but don’t weigh this too heavily.

No project is the same with repeatable ‘methods’. Remember it is the quality and experience of the people you are buying, not a process.

 

10. Don’t expect the answer upfront

We’re exploring together so don’t feel nervous when a design team doesn’t know the answer. The best answer is we’ll find out together but we’re here to guide you.

I’ve been asked a lot for ‘the answer’ or ‘the concept’ in tender documents and the reality is there is no possible way I can tell you. What I can do, is show you where we’re tackled a similar problem but until we get stuck into your organisation and users, I can’t tell you the right route forward.

That is what service design is about, we’re here to take you on a journey to find the right insight and help make a design decision.

This doesn’t mean a design team shouldn’t have ideas. Ask them what questions they would have for you. You want them to be curious and to be ‘thinkers’ who will help uncover the right route forward.

 

11. Respect the time to think and design

Often tender documents focus on exact days we will ‘deliver’ and what the output is at each stage. For example, for a day of ‘Sensemaking’ what is the output?

The output is a team with the knowledge to design the right thing. But we’re pushed to create outputs that symbolise we’ve ‘done’ this.

I’ve been genuinely queried on ‘time’ that we’ve baked into a proposal for the team to actually design. What they’re doing here is sketching, discussing, researching, prototyping and it doesn’t always need an output.

It seems we’ve forgotten in the world of Service Design that people who are experts still need the space to think.

I 100% stand behind joined sense making workshops and co-design but we need to strike a balance. When we’re not with you, we’re still delivering and sometimes the researchers or designers just need time to think.

I know this point may sound ludicrous, but it happens fairly frequently in commissioning design, to not actually consider the budget to create freedom to just, well, design.

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="758"] In roughly 50% of proposals, we’re asked to break down projects by exact days[/caption]

12. Buy time not days

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve spent breaking down a day by day delivery to make a budget work. It’s painstaking, and I’d say 95% of the time changes as soon as we meet the client.

It looks a bit like this;

Phase One Prepare research framework — 0.5 days Recruitment framework — 0.25 days Recruiting — 2 days Data and platform preparation — 0.5 days User research x 12 interviews — 4 days User research interview write up — 1 days

You get the picture. Now do this across a project that requires multiple skillsets, lasts over 12 months and you’re breaking down every day down to 0.25 of days to make a budget work and satisfy the commissioner.

Buy time, weekly blocks of time where people work with you on a problem to solve. It’s better for both organisation procuring and agency.

For example:

Phase One Sprint week one: User researcher ( 5 days) Service Designer (5 days) Project Manager (2 days)

Ask what each block will focus on and what the outcomes and outputs are for overall phases. Use this flexibly as a sprint based model and pause (through negotiation and trusting contracts) with your supplier, there’s nothing worse than buying dead time. Getting down to the above level of minutia is really a painstaking approach to negotiate how someone will work for you. Re-frame that to how someone can work with you.

 

13. Clarify what you mean by ‘on-site’

There’s an increase in asking agencies to work ‘on-site’. I totally get this, and we do it fairly frequently but clarify what you mean by this.

When we see on-site requirements we either a) don’t bid as we don’t think the team can travel daily to the site or b) tip the budget on the travel time and expenses to get there.

What I’ve found, is the reality of ‘working on-site’ daily isn’t actually expected as we’re out researching anyway, and our client likes to come to our studio anyway.

During the tendering process, just be explicit on what this means.

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1964"] After 3 days of writing an application for funding, we’re denied because we named one file wrong[/caption]

14. Usability test your procurement process

If I had a pound for every hour I’ve spent trying to understand how to respond, reading multiple documents and piecing together the ask, then responding into formatted templates that don’t work, I’d be rich.

It’s painstakingly hard sometimes when PDFs have input boxes that don’t work, codes for projects must be followed to the letter to save a file and there are complex questions without direct asks. It’s like a test in itself and that isn’t even about our response and proposal as experts.

Make it simple. Have a clear ask and make it easy to reply. Try giving your proposal to someone, even a few agencies to have a quick read and get feedback before formally putting it out.

Keep the questions and page expectations relevant to the contract cost.

Above all, make sure your submission forms work.

I have been close to tears at stages trying to fill in badly designed tender forms and that is not an exaggeration. Often it’s another 3 to 4 hours work.

I understand that this is often largely based on using outdated legacy technology to pass over briefs but there’s some simple techniques above in the documentation you provide to the questions you ask that could simplify the process greatly.

 

15. Tell us if you’ve done this before, and if it failed last time — why did it fail?

It is rare to find a client who hasn’t tried to do a major piece of strategic change before. It’s even rarer still to find one where that was a roaring success. Knowing what came before — what worked and what didn’t — is a great way to help an agency know what ideas or ways of working need to be avoided when delivering a piece of work.

Do people feel burned by a previous agency? Why was this and what should we do to ensure that doesn’t happen?

This is another helpful political question for an agency to gain an insight into who needs to be won over and how.

 

16. Meet the supplier

Above all, meet the supplier.

An initial phone call with potential suppliers either collaboratively or 1 to 1 is helpful for everyone involved. It may seem time intensive but in the long run will save resource by reducing any confusion of intent from the outset. Additionally, it allows organisations to decide not to respond.

Nothing works better than a follow up meeting to ask the questions you want answers to, and it helps the agency understand the full brief and what you’re looking for.

