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Unsurprisingly 27 of our team had completed undergraduate degrees in design and you can see the different courses they took outlined below. Seventeen of our Service Design staff also have Masters degrees and 12 of these are specifically in design-related subjects. We have always been fortunate in our ability to recruit staff from across the world, giving us a strong international perspective, and we currently have staff from Australia and New Zealand, Taiwan, all across Europe (from Sweden to Portugal), and also Central America. Valerie Carr, our Director of Strategy shares her personal story of her introduction to service design by reflecting on who she learned from and what she learned. I’m the single Interior Design Graduate in the chart above and, after graduation, worked in Interior Design until I had my first son in 1989. I then completed a Masters in Computer Aided Design and worked for a while doing computer generated graphics for architects before moving into lecturing part-time.  I continued lecturing right through the birth of three more sons,  then decided to embark upon a PhD when the youngest was four.  We obtained funding from NHS Estates  to conduct a joint Project involving the School of Design and School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Dundee.  The project aimed to evaluate the impact of the built environment on birth mothers, their partners and staff in maternity units. I had the great privilege of being supervised by Tom Inns, a pioneer in Design for Innovation, and learning research methods from the team at the Social Dimensions of Health Institute.  I also learned a lot about evidence-based design and the importance of rigour in user research from the team at Center for Healthcare Design. Anyone interested in the outputs from the project can find my thesis here - but I warn you, it’s very long! It was while evaluating the impact of the built environment that I became interested in how we might design organisations and services to better meet the needs of those who access them. It  became clear that some elements of the interior environment which have been designed for specific  benefit did not achieve the desired impact because of organisational constraints related to how services were delivered.  After taking a midlife gap year in Burundi, Central East Africa, in 2009 we relocated to Lancaster where I worked as Research Associate on an 18 month research project “Design in Practice”.  This project built on the foundations of the Design Council Red Programme, the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement experience-based design approach, and the work of Ezio Manzini and team at Politecnico di Milano. It also gave me the opportunity to work with and learn from an amazing team at Imagination Lancaster.  Prof Rachel Cooper has been instrumental in defining the role of designers in the 20th/21st century (check the link to see another familiar name in Scottish Service Design circles). Daniela Sangiorgi was one of the first academics really exploring Service Design as a discipline in its own right, tracing the origins from other disciplines. The other members of our project team, Sabine Junginger and Monika Buscher brought valuable insights from Design Management and Sociology. Our reflections on the development of Service Design can be found in the papers we wrote.  In 2012, I joined Snook, who were the first (and only at that time) Service Design company in Scotland. Over the past 8 years I’ve had the privilege of working on a wide variety of projects across the UK and beyond. We've seen our team grow from 5 to over 50, and the breadth, depth and impact of our projects increase. We’ve seen User-Centred Design and Service Design become mainstream with the establishment of Government Digital Services and the Scottish approach to service design. Meeting user-centred design criteria has become mandatory for government services in both Scotland and the wider UK. I think back to the absolute bewilderment and frustration expressed by one of the GPs involved in our Design in Practice project in 2009, “I just don’t understand what design has to do with clinical practice!’ and hope more people across the public, third and private sector value the contribution design can bring to making services work better for everyone. 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About Snook

Snook is a design studio built to make the world more human. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this with our design team, engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. In the past five years we’ve more than doubled in size to a team approaching 60 people, opened a new London studio, and worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK to Hackney City Council, Tesco to the Scottish Government. Learn more about Snook’s exciting journey here. We have big plans for the next three years and are seeking people who can join us, working with our partners and clients to design services that support people to thrive. Below, you’ll find information on our requirements, the job responsibilities, our values, what we’re looking for, what we offer, and how to apply.

About the role

Our lead design training role focuses on building literacy in user centred design with our clients at Snook and our partner company Northgate Public Services. We have been training our clients for over ten years in design from the basics in prototyping to how to monitor services when they are live. We want to grow this capability into something special and are on the hunt for someone who can take existing practice into a launchable enterprise. A major part of the role is delivering a programme of work across Northgate Public Services to deliver user-centred design training across the organisation and build capability. Additionally, building a community of user-centred design and practice across NPS. This is an ideal role for someone with experience in service design and delivery who wants to focus on training and build a new offer.

Responsibilities

You will be expected to have the following responsibilities:

Our Requirements

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience: Desired skills: Most importantly, you’re looking to join a lovely team and support us in delivering great design work. Definite bonus points include an appreciation for gifs and bad puns.

What we offer

You will be on a Northgate Public Services contract, working in the Snook studio. Alongside a competitive salary, we can offer a contract with the following benefits:

How to apply

We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages. Please submit PDFs of a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a short supporting example of your work in the format of an A4 document highlighting key projects. Send this to 'apply-3f1e865e445701@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title 'Hire me: User-Centred Design Trainer' . If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. In the covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you would be a good candidate for the position, and why you want to work at Snook. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or have to travel after work we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours. Please note, candidates must be able to demonstrate a pre-existing right to work and travel within the EU. Documentary evidence will be required. All offers are subject to satisfactory vetting and reference checks. All roles as standard undertake a Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) check, some roles may require additional vetting such as NPPV/MOD. Northgate Public Services is an equal opportunities employer, welcoming applications from all communities.   [post_title] => User-Centred Design Trainer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => user-centred-design-trainer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-01 11:36:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-01 11:36:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19489 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19371 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-04-07 10:21:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-04-07 10:21:25 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

We are looking to recruit a Head of Service Design to provide strong leadership and coaching to our growing design and delivery teams. The role will be key to ensuring the team do their best work, maintaining consistency of high quality delivery across our projects and pushing us to meet our mission by designing services that have real impact on people’s lives. You will champion user-centred design and research within Snook, with our clients and partners, and across the wider design industry.  You will work closely with our Head of Design to grow and develop our service design practice across Snook’s studios and our partners.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit PDFs of a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to 'apply-b6c875b4e11701@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: Head of Service Design”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.  [post_title] => **CLOSED** Head of Service Design [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => head-of-service-design [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-26 08:57:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-26 08:57:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19371 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19308 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 14:45:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 14:45:09 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As a Senior Interaction Designer at Snook, you will be responsible for taking a lead role in projects with a focus on creating intuitive, inclusive and accessible design solutions.  Your work will include designing holistic services that work for a wide range of people, and the design of digital products and supporting the digital design team and wider disciplines to embrace the importance of accessible interaction design.  Your work will require collaboration across our user centered disciplines and go beyond the screen.  You will design in the open, leading the communication of design decisions within the project team and clients, championing the importance of design and user needs.  You’ll relish working closely with our clients and partners, supporting our approach to new business opportunities, and in co-designing services and products with users.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to 'apply-d589d8545fed01@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: Senior Interaction Designer”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours. [post_title] => Senior Interaction Designer/UX [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => senior-interaction-designer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-02 14:52:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-02 14:52:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19308 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19265 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-03-18 14:42:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-18 14:42:10 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As an Interaction Designer at Snook, you will be responsible for participating in projects with a focus on creating intuitive, inclusive and accessible design solutions.  Your work will include designing holistic services that work for a wide range of people, and the design of digital products and supporting the digital design team and wider disciplines to embrace the importance of accessible interaction design.  Your work will require collaboration across our user centered disciplines and go beyond the screen.  You will design in the open, communicating the design decisions within the project team and clients, championing the importance of design and user needs.  You’ll relish working closely with our clients and partners in co-designing services and products with users.