This can also be done, law permitting, by doing things like holding a supplier engagement call or recording a video of you and your team explaining the work. Overall it can help agencies to propose better teams and approaches.

I’ve written far too many proposals where we’ve been told that we haven’t been successful in the feedback call because what we wrote initially and what the client wanted were completely different.

Words can be a very ambiguous when it comes to mutually understanding a problem space.


I hope some of these are helpful. I don’t want this to sound like I’m crying over spilt milk — losing a tender is a natural part of any business and expected — but we could make it a lot smoother for everyone involved!

If you’d like to add any please tweet me @rufflemuffin and I’ll build them in with a repost.

I’d really like to thank Zoe Stanton at Us Creates for providing some good additions and eyes on this.

[post_title] => How to procure service design [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-procure-service-design [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://www.sinnaps.com/en/project-management-blog/agile-project-management-sprint-methodology [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 15:54:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 15:54:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=18558 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [79] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18504 [post_author] => 91 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 17:23:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 17:23:31 [post_content] => We’ll be working in partnership with Barnado’s to develop a library of best-practice guidance for developing digital mental health products for young people. We’re able to do this because we’ve been allocated some of the funding from the Nominet #RESET online Mental Health funding Programme. This was set up with the aim of helping national charities increase the reach and impact of their mental health services.  At least 1 in 8 young people report struggling with mental health issues, with 99% of them spending at least an hour a day online. NHS services have been struggling to meet the demand, and over half of young people state there is no ‘adequate’ mental health support for them. It’s no surprise then, that there’s a growing interest in how digital can meet the increased demand across the public, private and third sector.

Experimenting and exploring

There’s been an explosion of new apps, digital channels and experimental technologies being used to connect with users on mental health and other challenging topics. At Snook, we’ve been experimenting - exploring what digital can do in this area throughout several project collaborations. In 2015 we worked with the Department for Education, Kent and Portsmouth University to explore new ways in which virtual reality could be used to create safe rooms for young people. It would allow them to work remotely with social workers to discuss traumatic experiences and prepare for leaving care. Across 2013 to date, we’ve worked with Young Scot, Mental Health Foundation and NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. explored how technology and social media has affected young people’s mental health and built a range of prototypes to address this, including our launched information and guidance service, Aye Mind. More recently, we’ve been working with Samaritans and clinical experts in the development of a self-help tool, which will give people resources to cope with suicidal thoughts and make an ongoing support plan so they can stay safe in a crisis.

Sharing learnings

From working with charities like Addaction and Samaritans we know there is a huge amount of knowledge about what works in practice. When it comes to the delivery of digital and holistic multi-channel services,  we’ve learned by doing. We know what works (and what doesn’t!) The question is, how can we share this knowledge to design and deliver better services at scale? We’re seeing some poor products enter the market. They’re making which could be avoided by building on the rich knowledge that the charity or public sector often holds.  To address this, we started working with Public Policy Lab and an open community to develop a prototype of a free, public domain set of patterns for the design and delivery of digital services that address mental health needs. We launched a prototype in 2018. This was very much a first iteration to explore how a best practice library could work.  We needed more funding and, crucially, the support and expertise of a charity with experience of providing services to young people to work with. Partnering with Barnado’s and the #RESET funding is enabling us to develop the library’s full potential. We’ll expand it, creating a dedicated section for young people and of course testing to ensure it really works. The aim is is to make sure young people who need support can access it wherever they are and organisations that deliver it can tell that it’s working.  As well as Barnado’s, the other organisations receiving funding include The Mix, Chasing the Stigma, YoungMinds, stem4, Nightline Association and The Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families. They will deliver a range of activities, including improving signposting online, developing new digital products and digitally transforming their organisation to meet demand.   [post_title] => Sharing knowledge for better mental health services [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sharing-knowledge-to-build-better-mental-health-services [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-05 01:48:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-05 01:48:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=18504 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [80] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18509 [post_author] => 53 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 17:16:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 17:16:53 [post_content] =>
Senior Service Designer Ness Wright talk about the challenge and opportunity of designing services and products that people want to use. I’m a proud Fairphone owner (of the 17,248th to be precise). I personally was excited to support a start-up making modular, repairable smartphones from conflict free-materials. Persuading others to jump ship isn’t easy, the camera can’t compete with the latest Apple device and Wired described it as ‘ethical but ugly’.
When I switched to a green energy provider, it felt great knowing our electricity was coming from renewable source, but we received wildly inaccurate bills for the first year and struggled to navigate our way around complex online payment systems.
Picture of Fairphone
Image of a customer bill
Encouraging people to make sustainable choices is hard, from the phones we buy to the energy suppliers we choose (and everything in between), cost, speed, convenience, ease, simplicity, look and feel often trump sustainability. The opportunity here is for sustainability not to have to compete at all – what if the sustainable thing was also the best thing. Service design and its user-centred approach are key to this. We conduct research to understand the needs of our users. We find out what challenges they face, how the service help them and find out what context are they are using it in? We find opportunities to make the service easier to use, more helpful and more attractive, for all sorts of different users. Services can be designed really badly or really well. A well designed service increases the likelihood of someone using because it is genuinely helpful and enjoyable to use. Good service experience is a compelling incentive and plays a key role in making the sustainable choice the best choice.

How have we done this before?

Fishermen contend with the challenges of selectivity every time they go out to fish. Policy places restrictive bans to prevent overfishing of particular species implementing large fines in efforts to curb the insurmountable waste attributed to the industry. In attempt to fish sustainability and to mitigate the negative financial impact of these restrictions, fishermen have been creating their own hacks to modify their nets to help them catch the right fish. SafetyNet Technologies, a London based SME has developed Pisces, a new technology that retrofits to fishing nets and emits different colours and frequencies of light. Fish respond to light in different ways and by capitalising on their physiology, fishermen can attract or deter certain species based on their needs. All impressively innovative, but how might we ensure this technology lands in the hands of fishermen in a way that we can ensure it’s used?
Image of Snook researcher speaking with a fisherman
Looking at where Pisces should attach to the net so we can offer guidance to future owners of the device
For three months we worked with SnTech to understand the needs and motivations of fishermen to adopt this new technology. We developed an ongoing strategy for development of the product based on the needs of fishermen and articulated an ongoing vision of product development of ‘Pisces, built by fishermen, for fishermen’. Our research helped SnTech to modify the development of Pisces and view the product as a service considering everything from guidance for use to a marketing plan. We helped build the sustainable thing as the best thing ensuring the adaptation to new technology was easy and guided by the needs of users.

What’s next?

Sustainability shouldn’t mean compromise on service. Service and user-centred design can help ensure the sustainable thing is enjoyable, helpful and easy to use. Are you developing a sustainable produce or service? We want to work with you to make sure your service offering is the best out there. Email curious@wearesnook.com with the subject line “Sustainability Snooks” to get the conversation started.
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Building a network around Design for Sustainability
Back in April, Snook was overwhelmed by the energy in the room at DOTI: From Service Design to Sustainable Environmental Action. The sense of urgency and excitement from fellow designers and organisations left us keen to keep up the discussion. We should be using design to address our global climate crisis. In response, we invited everyone back last week to transform our discussions into actionable ideas. Together we mapped out our design processes – from scoping projects and building teams, to managing live products/services and navigating policy implications. We then identified points along the way that required intervention.

Our big questions were:

  • How can we adapt our existing tools and processes to make them more sustainable?
  • Do they need to be replaced with new ways of working altogether?
  • What might these look like, and how can we prototype them?
By forming thematic working groups, we identified a variety of new principles and prototypes to test out in our own practices. To name a few, we recognised the following as barriers and opportunities for further work:
  • Finding ways to ask the hard questions: to ourselves and our clients, and at all stages of our project processes. For example: should we be designing this in the first place? Encouraging clients and organisations to identify their sustainability representatives and environmental policies at the start of projects might support this.
  • Bringing futures thinking into conversations now: to consider the long term impact of our work, potential future users and their needs, and how to avoid unintended outcomes. Building time into our projects to free up thinking and consider possible alternatives with our clients was favoured.
  • Working between scales: to navigate policy constraints that often result in red tape. While designers regularly aim to derive impact by working with influential organisations and policy-makers, community engagement and citizen’s/people’s assemblies can offer more direct routes to projects that avoid restrictions and extractive business models.
Our ambition now is to spark the beginnings of a design network across the UK that is dedicated to sustainable impact through design. We’re calling upon individuals with design and sustainability experience to connect, share their knowledge, and plan new projects around design for sustainability. In particular, we want to develop new processes, tools, and principles to prototype and embed within our design practices at scale. Register your interest in joining us here and we’ll send information about our online platforms and upcoming events.
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Captivated by the city, she decided to stay. Whilst not at Snook you can find her chasing the sun or exploring the great outdoors. [post_title] => Tracy Gordon [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tracy-gordon [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-03 12:51:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-03 12:51:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18483 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [83] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18481 [post_author] => 91 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 12:49:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 12:49:41 [post_content] => This has ranged from managing the Business Gateway to programming award-winning international arts festivals. Before joining Snook, Simon led the development of Glasgow’s large scale business innovation centre as part of the £1.3bn City Deal programme. While at Snook he thinks a lot about the role design can play to create value across different business sectors and communities. While not at Snook he thinks about going running a lot and is only moderately cranky before coffee. 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Ultimately, landing herself back in Glasgow at Snook, ready to embrace and learn about the Service Design Industry. When she’s not working or bingeing a TV series, Robyn enjoys sudoku or can be found taking her boxer dog for a walk along the beach. Biscuits are by far her biggest weakness and one day she hopes to be a pro at making sushi. [post_title] => Robyn Greenland [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => robyn-greenland [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-03 12:47:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-03 12:47:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18479 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [85] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18466 [post_author] => 91 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 12:28:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 12:28:57 [post_content] => She has a diverse background in user research, co-creation, service, and is experienced in designing for agencies, startups, and local government. Rachel is happiest when she is making a positive impact on people’s lives. Outside of Snook, Rachel will probably be found practising yoga. She teaches classes with a specialist focus on mental health and resilience. [post_title] => Rachel Hardy [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => rachel-hardy [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-03 12:28:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-03 12:28:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18466 [menu_order] => 10 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [86] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18460 [post_author] => 91 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 12:23:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 12:23:10 [post_content] => Nicola is passionate about designing experiences that have a positive impact on the world and people’s lives. Outside of Snook, you’ll find Nicola visiting her family, cooking and eating new recipes, creating invitations and cards for friends or perhaps painting an abstract landscape (when she finds the time)! [post_title] => Nicola Graham-Marti [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => nicola-graham-marti [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-03 12:23:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-03 12:23:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18460 [menu_order] => 11 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [87] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18456 [post_author] => 91 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 12:18:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 12:18:05 [post_content] => She also writes a lot of stuff behind the scenes that helps the business run smoothly. Things like case studies, bios and other content for proposals and all the internal comms necessary to make Snook a harmonious, happy place to work. She has a varied CV, which, as well as comms, includes working as an animator, teaching at art colleges and doing press in the music industry. But she knew she’d found her calling when she discovered service design. The use of creativity and collaboration to try and leave the world in a better state than we found it in chimed with her desire to do meaningful work. When she’s not at Snook you might find her down the front at noisy gigs or making tacos with her husband, Dom and son, Danny. As well as writing, she loves drawing, swimming outdoors and good coffee. [post_title] => Melissa Gates [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => melissa-gates [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-03 12:18:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-03 12:18:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18456 [menu_order] => 13 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [88] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18452 [post_author] => 91 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 12:15:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 12:15:53 [post_content] => Mathew holds an MSc in Computer Science from the University of Nottingham. His thesis focused on a large-scale simulation of dynamic taxi ride-sharing from the perspective of users. Mathew brings a 10-year track record in culture, technology and social innovation projects. Outside of Snook, you’ll probably find Mathew tinkering with code and data, hanging out with his cat or making things with clay. [post_title] => Mathew Trivett [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => mathew-trivett [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-03 12:24:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-03 12:24:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18452 [menu_order] => 14 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [89] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18438 [post_author] => 91 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 11:52:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 11:52:18 [post_content] => She now employs these skills as a service designer, often taking on responsibilities for project management, communications, and organisation. Linn has an Honours degree in Politics and a Master’s degree in Economics, having focused on international relations and development. Linn is passionate about social justice and transforming lives, and is always eager to take on new challenges. Among other things, she’s developed an inclusive recruitment guide with Snook to promote change and diversity in the design industry. Joining us after a traineeship at the Norwegian Embassy in the Netherlands where she developed a keen interest in cycling - she fits right in with Snook. On top of that, Linn loves travelling and enjoys bragging about how many countries she’s visited (it’s 48, in case you were wondering). [post_title] => Linn Sailer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => linn-sailer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-03 11:52:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-03 11:52:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18438 [menu_order] => 23 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [90] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18435 [post_author] => 91 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 11:49:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 11:49:48 [post_content] => He has built a broad set of skills by working on projects as diverse as corporate culture change programmes to community food campaigns. Alongside his commercial and voluntary work, Liam has also taught design throughout his career. Outside of Snook, you’ll find him running in races that are too long, too muddy, and have too many hills. [post_title] => Liam Hinshelwood [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => liam-hinshelwood [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-01 11:33:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-01 11:33:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18435 [menu_order] => 24 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [91] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18432 [post_author] => 91 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 11:48:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 11:48:01 [post_content] => Keira works on helping to embed service design practices within organisations and, most importantly, to support people develop the skills to design actionable solutions that address their own needs to create successful outcomes. She does this almost always with a squeaky chicken in her hand! The Scottish Government, Includem and the NHS are just some of the clients she’s worked with. Outside of Snook, Keira is part of Analogue Social (AnSo); a group organising monthly meet-ups for the design community in Glasgow. Their events aim to expose the design process and challenge the status-quo of ‘design events’. [post_title] => Keira Anderson [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => keira-anderson [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-12 10:02:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-12 10:02:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18432 [menu_order] => 25 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [92] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18427 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 11:36:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 11:36:19 [post_content] => She also boasts a background in Engineering and Digital Experience Design at Hyper Island. Jasmina has joined Snook as a Design Intern and aims to tackle complex challenges with optimism whilst helping to create simple solutions that meet users needs. When in work, Jasmina often shows her Swedish roots as she requires regular Fika (coffee breaks) and will accept chocolate at any given moment. As an avid traveller, she loves to explore different countries, cultures and learn multiple languages. She is constantly curious about exploring people’s actions and feelings, so you’ll likely find her people-watching in the city or bingeing on the First Dates TV series. [post_title] => Jasmina Aleksic [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => jasmina-aleksic [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-03 11:36:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-03 11:36:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18427 [menu_order] => 27 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [93] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18417 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 11:17:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 11:17:02 [post_content] => As a self-proclaimed jack-of-all-trades, she has worked as a photographer, art facilitator, production manager, stylist, event producer and even managed her own catering business. Her varied work history has given her a broad spectrum of valuable skills and understanding of the creative industries. Outside of Snook, you’ll find Emily in her studio (creating huge abstract paintings), in the forest (photographing funghi with her macro lens), in a dusty venue (performing experimental music) or in front of a sunset (writing whimsical poetry). [post_title] => Emily Mary Barnett [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => emily-mary-barnett [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-01 11:34:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-01 11:34:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18417 [menu_order] => 32 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [94] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18389 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2019-12-02 23:45:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-02 23:45:58 [post_content] => Prior to working at Snook, she has led a range of projects, from building financial resilience for single parents, to helping people to find work they love. Chandni is passionate about using her diverse range of skills across innovation, service design, product design, UX / UI to create a positive impact for people. Outside of work you can find Chandni taking long walks in nature, reading behaviour change books to learn about human psychology, watching documentaries about the universe and trying new things like the flying trapeze. [post_title] => Chandni Patel [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => chandni-patel [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-03 11:06:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-03 11:06:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=18389 [menu_order] => 36 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [95] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18577 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2019-11-19 22:04:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-19 22:04:29 [post_content] =>
Not to brag but we’ve been hacking for some years now. Here we’ve updated and expanded on our 2015 blog post to let you know why we still love hacks (and why you should too).