Requirements 

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants, not just those who have worked in the design or creative industries. You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter, your notice period and a portfolio of your work highlighting key projects. If you do not have a portfolio, we have created a simple template that you can use. Send your CV, cover letter and portfolio as pdfs to 'apply-4456795eac5e01@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: Interaction Designer”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours. [post_title] => Interaction Designer/UX [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => interaction-designer-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-02 14:52:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-02 14:52:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19265 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19153 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2020-03-05 15:37:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-03-05 15:37:50 [post_content] => Here at Snook we love books. So much so that we didn't manage to keep it to a top 5 as originally planned. So, for World Book Day here are 13 books about design and the world that we love: 1. Hope In The Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities — Rebecca Solnit 2. The Craftsman — Richard Sennett 3. Design as Politics — Tony Fry 4. Good Services — Lou Downe 5. The Death & Life of the Great American Cities — Jane Jacobs 6. Braiding Sweetgrass — Robin Wall Kimmerer 7. Exhalation — Ted Chiang 8. Doughnut Economics — Kate Raworth 9. From What is to What If — Rob Hopkins 10. Radical Help — Hilary Cottam 11. Wabi-Sabi for Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers — Leonard Koren 12. Thinking in Systems — Deborah H. Meadows 13. Dark Matter & Trojan Horses — Dan Hill [post_title] => 13 books about design and the world for World Book Day [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 13-books-about-design-and-the-world-for-world-book-day [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-05 16:23:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-05 16:23:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19153 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18201 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2019-12-04 21:46:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-04 21:46:39 [post_content] => [post_title] => Building Ireland’s first public sector service design centre [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => irelands-first-innovation-centre [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-01-07 16:05:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-01-07 16:05:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://localhost/snook-dev/?post_type=work&p=18201 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => work [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18217 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 22:08:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 22:08:49 [post_content] => [post_title] => Designing adult social care [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => designing-adult-social-care [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 23:02:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 23:02:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://localhost/snook-dev/?post_type=work&p=18217 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => work [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18558 [post_author] => 90 [post_date] => 2019-12-03 21:24:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-03 21:24:37 [post_content] =>
Sarah Drummond talks about learnings and best practice in procuring service design.

I’ve been responding to requests for bids from clients in the form of ITTs, RFQs, Briefs, Proposal requests — for over 10 years, across the public, private and third sector for my company Snook. Even after all this time, I’m still surprised at how some of the small things that our clients do at this stage often make it very hard for them to get good results from the work they commission later on.

Procuring design can be a tricky business if you’ve never done it before, or you’re having to explain what it is and what you need via a procurement department.

It’s even more difficult when you are protected by rules that ensure you don’t discuss the job in hand with potential suppliers .

The market is increasing in size with more people eager to commission Service Design, and even more people trying to sell it.

With an increase in the popularity of Service Design (and ‘design thinking’), I’ve seen a growing trend towards clients asking for service design without necessary knowing what it is or how to integrate it with the other outcomes they want to achieve from a given scope of work. ‘Service Design’ has become a catch all for any kind of change, making it increasingly hard to buy as a service from an agency or supplier.

I want the people I work with to get the best possible results — so I’ve written a 16 (awkward) part guide on how to buy service design.

It’s not exhaustive, but rather a list of some helpful tips that might help you if you’re involved in commissioning or selling service design.

I find that these elements help both sides reach a quicker understanding of what’s needed.

 

1. Be clear about what problem you’re trying to solve

Start with a clear intent, and don’t use ‘Service Design’ as a catch all for all ‘creative’ or ‘innovation’ projects.

Normally it’s good to start with a problem to solve that you have either evidence for but if you don’t know what the problem is, describe the issue you need to explore.

Here are a list of potential starting sentences and project types that I use to describe the different asks that come to us. They help us to define what kind of team we might put on our projects and how we might help answer the ask.

Problem defining and service design: We’re looking to understand why a service we run doesn’t work and how we can improve it

Digital channel shift: We’re looking to exploit digital as a way to scale our service offer

Proposition development: We’re looking to develop a clear product proposition and service to deliver it

Service Design: We need to design a service for the future

Product innovation: We need to think about the wider user experience of a product we deliver

Detail design: We’re looking to design the end-to-end service in detail at a delivery level

Technology driven innovation: We’re looking to understand an opportunity with a new technology we’ve discovered

Capability building: We’re looking to build our capacity to design services and re-align our internal structure to facilitate this

System and problem shaping: We’ve got a big challenge around X and we need to find a way forward to tackle it

User research: We need to better understand if we need to build a service or how we can better meet the needs of a user group.

We need to transform our organisation to centre around our customer needs and set a vision for where we are going.

This isn’t exhaustive but it might help you think about the intent of your project over the process of Service Design.

 

2. Set a budget or investment bracket

People often ask me ‘how much does service design cost’ and the honest answer is — it depends entirely on what you want to achieve.

Not setting a budget leaves an agency in a difficult position to consider how deep you want to go, for what length of time, if you can add on other deliverables that will enhance the final design. It’s like shooting in the dark.

Without a budget we can’t understand your level of investment and are left without understanding if you have the funds for a Ferrari or Fiat Panda. This isn’t about selling you dead time — we make our client’s budgets work to maximise the value they get for the time they can afford.

Budget can mean the difference in numbers of research participants to how long we spend on shipping the design. A budget range from x to x is fine but at least give the responders somewhere to aim for.

Without this, you end up with either unrealistic budgets where agencies try to over promise or proposals that shoot way beyond what you were looking for or able to invest in.

 

3. Focus on outcomes not outputs

Ensure your brief or tender focuses on outcomes not outputs. When you ask for a report at the end, you’re laying the focus on the delivery of the thing, not on the knowledge you need to make the right decision to deliver or design a service.