Hacks defined:

A hack is a time-restricted, issue-exploring, and idea-generating event, where participants come together to create a series of potential solutions to a problem and quickly test them in the real world. The ideas themselves might be realistic or impossible, obvious or completely wild. In any case, the strength of a hack lies in the insight you can gain into why a problem occurs and in the transformation from thinking about what the solution must be to understanding the many solutions there could be. Hacks are never the end of a journey, but they are often the first step on the road to real change led by a group of enthused team members who can own the process and transform an organisation. Also, there is coffee and, quite often, cake.

20 reasons to hack – and love it

1. Tackle a wicked problem “That’s just something we can’t change”, “this same thing comes up again and again”, “we’re in a vicious circle”. Hacks are a great place to address your ‘wicked problems’; things which seem too big, too complicated, or too impossible to solve. You might not uncover the perfect solution right away, but it’s a chance to bring all actors, stakeholders, and knowledge together to move things forward and start addressing these ‘impossible’ issues. 2. Research against the clock Time is precious, especially when it’s comes to a hack. You can’t research the whole world, but if you use your time wisely you could find a golden solution. Hacks are a great way to help you recognise your limitations, prioritise, and know when to stop. 3. Test your skills in the real world It’s always healthy to get away from your desk and experience the world outside the office. Go on, step outside, see the problem in the real world and get to work on it. 4. Work with people with different expertise The best hacks bring together experts with different backgrounds from across society. Remember, we’re all experts in something and all have knowledge to contribute in a hack. Work alongside and learn from people working at every level of an organisation, with end-users, with people who work with your end-users, and with partner organisations. Have your mind and your network expanded. 5. Learn to use open data Data and datasets can be scary words if you don’t deal with them every day, and even scarier when you are trying to consider how to make use of this data in a meaningful way. Use a hack as a chance to rummage around in the depths of your organisation’s data and discover what it can teach you about your users or how it can help to make an experience better for them.
hack main image
6. Experiment with service design It’s a brave new world out there, and service design is part of the ever-growing landscape. Believe it or not, ‘doing design’ is very simple. It’s really just problem-solving in a way that puts the needs of the people involved first. At a hack you can have a go at using the tools that help designers solve problems. Paper templates, programmes, and methods will help you to understand and communicate a problem quickly and work through it with confidence. Tools aren’t mandatory and they certainly aren’t homework; but they can be a great way to kick off your thinking and create solutions to everyday issues. 7. Develop your business skills It’s one thing to have a good idea that fills a need but it’s another to turn it into a viable business. Polish up your skills in a friendly, fast-paced environment by iterating your ideas, developing your pitching skills, and meeting possible future collaborators or customers. 8. Brainstorm like never before There’s nothing like a good brainstorm to generate creative, radical solutions. It’s all about quantity over quality in a hack. You only have a few hours or days so don’t fret about landing on the perfect idea straight away. Have lots of ideas, have them often, and test them straight away. 9. Meet your future employers or employees Looking for your next big break or employment opportunity? Hacks can be a great space to seek out opportunities and identify exciting individuals for your next business adventure. They’re also a great place to meet other talented individuals and be inspired by how they work. Maybe they’ll be the next addition to your organisation? 10. Prototype at the speed of light Make it fast and make it now. Rather than having endless discussions on what exactly the right thing might be and what it might look like, hacks are the place to make it first and ask questions later. It will all get a little bit Blue Peter, but by building things, by bringing them to life, we can quickly understand how they might exist and work in the wild (…or how they won’t!). You’ll be amazed how quickly you can pull together a rough draft and how much you can learn from even your earliest prototypes.
11. Test ideas with real people When we try to solve problems, it can be very easy to make assumptions about what other people will respond to. The key is testing our assumptions and then adjusting them according to our findings. Until you’ve tested your prototype with ‘real people’, it’s just a model. It’s natural to want to ask people ‘what they think’ of your idea, but at a hack you’ll be persuaded to actually let them experience it, to observe how they interact with it, and to iterate based on what you learn. 12. Learn to pitch ideas Hacks are the perfect place to pick up and practise those all-important pitching skills. Practice makes perfect, and believe us, you’ll be pitching endless amounts of ideas throughout a hack; to your team, to ‘real people’, and to all the hackers. 13. Get inspired! Meeting new people, thinking on your feet, and discovering new ideas and solutions in a fast-paced environment is a great way to get the inspiration flowing. 14. Experiment with new technologies Whether you are computer shy or tech mad, hacks are the perfect setting to get to grips with new technologies and see where they could take you. Remember, you’re working against the clock; it will be messy, you will break things, but then you might just put them back together again. 15. Make friends Meet people who think and operate similarly or differently to you, learn from each other and you might just end up building friendships that last longer than the end of the day.
16. Develop leadership skills In such a team-based working style, which increasingly mirrors our working lives, you’ll all need to play leader at some point. A hack is a great place to experience and try out different leadership styles, and see how people respond to them. Which styles work for you? For your team? Is it better to lead from the front, behind, or in the midst? A hack lets you figure it out, creating a sturdy basis for the next time you’re in charge. 17. Give public speaking a go (if you want!) Hacks are spaces where failing is encouraged and celebrated. You’re all working towards the same goal, so your audience is always behind you. If you’re a nervous public speaker, it’s a great place to swallow that fear with the support of your teammates, fellow hackers, and facilitators, as well as learn from others. 18. Turn great ideas into start-ups Most hacks operate under the ‘creative commons’ concept; the ideas generated there exist in the public realm, available to all. However, don’t worry about ‘keeping your idea to yourself’. An idea is nothing without an audience and a movement around it, and particularly without an enthusiastic and varied team. Use hacks to explore your ideas with others and bring them to life. 19. Brush up on your team skills There’s no I in team, and there isn’t in hack either… The great thing about a hack is that in such a short timeframe you’ll quickly find yourselves divvying up the tasks, finding new ways to bring everyone’s ideas together. By the end of the event you’ll have no clue which idea was whose and you’ll be one slick, problem-busting team-machine. 20. Most importantly, have fun What better way to figure out problems than having fun while doing it? There will be rubber chickens, there will be moments of spontaneous hilarity, there will be the silliest of ideas. Creativity comes best to us when we are enjoying ourselves. We’re curious creatures and exploring problems and ideas with others really sparks our imagination. Even when things get tough, your facilitators will be there to help you step away from yourselves for a while and to reset your mood. You’ll laugh long and hard at a hack, even if you don’t think you find rubber chickens particularly funny.

“The experience of Snook guiding without intrusion and providing the right environment where all comments and ideas are potentially valid is one that could be mistaken for chaos, but is probably closer to genius.”

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In order to design effectively, we aim to understand what people truly need and how those needs fit into their lives.
Research interviews and workshops can lead to deep conversations and may tackle sensitive subjects head on. Some of these discussions will resonate with us more than others. When something touches us we may find that our mind wanders, we might even get flashbacks, feel stressed or find ourselves struggling to ‘shake off’ what we have heard. We might experience emotions that are slightly out of synch with what’s happening, be more angry or sad than the situation warrants. When that happens, we’re not available to those around us – colleagues or participants – or to ourselves. We need to be able to look after ourselves first so that we can support others. This doesn’t always come naturally so we need to prepare ourselves for these difficult moments. We need techniques to ‘ground ourselves’, to stay in the present – before we can respond. It doesn’t take long, often just a few minutes to breathe. This article is gathered from our own experiences. It does not constitute professional advice. If you are worried about your mental health or that of someone else, please contact your GP or some of the organisations mentioned at the end of the article. Some of the techniques below may feel very foreign at first, but they work. I would encourage you to practice them with an open mind and discover the techniques that work best for you.

5 techniques for self-care:

1. Breathe. Breathing is the cornerstone of self-care. Gradually extend your exhalation so that it becomes longer, then inhale. You can imagine that you are breathing slowly in and out through a straw. Some people like to exhale through the mouth, like a sigh. Just be aware of the the air coming in and out, either by placing your hand on your abdomen or by paying attention to wherever you can track the sensations of breathing. Find your own way to do as much of this as you feel comfortable doing – there’s no need to make yourself feel self-conscious. A few moments of awareness can make all the difference. Extending your exhalation sends a calming down message to your nervous system and can make a huge difference. Don’t worry about the in breath, it will take care of itself. 2. Feel your feet on the ground. If you’re sitting down, feel the chair under your bottom, the back of the seat supporting your back. Keep breathing out slowly. 3. Pay attention to your environment. If you’re on the train heading home, can you feel the wobble of the train? What can you hear around you? What else can you notice around you? Can you feel wind on your face? Keep breathing out slowly. 4. Shake it off. Animals who have escaped a danger tremble to release the adrenaline. Shake your hands, your arms, your legs, your head, as if you were trying to flick something off. Return to breathing out slowly. 5. Brush it off. Brush your shoulders as if you were brushing some dust of your shoulder pads. You’re letting the stories fall off your shoulders. Think of the expression: “you’ve got too much on your shoulders,” or, “to have a monkey on your back.” Well, flick them away. You can do the same thing on your back.

Open up to the experience

It’s hard, sometimes very hard. It’s tempting to escape that feeling instead of opening up to it. All feelings are legitimate and less frightening when we name and include them. If you feel yourself becoming reactive to what’s happening, see if you can open up to being curious, maybe by saying to yourself: “Well, that’s interesting.” That little sentence seems to create just enough distance to allow you to breathe and maybe remember the other four techniques for self-care. Practicing these techniques will hopefully help you stay grounded when difficult moments arise. What techniques do you use? Share them with us #snookthinking Read the rest of the research series post: 10 things to consider when planning a project on a sensitive subjecthow we look after ourselves after the research and how we care for research participants. There are also services and organisations that you can talk to. In the UK and Ireland: Samaritans offer emotional support 24 h/day – free phone 116 123 Breathing Space: 0800 83 85 87, 24h at weekends (6pm Fri – 6am Mon) and 6pm to 2am on weekdays (Mon – Thur) With thanks to Clare Crombie
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Anne Dhir talks about why data-and-design are brilliant bedfellows. I came to service design from a business background. Ever since I joined Snook 5 years ago, I have been keen to look at how service designers and data practitioners can work together to achieve greater impact.

It’s a two-way street

Service designers don’t need to become data analysts, and technologists don’t need to become service designers. However, we need to know each other well enough so that we can benefit from one another’s strengths.