Try dropping reports out from your deliverables and instead focus on a KPI or outcome along the lines of ‘We need to have a concrete understanding of the existing user experience so we can take the right decisions on what we need to change’

Be flexible for that output to change, just ensure you map what you need to know at each stage of the project and work collaboratively with your partner to identify the right format as the project begins to close.

Treat the project as a learning experience and consider how your organisation can join the journey of knowledge development. I’m not adverse to writing reports, but if the focus is on an agency to write a report to meet your stakeholder needs, the richness and value of the original research and insight can get lost in producing something that is watered down to the ‘right wording’. If this is really needed, create a separate budget line to support you to write the stakeholder report.

You should place the value and emphasis on learning, rather than on the delivery of outputs. Raw deliverables are much better and ultimately more useful than over produced tools or reports.

When the output is the goal, we lose all value and meaning in what the intention of the project was at the end.

[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="1920"] The team from Letchworth Garden City working with Snook on a design project, learning was baked in from the outset of the council’s team[/caption]

4. Make the space for your team to learn

Service Design is a knowledge and insight game. If you’re bringing someone in-house recognise that you will gain the most value from them by working with them.

Ensure there is time made available for your team, in particular a product lead, delivery manager or individual closely related to delivering the thing you’re working on to join that team’s journey.

Look wider too, who would benefit from what this team are doing? Any good agency will support you to think about that at the outset, a RACI framework can help with that but it is good to look ahead and make the resource available on your side.

This doesn’t mean looking over their shoulder, but join in their research, attend their stand ups and make sure there are regular show and tells for you to hear about the work first hand.

5. Give us time, commission early

It’s down to an agency to only pitch for a job if they know that they can deliver it. However, I’d be worried if anyone can say confidently they can start within two weeks. Does this business have no other work on? I’m regularly being asked to tender within a two week window and ‘start’ the week after.

We say we can start because ultimately, there are always delays. Contracts, recruitment, finding first dates for meetings, the list goes on, and usually by the time it is all worked out everyone is ready to go, so it usually works out. But it isn’t the best start, it’s good to get that all out the way so our prime focus is the job in hand and our team have had time out from the project that just finished to decompress and ready themselves for the next job.

This could all be smoother.

Try to look ahead in your commissioning cycle by thinking two to three months before you want to start. This means you’ll get a fresh team ready to work on your project without trying to finish off other projects.

Ultimately, this is an agency’s responsibility to be ready to deliver, but just look ahead and commission early, it could make work better for everyone.

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="566"] At Snook we often map hypothesis across the project at kick off, building ideas and testing prototypes but they can be really helpful at the outset of a tender process from clients[/caption]

6. Tell us your hypothesis upfront

At the start of any project I map the hypothesis of the project team to gain an understanding of what they think we might find out through the research or what the outcomes of the project might be. It helps us to understand any bias, pre-conceived ideas and recognise any agendas at the table.

It would be really helpful if we knew this when writing a proposal upfront. It helps us to understand what we might want to validate or question from the get go and write a proposal around. Again, any good agency should go through this with you at the outset, however, it is helpful to give the agency more understanding of where your head is at and what they will need to do to validate or break your hypothesis.

 

7. If you’re trying to win a battle make it clear

Often once we’re commissioned, we find out that our work is more of a political piece than a straight up service design project. This is ok, I understand that part of design can be a democratic tool to validate a user need or perspective with evidence, but it’s good to know upfront. When our work needs to be more persuasive then it’s good for us to think about who is good at that kind of work.

If you aren’t going to be open with a brief, find a way to help an agency understand the wider context of what’s going on. There needs to be budget for some of that understanding and context setting so we can do our work well by understanding the politics of the situation early on.

Design skills can be different from consultancy skills and if you’re going to need a persuasive critical friend, we need to look at our team carefully and think about who right people are to help both surface that insight but then communicate it. That is often not the same person.

 

8. Beware over delivery promises

We all lose proposals, but nothing stings more than being told someone else promised double what we did for the same budget.

For me, if someone promises you the world for far less than the majority of other bids, this is a red alert.

I’ve been on the commissioning side and been burned early on in my career when someone promised everything.

Ultimately, they couldn’t deliver, and I found they were working all hours to deliver, which meant in turn, the work was sloppy, they were late for meetings and generally didn’t do a great job on any of the project because they had other projects on to bolster their income.

I’d listen to people who push back on the budget, they probably have enough experience to tell you it’s tight. It’s then yours (and theirs) discretion to go forward with the work on the identified budget or bolster it.

 

9. Remember you’re hiring talent not a process or methods

I’ve lost pitches because ‘our methods’ weren’t clear enough and the competitor had ‘more innovative methods’. Now, I’m not crying over spilled milk here — but it’s really important to remember if you’re hiring designers, you’re hiring good people with experience who can navigate complexity and turn it into direction.

In the modern market of Service Design, it’s pretty easy to pick up a book, learn some methods and dazzle you with the latest buzzwords and methods.

In reality, design means sitting together in a room and working out a route forward by asking the right questions. Those questions come with experience and skills from a design team, not a book.

In commissioning, focus on what they’ve done before, where they’ve done it, what their clients thought, what it helped them to achieve and how they did it. Find out about their process, but don’t weigh this too heavily.

No project is the same with repeatable ‘methods’. Remember it is the quality and experience of the people you are buying, not a process.

 

10. Don’t expect the answer upfront

We’re exploring together so don’t feel nervous when a design team doesn’t know the answer. The best answer is we’ll find out together but we’re here to guide you.

I’ve been asked a lot for ‘the answer’ or ‘the concept’ in tender documents and the reality is there is no possible way I can tell you. What I can do, is show you where we’re tackled a similar problem but until we get stuck into your organisation and users, I can’t tell you the right route forward.

That is what service design is about, we’re here to take you on a journey to find the right insight and help make a design decision.

This doesn’t mean a design team shouldn’t have ideas. Ask them what questions they would have for you. You want them to be curious and to be ‘thinkers’ who will help uncover the right route forward.

 

11. Respect the time to think and design

Often tender documents focus on exact days we will ‘deliver’ and what the output is at each stage. For example, for a day of ‘Sensemaking’ what is the output?

The output is a team with the knowledge to design the right thing. But we’re pushed to create outputs that symbolise we’ve ‘done’ this.

I’ve been genuinely queried on ‘time’ that we’ve baked into a proposal for the team to actually design. What they’re doing here is sketching, discussing, researching, prototyping and it doesn’t always need an output.

It seems we’ve forgotten in the world of Service Design that people who are experts still need the space to think.

I 100% stand behind joined sense making workshops and co-design but we need to strike a balance. When we’re not with you, we’re still delivering and sometimes the researchers or designers just need time to think.

I know this point may sound ludicrous, but it happens fairly frequently in commissioning design, to not actually consider the budget to create freedom to just, well, design.

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="758"] In roughly 50% of proposals, we’re asked to break down projects by exact days[/caption]

12. Buy time not days

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve spent breaking down a day by day delivery to make a budget work. It’s painstaking, and I’d say 95% of the time changes as soon as we meet the client.

It looks a bit like this;

Phase One Prepare research framework — 0.5 days Recruitment framework — 0.25 days Recruiting — 2 days Data and platform preparation — 0.5 days User research x 12 interviews — 4 days User research interview write up — 1 days

You get the picture. Now do this across a project that requires multiple skillsets, lasts over 12 months and you’re breaking down every day down to 0.25 of days to make a budget work and satisfy the commissioner.

Buy time, weekly blocks of time where people work with you on a problem to solve. It’s better for both organisation procuring and agency.

For example:

Phase One Sprint week one: User researcher ( 5 days) Service Designer (5 days) Project Manager (2 days)

Ask what each block will focus on and what the outcomes and outputs are for overall phases. Use this flexibly as a sprint based model and pause (through negotiation and trusting contracts) with your supplier, there’s nothing worse than buying dead time. Getting down to the above level of minutia is really a painstaking approach to negotiate how someone will work for you. Re-frame that to how someone can work with you.

 

13. Clarify what you mean by ‘on-site’

There’s an increase in asking agencies to work ‘on-site’. I totally get this, and we do it fairly frequently but clarify what you mean by this.

When we see on-site requirements we either a) don’t bid as we don’t think the team can travel daily to the site or b) tip the budget on the travel time and expenses to get there.

What I’ve found, is the reality of ‘working on-site’ daily isn’t actually expected as we’re out researching anyway, and our client likes to come to our studio anyway.

During the tendering process, just be explicit on what this means.

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1964"] After 3 days of writing an application for funding, we’re denied because we named one file wrong[/caption]

14. Usability test your procurement process

If I had a pound for every hour I’ve spent trying to understand how to respond, reading multiple documents and piecing together the ask, then responding into formatted templates that don’t work, I’d be rich.

It’s painstakingly hard sometimes when PDFs have input boxes that don’t work, codes for projects must be followed to the letter to save a file and there are complex questions without direct asks. It’s like a test in itself and that isn’t even about our response and proposal as experts.

Make it simple. Have a clear ask and make it easy to reply. Try giving your proposal to someone, even a few agencies to have a quick read and get feedback before formally putting it out.

Keep the questions and page expectations relevant to the contract cost.

Above all, make sure your submission forms work.

I have been close to tears at stages trying to fill in badly designed tender forms and that is not an exaggeration. Often it’s another 3 to 4 hours work.

I understand that this is often largely based on using outdated legacy technology to pass over briefs but there’s some simple techniques above in the documentation you provide to the questions you ask that could simplify the process greatly.

 

15. Tell us if you’ve done this before, and if it failed last time — why did it fail?

It is rare to find a client who hasn’t tried to do a major piece of strategic change before. It’s even rarer still to find one where that was a roaring success. Knowing what came before — what worked and what didn’t — is a great way to help an agency know what ideas or ways of working need to be avoided when delivering a piece of work.

Do people feel burned by a previous agency? Why was this and what should we do to ensure that doesn’t happen?

This is another helpful political question for an agency to gain an insight into who needs to be won over and how.

 

16. Meet the supplier

Above all, meet the supplier.

An initial phone call with potential suppliers either collaboratively or 1 to 1 is helpful for everyone involved. It may seem time intensive but in the long run will save resource by reducing any confusion of intent from the outset. Additionally, it allows organisations to decide not to respond.

Nothing works better than a follow up meeting to ask the questions you want answers to, and it helps the agency understand the full brief and what you’re looking for.

This can also be done, law permitting, by doing things like holding a supplier engagement call or recording a video of you and your team explaining the work. Overall it can help agencies to propose better teams and approaches.

I’ve written far too many proposals where we’ve been told that we haven’t been successful in the feedback call because what we wrote initially and what the client wanted were completely different.

Words can be a very ambiguous when it comes to mutually understanding a problem space.


I hope some of these are helpful. I don’t want this to sound like I’m crying over spilt milk — losing a tender is a natural part of any business and expected — but we could make it a lot smoother for everyone involved!

If you’d like to add any please tweet me @rufflemuffin and I’ll build them in with a repost.

I’d really like to thank Zoe Stanton at Us Creates for providing some good additions and eyes on this.

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Building a network around Design for Sustainability
Back in April, Snook was overwhelmed by the energy in the room at DOTI: From Service Design to Sustainable Environmental Action. The sense of urgency and excitement from fellow designers and organisations left us keen to keep up the discussion. We should be using design to address our global climate crisis. In response, we invited everyone back last week to transform our discussions into actionable ideas. Together we mapped out our design processes – from scoping projects and building teams, to managing live products/services and navigating policy implications. We then identified points along the way that required intervention.

Our big questions were:

  • How can we adapt our existing tools and processes to make them more sustainable?
  • Do they need to be replaced with new ways of working altogether?
  • What might these look like, and how can we prototype them?
By forming thematic working groups, we identified a variety of new principles and prototypes to test out in our own practices. To name a few, we recognised the following as barriers and opportunities for further work:
  • Finding ways to ask the hard questions: to ourselves and our clients, and at all stages of our project processes. For example: should we be designing this in the first place? Encouraging clients and organisations to identify their sustainability representatives and environmental policies at the start of projects might support this.
  • Bringing futures thinking into conversations now: to consider the long term impact of our work, potential future users and their needs, and how to avoid unintended outcomes. Building time into our projects to free up thinking and consider possible alternatives with our clients was favoured.
  • Working between scales: to navigate policy constraints that often result in red tape. While designers regularly aim to derive impact by working with influential organisations and policy-makers, community engagement and citizen’s/people’s assemblies can offer more direct routes to projects that avoid restrictions and extractive business models.
Our ambition now is to spark the beginnings of a design network across the UK that is dedicated to sustainable impact through design. We’re calling upon individuals with design and sustainability experience to connect, share their knowledge, and plan new projects around design for sustainability. In particular, we want to develop new processes, tools, and principles to prototype and embed within our design practices at scale. Register your interest in joining us here and we’ll send information about our online platforms and upcoming events.
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Anne Dhir talks about why data-and-design are brilliant bedfellows. I came to service design from a business background. Ever since I joined Snook 5 years ago, I have been keen to look at how service designers and data practitioners can work together to achieve greater impact.

It’s a two-way street

Service designers don’t need to become data analysts, and technologists don’t need to become service designers. However, we need to know each other well enough so that we can benefit from one another’s strengths.