We share a vision

When I talk to designers and data practitioners, in particular around open data, it strikes me that we often share a vision. The transparency and transformation agenda have a lot in common. We believe in evidence-based decision making, even if the evidence we specialise in – qualitative or quantitative – varies. We believe in open-ended innovation; that well-designed solutions benefit not only the immediate users, but have a positive impact on the wider ecosystem. We believe in continuous improvement.

We need to be aware of each other

As a project manager of a data project, do you ask your client: “Do you have a service design team we can involve?”. As a service design team, do you routinely invite a data team to your project kick-off? Or include them in your stakeholder mapping? To do: try to find these teams or people. It might not be a formal team; it may simply be someone with an interest. You might actually find allies who help you deliver better outcomes.

We need to better understand each other

We need to understand how our disciplines fit together, and what we can each bring to a project. Service designers want to design services as end-to-end experiences that help users achieve their goals, are practical for staff, and are sustainable so that organisations can continue to deliver them. Data experts help organisations manage their data efficiently, so that data can be an asset that enables evidence-based policies and decisions. To do: Interview data technologists to better understand them, in the same way that we interview users and stakeholders to design a service.

What data can we work on together?

When we talk about design and data, designers automatically think of quantitative data to support qualitative insights. However, what we’re talking about here is different. Firstly, it is about the data that the service needs to function. For example, a service that enables Council to collect council tax from residents needs data about the properties, such as size and location. It requires data about who lives in the property, their age and status. As designers, we need to pay more attention to the ‘inside’ of the form: the data that users enter into the forms that we create. Secondly, it’s the data that the service creates that might be used for the purpose of the service or for other purposes. For example, when businesses pay their tax to the Council, it creates a dataset not only about the businesses and their taxes, but also about the state of the local economy.

We need all the data

To design efficient and effective services, we need to consider the whole data spectrum, not just open data. Open data is the tip of the iceberg – the part that is visible to users outside the organisation – but policy making and continuous improvement require the full spectrum, including shared and closed data. If a Council is designing interventions to increase the resilience of the local economy, it needs to know about all businesses; including sole traders, unincorporated associations, and partnerships. Otherwise, it runs the risk of reaching erroneous conclusions. Service designers also need to include in their designs how the service might publish open data safely and efficiently to deliver benefits to wider ecosystem beyond the service users and providers. To do: Stay tuned! As part of a project funded by ODI, Snook created a toolkit to share service design tools with data practitioners interested in data-led service design. During the Service Design Network global conference, I facilitated a workshop with Sarah to build up the data skills of service designers. This is still a work in progress and if you’re interested, do get in touch.
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Play. It’s one of the core characteristics of Snook’s culture, and one we try to encourage when working, both internally and with our clients. At Snook we tackle serious issues with a sunny disposition. We believe that this attitude leads to innovative and creative solutions.
Here’s our thinking on why play, work, and creativity go hand in hand.

More laughter = more productivity

Work is not often associated with fun, or a place of laughter – but it should be. According to Robert Provine, a professor of psychology at the University of Maryland: “Laughter is the quintessential human social signal. Laughter is about relationships.” But why is this, and why is it important at work? Simply put, laughter creates better communication, fosters empathy and increases cooperation between colleagues. It’s a fundamental human communication tool that can create stronger connections between workers. At Snook we are huge fans of funny GIFs. We regularly invest time creating custom emojis for each other and are proud of our honorary ‘bants of the month award’. We take stock and laugh out loud at (and with) the colleague who brings the most banter each month. We see laughter as a valuable part of company culture and time.
 

Older and wiser?

As we get older, we can often become more reserved when it comes to playfulness. Why is this? Is it because we can’t be “bothered” with the frivolity of play? Or maybe we just don’t have the time. But we should make the time. As Bernard Shaw puts it, “we don’t stop playing because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing.” When workshopping with clients we like to bring along our handy box of tricks. This includes building blocks, craft supplies, and play-doh. At first there can be some resistance to this as professionals wonder why their corporate boardroom is becoming filled with toys. However, as this resistance fades, it turns to playful interaction, prototyping, and collaboration. Workshopping with toys, making with unusual materials, and stepping away from computer screens allows participants to think outside of the box. This act of play can alleviate stress, creating a non-competitive and productive atmosphere – the perfect storm for generating new ideas and initiating creative conversations.