We share a vision

When I talk to designers and data practitioners, in particular around open data, it strikes me that we often share a vision. The transparency and transformation agenda have a lot in common. We believe in evidence-based decision making, even if the evidence we specialise in – qualitative or quantitative – varies. We believe in open-ended innovation; that well-designed solutions benefit not only the immediate users, but have a positive impact on the wider ecosystem. We believe in continuous improvement.

We need to be aware of each other

As a project manager of a data project, do you ask your client: “Do you have a service design team we can involve?”. As a service design team, do you routinely invite a data team to your project kick-off? Or include them in your stakeholder mapping? To do: try to find these teams or people. It might not be a formal team; it may simply be someone with an interest. You might actually find allies who help you deliver better outcomes.

We need to better understand each other

We need to understand how our disciplines fit together, and what we can each bring to a project. Service designers want to design services as end-to-end experiences that help users achieve their goals, are practical for staff, and are sustainable so that organisations can continue to deliver them. Data experts help organisations manage their data efficiently, so that data can be an asset that enables evidence-based policies and decisions. To do: Interview data technologists to better understand them, in the same way that we interview users and stakeholders to design a service.

What data can we work on together?

When we talk about design and data, designers automatically think of quantitative data to support qualitative insights. However, what we’re talking about here is different. Firstly, it is about the data that the service needs to function. For example, a service that enables Council to collect council tax from residents needs data about the properties, such as size and location. It requires data about who lives in the property, their age and status. As designers, we need to pay more attention to the ‘inside’ of the form: the data that users enter into the forms that we create. Secondly, it’s the data that the service creates that might be used for the purpose of the service or for other purposes. For example, when businesses pay their tax to the Council, it creates a dataset not only about the businesses and their taxes, but also about the state of the local economy.

We need all the data

To design efficient and effective services, we need to consider the whole data spectrum, not just open data. Open data is the tip of the iceberg – the part that is visible to users outside the organisation – but policy making and continuous improvement require the full spectrum, including shared and closed data. If a Council is designing interventions to increase the resilience of the local economy, it needs to know about all businesses; including sole traders, unincorporated associations, and partnerships. Otherwise, it runs the risk of reaching erroneous conclusions. Service designers also need to include in their designs how the service might publish open data safely and efficiently to deliver benefits to wider ecosystem beyond the service users and providers. To do: Stay tuned! As part of a project funded by ODI, Snook created a toolkit to share service design tools with data practitioners interested in data-led service design. During the Service Design Network global conference, I facilitated a workshop with Sarah to build up the data skills of service designers. This is still a work in progress and if you’re interested, do get in touch.
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How design patterns can help deliver better journeys across providers.
We sit in a no-man’s-land. The contested space for bikes, buggies, wheelchairs, bags and the occasional pet. A man who has just been wheeled on board asks if I can pass his bags. The attendant has left them out of reach and he needs to work. He is smartly dressed and makes this commute twice a week. He travels to the city for work on Mondays and returns home on Thursday for the weekend. The attendants often leave his bags out of reach. Sometimes they put them on his lap as they push him through the station. This hurts his legs. He jokes that today he is glad to be on board. Sometimes he is left in the waiting room, watching his train departure time come and go without anyone coming to help him on board. He is forgotten. Occasionally, Passenger Assist forget to take him off the train. He remains on board, travelling up and down the line until someone helps him. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1892"] Illustration by Julia Scheele[/caption] Over years of conducting user research on buses, trains and planes, we’ve heard far too many stories like this. The Deaf student who ended up stuck on a train back at the depot after the service terminated early. He missed the audio announcement, and no one thought to check if there were people still on the train. The woman with the broken pelvis waiting for nearly an hour for someone to come and help her carry her bags between the train and taxi. The autistic child who was distraught at having to change trains three times in one journey and not being able to sit in the same seat. Too often we find out that people with a range of mental health issues consider navigating public transport too stressful. Negative experiences like these often lead to people giving up on public transport, feeling safer and happier in private vehicles. This though further segregates them from society. Once people have invested in a car, they are unlikely to switch back. There is some great work being done by the likes of NeatboxWest Midlands Railway and others to overcome many barriers to travel for people with a range of physical and mental health needs. These stories and many more have several common features:

1. Problems that could be designed-out in advance

Most of the issues could have been planned or designed-out in advance, by involving users in the design process and testing prototypes with a range of people before implementation. From physical challenges like the poles on trains that prevent wheelchair passengers from passing, or digital signs with road names being placed behind the wheelchair seat on some buses. To more complex challenges like the autistic child wanting to sit in the same seat number for a rail journey.

2. Friction at boundaries

The majority of challenges also occur in the changes between transport modes and providers. Where transport providers have a support service, this often does not cover the end-to-end passenger journey, only the part provided by that organisation. Providers need to help their customers reach their destination. This highlights a key opportunity for Mobility as a Service (MaaS) concepts to better connect multiple modes and create an easier journey for passengers with accessibility needs.
[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1892"] Illustration by Julia Scheele[/caption]

3. Human error and misunderstanding

Things go wrong with human interactions, often unintentionally and due to a lack of awareness. The heavy bags that were placed on the wheelchair user’s lap, the driver who announced the train termination over audio without realising there may be a Deaf passenger on board. All of the stories are everyday journeys that people should be able to make easily and without unnecessary stress. This suggests that staff roles need redesigning to provide a great experience. Ensuring all customer-facing staff have the right training, such as specific disability awareness and mental health first aid. Enough time to help people and treat them as individuals, emphasis on empathy as a job requirement, permission to be flexible when necessary. Research is also needed into the organisational processes and rules that are causing the current challenges.
[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1892"] Illustration by Julia Scheele[/caption]
 
We need to design services that meet the needs of people with both physical and mental health requirements. And this needs to be across all transport services, not just special apps that work in certain areas or for one provider.

Design patterns for accessible and inclusive transport

Service design patterns offer a great opportunity to create more accessible transport services. Design patterns stem from architectural practice, such as making sure steps on stairs are equally spaced for ease of walking. They have since been applied in the service design world by GDSProjects by If and here at Snook to ensure consistent experiences for users across multiple services. Defining accessible design patterns for transport services would enable all providers to adapt their services to meet a range of needs, without each provider having to conduct specific research or design individual apps. Good service experiences go far beyond apps and design patterns could be used for better experiences at stations, planning travel, face-to-face with staff and over the phone. Furthermore, a set of standards would help hold providers to account when things go wrong or fall beneath an acceptable level. At Snook, we want to develop service design patterns for accessible transport as part of our mission to help deliver better, more human-centred travel. We are looking for partners and are exploring funding options, so if you are interested in working together get in touch! Email curious@wearesnook.com with the subject line Design Patterns for Accessible Travel.
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[post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => data-design-and-the-weird-and-wonderful-possibilities [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=17106 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [14] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16985 [post_author] => 58 [post_date] => 2019-02-19 15:29:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-02-19 15:29:54 [post_content] => [post_title] => Inclusive design learnings [post_excerpt] => We believe it is our responsibility as designers to create services that are accessible to as many people as possible. 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[post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => service-design-with-cancer-research-uk [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=16695 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [16] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16679 [post_author] => 29 [post_date] => 2018-10-23 11:22:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-10-23 11:22:19 [post_content] => [post_title] => How design can build a new type of environmental activist [post_excerpt] => How design can build a new type of environmental activist. 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We’re helping 5rights get the word out on their call to action to make a submission to the Information Commission Office (ICO)'s consultation on the Age-Appropriate Design Code.
The 5Rights Foundation exists to ensure that children’s rights are observed online. Children’s rights are not optional, however inconvenient.
The Age-Appropriate Design Code was brought into UK legislation by Crossbench Peer, Baroness Kidron, with the support of Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, Lord Ashton of Hyde, Opposition Spokesperson, Lord Stevenson of Balmacara, Conservative Peer, Baroness Harding of Winscombe and Liberal Democrat Spokesperson, Lord Clement-Jones of Clapham.
It represents an opportunity to address the asymmetry of power between children and the technology they are using. 5Rights Foundation will make its own submission to the Information Commissioner’s Call for Evidence in September, their initial thoughts are here in a wider briefing.
Their key recommendations for the code are;
The Code must offer a high bar of data privacy by default.
This would reverse current industry norms and would apply, as standard, to all devices and online services likely to access a child or be accessed by children.
Routine failure by an online service to adhere to its own published rules including; joining age, community rules, terms and conditions and privacy notices, should be considered a breach of the Code and subject to enforcement penalties.
Geolocation must be off by default.
Unless a geolocation is service critical (to be determined by the Information Commissioner), it should be off by default.
Childhood Impact Assessments as standard for all existing services and products, and new services and products prior to launch.
The “move fast and break things” and “fail furiously” culture of the technology industry does not hold the best interests of the child as their primary consideration. Introducing child impact assessments before services and products are rolled out would circumvent some of the most obvious data risks. The Commissioner might consider using the Responsible Innovation Framework as defined by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.
The Code must introduce universal reporting standards (RRP).
By which we mean the steps a child takes, the information offered, and outcomes of reporting should be similar and therefore become familiar to a child as they grow up. We do not mean that a site cannot use its own brand or speak in their own branded voice.
The Code requires a commitment from government for enforcement.
Unless there is a meaningful likelihood of enforcement, then the ISS are not incentivised to implement the Code in ways that are robust and effective. The ICO needs sufficient expertise and resources, and given the huge wealth of some ISS, the backing from the treasury to fund enforcement.
Making a submission
You can make a submission to the ICO's consultation on the Age-Appropriate Design Code (closing date 19th September), either as an individual or an organisation. Further information on children's privacy and the Age-Appropriate Design Code can be found on the Information Commissioner's blog.
The 5rights foundation is always open to hearing your questions, thoughts and any additions or corrections on their briefing paper, which can be sent to info@5rightsframework.com.
It is important for the Information Commissioner to hear from a broad range of people, so if you know other people and organisations in your professional or personal life who care about the experience children have online, please encourage them to engage with the submission. They may do so independently but are also welcome to attend a briefing session held by Baroness Kidron on the following date;
Tuesday 4th September, 12:30 - 14:00 in Westminster.
If you would like to attend the session, please email info@5rightsframework.com.
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[post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => join-our-design-pattern-for-mental-health-workshop-online [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=16049 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [22] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16013 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2018-03-28 10:52:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-03-28 10:52:18 [post_content] => [post_title] => Designing mental health services with Public Policy Lab [post_excerpt] => Snook is hooking up with Public Policy Lab to map design patterns for designing mental health services. Here’s why and how you can help. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => designing-mental-health-services-with-public-policy-lab-and-snook [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=16013 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [23] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15802 [post_author] => 41 [post_date] => 2018-01-20 11:48:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-20 11:48:25 [post_content] => 3 solutions to Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene barriers Following our return from Uganda we will be working closely with the Welthungerhilfe team to co-design and prototype the following solutions:   We will be exploring the production of a minimum viable product (MVP) toolkit for rapidly assessing user needs and providing appropriate facilities for individuals affected in rapid-onset emergencies.The toolkit will aim to 'fast-track' solutions through human-centred design principles, and allow NGO partners to engage with communities through co-creation.   To address the prevalent issues of difficult terrain, ground conditions, and flooding, we will work with Welthungerhilfe to explore suitable options for creating raised dry composting latrines from local materials. We will also develop recommendations for sensitisation and implementation related to these, considering how to overcome the cultural barriers of using compost from the latrines to fertilise crops.   It is recognised that guidelines for standard household latrine construction in refugee settings are not designed to cater for the specific individual needs of PSNs. We will working closely with the Welthungerhilfe WASH engineers to prototype and test solutions together with PSNs, using local labour and cost-effective materials.   We will be working closely with the Welthungerhilfe team in Yumbe to guide the human-centred process, testing and iterating these designs. We look forward to seeing the next step. [post_title] => Using human-centred design to WASH [post_excerpt] => We visited settlements housing refugees in Northern Uganda to understand more about the about their journeys and living conditions. 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[post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => unsexy-side-service-design [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=15786 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [25] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15412 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2017-11-07 13:04:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-07 13:04:54 [post_content] => [post_title] => Konichiwa! Let’s talk service design [post_excerpt] => This November, Sarah has a great line of talks in and around Japan. Find out more here. 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Sarah Drummond, Valerie Carr and Andy Young explore how a service design approach can facilitate co-design of supportive communities for older people.

Design for Health (2017) illustrates the history of the development of design for health, the various design disciplines and domains to which design has contributed. There are 26 case studies in the book revealing a plethora of design research methodologies and research methods employed in design for health.

We’re delighted that this book has finally been published and Snook’s work is presented alongside some very interesting projects and reflections on the role of design in improving health and well-being.

As a former member of staff at Imagination Lancaster, I worked with Prof Rachel Cooper on a number of projects from 2009-2012 before moving to work at Snook. Rachel has amazing energy and commitment to highlighting the value of design in improving health and wellbeing. She is a series editor for the Routledge Series, Design for Social Responsibility, and this book, Design for Health is the latest in the series.

“The purpose of this book is to summarise the current state of knowledge about the use and application of design in health.”