Answers come to those who play

Laughter and playfulness are creative fuel for your brain. Being able to experiment at work frees us from stress and anxiety, two things that are fundamental drains of creativity. Think about the last time you faced an issue at work? How did you tackle it? How did you relieve stress and anxiety, and what tips would you share? Imagine what would happen if you laughed about it! What if you were given time to play with the possibilities of the outcome? This thought process creates an atmosphere that is free from a fear of being criticised or judged. When given the space to think of creative and innovative solutions you can get excited with the possibilities of play.
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How design patterns can help deliver better journeys across providers.
We sit in a no-man’s-land. The contested space for bikes, buggies, wheelchairs, bags and the occasional pet. A man who has just been wheeled on board asks if I can pass his bags. The attendant has left them out of reach and he needs to work. He is smartly dressed and makes this commute twice a week. He travels to the city for work on Mondays and returns home on Thursday for the weekend. The attendants often leave his bags out of reach. Sometimes they put them on his lap as they push him through the station. This hurts his legs. He jokes that today he is glad to be on board. Sometimes he is left in the waiting room, watching his train departure time come and go without anyone coming to help him on board. He is forgotten. Occasionally, Passenger Assist forget to take him off the train. He remains on board, travelling up and down the line until someone helps him. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1892"] Illustration by Julia Scheele[/caption] Over years of conducting user research on buses, trains and planes, we’ve heard far too many stories like this. The Deaf student who ended up stuck on a train back at the depot after the service terminated early. He missed the audio announcement, and no one thought to check if there were people still on the train. The woman with the broken pelvis waiting for nearly an hour for someone to come and help her carry her bags between the train and taxi. The autistic child who was distraught at having to change trains three times in one journey and not being able to sit in the same seat. Too often we find out that people with a range of mental health issues consider navigating public transport too stressful. Negative experiences like these often lead to people giving up on public transport, feeling safer and happier in private vehicles. This though further segregates them from society. Once people have invested in a car, they are unlikely to switch back. There is some great work being done by the likes of NeatboxWest Midlands Railway and others to overcome many barriers to travel for people with a range of physical and mental health needs. These stories and many more have several common features:

1. Problems that could be designed-out in advance

Most of the issues could have been planned or designed-out in advance, by involving users in the design process and testing prototypes with a range of people before implementation. From physical challenges like the poles on trains that prevent wheelchair passengers from passing, or digital signs with road names being placed behind the wheelchair seat on some buses. To more complex challenges like the autistic child wanting to sit in the same seat number for a rail journey.

2. Friction at boundaries

The majority of challenges also occur in the changes between transport modes and providers. Where transport providers have a support service, this often does not cover the end-to-end passenger journey, only the part provided by that organisation. Providers need to help their customers reach their destination. This highlights a key opportunity for Mobility as a Service (MaaS) concepts to better connect multiple modes and create an easier journey for passengers with accessibility needs.
[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1892"] Illustration by Julia Scheele[/caption]

3. Human error and misunderstanding

Things go wrong with human interactions, often unintentionally and due to a lack of awareness. The heavy bags that were placed on the wheelchair user’s lap, the driver who announced the train termination over audio without realising there may be a Deaf passenger on board. All of the stories are everyday journeys that people should be able to make easily and without unnecessary stress. This suggests that staff roles need redesigning to provide a great experience. Ensuring all customer-facing staff have the right training, such as specific disability awareness and mental health first aid. Enough time to help people and treat them as individuals, emphasis on empathy as a job requirement, permission to be flexible when necessary. Research is also needed into the organisational processes and rules that are causing the current challenges.
[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1892"] Illustration by Julia Scheele[/caption]
 
We need to design services that meet the needs of people with both physical and mental health requirements. And this needs to be across all transport services, not just special apps that work in certain areas or for one provider.

Design patterns for accessible and inclusive transport

Service design patterns offer a great opportunity to create more accessible transport services. Design patterns stem from architectural practice, such as making sure steps on stairs are equally spaced for ease of walking. They have since been applied in the service design world by GDSProjects by If and here at Snook to ensure consistent experiences for users across multiple services. Defining accessible design patterns for transport services would enable all providers to adapt their services to meet a range of needs, without each provider having to conduct specific research or design individual apps. Good service experiences go far beyond apps and design patterns could be used for better experiences at stations, planning travel, face-to-face with staff and over the phone. Furthermore, a set of standards would help hold providers to account when things go wrong or fall beneath an acceptable level. At Snook, we want to develop service design patterns for accessible transport as part of our mission to help deliver better, more human-centred travel. We are looking for partners and are exploring funding options, so if you are interested in working together get in touch! Email curious@wearesnook.com with the subject line Design Patterns for Accessible Travel.
[post_title] => Design patterns for accessible transport [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => service-design-patterns-for-accessible-transport [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://wearesnook.com/mobility-as-a-service/ [post_modified] => 2019-12-03 22:51:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-03 22:51:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=18553 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 100 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19191 [post_author] => 93 [post_date] => 2020-03-06 11:19:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-06 11:19:42 [post_content] => Snook is excited to announce that we are the Home Office's user centred design partner. The team will be working with Katy Arnold, Deputy Director for Design and Research at the Home Office and her excellent research and design teams. We’ve long been fans of the HO Digital Blog. We’ll be supporting them with capabilities in design and working on a range of their portfolio projects. This is a significant partnership for Snook with the Home Office, over two years, working on the inside of Government to design and deliver critical services that are used by the whole population. 11 years ago, Snook first walked through the doors of the Home Office with a new product we were developing - MyPolice, the UK’s first online feedback tool which we successfully launched in Scotland. Since then we’ve worked on projects helping housing organisations consider the journey of asylum seekers, worked with senior policy makers on security and worked with operatives in control rooms to design the software and services that manages 999 calls. It's a big landmark for us and we can't wait to get started.   [post_title] => Home Office + Snook [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => home-office-and-snook [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-09 09:25:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-09 09:25:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19191 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 296 [max_num_pages] => 3 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => 1 [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 6c03c079af6fd486962cf83195718c32 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => about [1] => an [2] => are [3] => as [4] => at [5] => be [6] => by [7] => com [8] => for [9] => from [10] => how [11] => in [12] => is [13] => it [14] => of [15] => on [16] => or [17] => that [18] => the [19] => this [20] => to [21] => was [22] => what [23] => when [24] => where [25] => who [26] => will [27] => with [28] => www ) [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

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