Design for ageing well

In 2014, Emmanuel Tsekleves, who is co-editor of this book, invited us to write a chapter as part of the theme ‘Design for ageing well’. We were asked to provide a brief introduction to service and co-design approaches with older people and focus on case studies showing how Snook had developed and applied service design methods and tools in our work with older people. We submitted our chapter in 2015 so the projects discussed are not our most up-to-date. They do showcase three quite disparate projects that all involved older people in co-designing services to enable them to maintain well-being and remain active in their own homes and local communities. Snook’s chapter is titled ‘Exploring how a service design approach can facilitate co-design of supportive communities and service frameworks for older people’. We discuss three specific projects – the methods and tools used and we reflect on the learnings.
  1. BRIDGE (Building Relationships in Deprived General Practice Environments)
  2. Care Information Scotland Service Redesign
  3. Responsive Interactive Advocate (RITA)
  [caption id="attachment_14761" align="aligncenter" width="1024"]bridge project BRIDGE project workshop. Image: Snook[/caption]

BRIDGE

BRIDGE stands for Building relationships in deprived general practice environments. This project used participatory methods with staff in general practices, community organisations and older people. This was done to understand, co-design and ‘road-test’ a system in which general practices in deprived areas identified older people in need and helped them access resources and/or participate in activities known to help prevent or delay disablement and enhance well-being. [caption id="attachment_14762" align="aligncenter" width="1024"]cis_workshop Care Information Scotland: project workshop. Image: Snook[/caption]

Care Information Scotland Service Redesign

This project used participatory methods with staff in general practices, community organisations and older people to understand, co-design and ‘road-test’ a system in which general practices in deprived areas identified older people in need and helped them access resources and/or participate in activities known to help prevent or delay disablement and enhance well-being.

Responsive Interactive Advocate (RITA)

RITA has been developed as an avatar-based support system under Innovate UK’s Long Term Care Revolution. A reference group of older people (aged between 54 and 81) were involved in the co-design of the RITA service concept and helped to identify the challenges and opportunities for a digitally-based support system.

The conclusion

We finally sum up the learning from the different projects and conclude that a key element of effective services for the ageing population will be their ability to integrate a whole person with a whole systems approach. Fragmented services delivered in isolation cannot solve the intractable problems of sustainability in both human and economic terms.

“We believe that service systems and service design approach provides the methods and tools to respond to the complexity of multi-layered services, and enables and supports people to co-design new, dynamic and personalised service models that help create a network of supportive communities that will enable us all to age well in place.”

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To design a service helping job seekers gain work experience. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => auburn [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=14609 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [32] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14565 [post_author] => 26 [post_date] => 2017-04-28 09:53:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-28 09:53:43 [post_content] => [post_title] => From graphic design to service design [post_excerpt] => This month marked Marie's one-year Snookversary. This is her journey as a graphic designer being dropped into the world of service design. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => graphic_design_to_service_design [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=14565 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [33] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 14427 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2017-03-29 16:49:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-29 16:49:00 [post_content] => [post_title] => Designing services is everyone’s business | SDinGov 2017 conference reflections [post_excerpt] => Ten SDinGov conference reflections: a summary that is not a critique of what we didn’t see but a call to arms to do more in these areas. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sdingov-17 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=14427 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [34] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13887 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2016-11-24 09:30:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-11-24 09:30:56 [post_content] => [post_title] => Designing movements like a service [post_excerpt] => Featuring on the cover of The Service Gazette, a new publication for service innovators, Sarah shares 3 poignant learnings over her career [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => designing-movements-like-service [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=13887 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [35] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13678 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2016-10-26 11:59:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-26 11:59:42 [post_content] => [post_title] => Launching our design lab with Strathclyde University [post_excerpt] => Snook is launching a new design lab module as part of Strathclyde University new Masters in Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Technology. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => launching-our-design-lab-with-strathclyde-university [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=13678 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [36] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 12856 [post_author] => 16 [post_date] => 2016-09-05 12:51:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-05 12:51:58 [post_content] => At Snook, we always make sure that the projects we do with young people are engaging, and endeavour to use co-design in a way that is truly meaningful for everyone involved. Since 2010, we’ve ran a number of projects with young people, and we want to share what we’ve learned along the way. Alongside Young Scot, we created The Matter – a project where young people create their own newspaper and gain employability skills. For Aye Mind, a collaboration with Mental Health Foundation, Young Scot, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde, we worked with young people to create digital tools for mental wellbeing. We’re currently developing Badgemaker where young people will be able to gain badges for their skills. Here are our tips and methods.

1. A more meaningful icebreaker

During a workshop, you only have a short time with the participants. So why waste their time on an icebreaker? It is important to make everyone in the room feel comfortable from the beginning, no matter what age they are. But it’s a good idea to use an icebreaker that will feed into the subject that you’re investigating. We ran workshops with young people to find out what they wanted to see in mental wellbeing provision online. We kicked off the workshops with making playlists of feel-good tunes. This activity meant we had music to listen to during the workshop and a collection of songs young people liked. The research we had carried out in an earlier phase of the project showed that music was a really positive mood-lifter, so we took the songs gathered in the playlists and shared them online through Aye Mind’s social media.

2. Don’t reinvent the wheel

When we worked with young people to promote alcohol awareness, we used the game Never Have I Ever. The game is usually a drinking game, but we used it to get young people talking about the tricky topic of alcohol awareness. Rather than creating a completely new activity, it’s a good idea to tap into things that are already understood. During the game everyone stands in a circle, we let everyone know what the subject we’ll be talking about is. The first person stands in the middle and says ‘Never Have I Ever… Tried a Beer’. Everyone in the circle who has had a beer swaps places until someone is left in the middle of the circle - then it’s their turn to ask the next question. Using simple, familiar games create an atmosphere where young people can share as little or as much as they want about the subject you are designing for.

3. Make a plan, then throw it away!

Any workshop is unpredictable, it’s hard to judge what people will respond to. We put a big focus on doing not talking and some of the most interesting ideas will come out of making and doing rather than simply asking questions and talking. We always go into workshops with an agenda that plans out every minute, back-end and front-end. The back-end of the agenda highlights what we, the facilitators, will be doing at any given time. The front-end of the agenda is the part that people will experience, the activities they will be doing. We’ll go into a workshop armed with our own service design tools tailored to the occasion, post-its, big paper and whatever tech toys are appropriate. We might use all of it or none of it. We’re more than happy to throw the agenda out the window if we see it isn’t working. It’s a great idea to have simple activities up your sleeve if something isn’t working. For example; How to Squeeze a Lemon is a technique you can use for quick idea generation. Everyone gathers around a wall with post-its and sharpies in hand. They have 1 minute to write down as many ways to squeeze a lemon as they possibly can. It gets ideas flowing. Plus, it’s fun. It’s about quantity of ideas and not quality.

4. If an activity works for 16 – 25 year olds, it’ll work for everyone

We designed a mental wellbeing GIF and meme-making workshop for young people as part of our Aye Mind project. The first time we did the workshop was with a group of young people at the Riverside Museum where we played games and made mini-personas to talk about mental wellbeing. Young people had the chance to get their hands on cameras, tripods, coloured paper, play-doh, lego and toys to set up their own images with positive mental wellbeing messages. Since then, we’ve ran a shorter version of the workshop at conferences for adults working in the mental wellbeing sector across Scotland. Over that time, we’ve produced about 400+ Memes and shared them online, we even had #AyeMind trending during the Aye Mind launch.

5. What would work for you?

Take a minute to remember what it was like when you were that age and remember what worked for you. There’s a tendency when working with young people to feel like everything should be ‘cool’, use slang or have graffiti-style graphics. In reality, a well-thought out, hands-on, and active workshop will work for young people just as much as it’ll work for adults.

6. Safety first

Safety and fun are the most important part of any kind of user engagement. They come before any aims of any workshop or interview. Our Snook staff are PVG checked, most are first aiders and mental health first aiders. We always meet young people with their own support worker whether that’s a teacher or youth worker. Make sure people you’re working with are fed, watered, happy and healthy as well as feeling safe and having breaks when they need to. This is much more important than running through all the exercises you have planned. Screen Shot 2016-01-08 at 12.59.51

7. Don’t preach to the choir

When we ran Whose Round, (a project for NHS GCC working with Young Scot) an alcohol awareness campaign for and by young people, we didn’t just talk to people when they were sober. On a Friday night, the streets of Glasgow are full of people having wild nights out, so we took to the streets with Whose Round branded cones, cards and merchandise. At freshers fairs we gave out hangover grab bags and we even went out on Halloween dressed as pumpkins to spread the Whose Round message. We like to tackle the problem head one.

8. Get out

Meaningful, interesting work doesn’t usually happen in your own studio. When we’ve worked on projects for and by young people, we go to the places they feel comfortable. When working with Includem, a charity that supports young people transitioning away from services, Keira found McDonalds was a great place to meet. The young people she was speaking to didn’t want to have a meeting about their experiences in an institution, they were more comfortable chatting while having some fries. We hope these tips are useful to you. You can always come chat to us about user engagement and co-design with young people. Just email curious@wearesnook.com [post_title] => 7 Tips for Co-Design with Young People [post_excerpt] => How to ensure that the projects we do with young people are engaging and that we use co-design in a meaningful and beneficial way. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => co-design-young-people [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=12182 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [37] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 12849 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2016-07-21 10:51:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-07-21 10:51:17 [post_content] => The first design-led adventure in London and Scotland is here - a joint venture between us and On-Off Group. Design Safari discovers Service Design and UX from companies who live by it and focuses on how to create a modern design-led organisation.  This is your chance to get on the inside of companies who are putting design at the heart of their delivery in the UK. Design Safari takes place this September with the first instalment of a series of events focusing on service design and user experience (UX) taking place across the globe in 2016 and 2017.
The inaugural “design-led adventure will be hosted in London and Scotland by organisations including technology giant IBM, media powerhouse Pearson PLC, the largest tech incubator in the UK, CodeBase, and the world’s number two travel search site, Skyscanner. In the face of widespread industry research showing that every company needs to harness design to succeed in the 21st century, there has been a high demand for the limited places available on Design Safari and we encourage applications to be made by early August.
"We know that for every £1 spent on design there is a £4 gain in net operating profit, over £20 net turnover and over £5 net exports. Design and a focus on user experience is now viewed as a critical competitive strength across companies of all sizes, helping organisations design and develop services that work and deliver value to people. We have put together an adventure that takes people into the heart of businesses who have adopted and are embedding this approach to see how some of the UK's best-of-class manage the process within their own organisations.”

- Sarah Drummond, Co-founder and Managing Director, Snook

The 5-day safari takes in London, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Loch Lomond and includes all visits, masterclasses, domestic UK travel, hotels and meals and will also be hosted by STV, the Scottish Government, Design Informatics, Loch Lomond National Park. [caption id="attachment_11997" align="aligncenter" width="1024"]Design Safari Design Safari: click on the image to find out more and register to participate[/caption]  

UX

As one of the fastest growing segments of the modern economy, UX is integral to global innovation, product success and business transformation. The corporate world is investing more in UX than ever before in 2016 but many are failing to fully leverage it. Since 2010, 27 companies founded by designers were acquired by larger companies like Google, Facebook, Yahoo!, Adobe, Dropbox, and LinkedIn. Russell Morgan CEO of On-Off Group UK said:
“The numbers don’t lie and whether you’re talking about a mobile app or a website, if you want customers to engage with the company and its products user experience is paramount. The companies who succeed over the next few years will be the ones who make design front and centre of everything they do. The whole concept of service design and UX scares a lot of people but it’s not as complicated to put in place than many people think.”
Steve Pearce, Global Design Director at Skyscanner, said:
“Design is everywhere. Design leader-ship stops it from being “all over the place”. Skyscanner has embraced design thinking and we ensure everything we now make has the braintrust of Engineering, Product and Design guiding it’s creation. We know we’re not perfect, but you’ll see how we’re now ensuring the design team is aligned as a team and with the organisation and can deliver real value to our customers and partners. Design is one of the few disciplines that is both art and science. When opertationlised well, it has a wonderful capacity to tangibly envision the future, and to glue desperate concepts together into coherent and meaningful experiences. We are at an inflection point on our journey to becoming the worlds most trusted and used travel brand. You’ll see first hand how 2 of our 11 offices feel at different stages: our London office just starting out, and our Edinburgh office in full capacity. You’ll also see what we’re doing globally, bringing coherency, consistency and continuity to our design system.”
 

Contacts

Russell Morgan +44(0)7555-902-382 russ@onoffgroup.com http://www.designsafari.co
[post_title] => Pioneering Service Design & UX programme Design Safari showcases design journey of IBM, Pearson PLC and Skyscanner [post_excerpt] => The first design-led adventure in London and Scotland is here - a joint venture between us and On-Off Group. Design Safari discovers Service Design and UX from companies who live by it and focuses on how to create a modern design-led organisation. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => design-safari-launch [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=11996 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [38] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11986 [post_author] => 23 [post_date] => 2016-07-12 09:02:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-07-12 09:02:11 [post_content] => Design Disruptors is a documentary created by InVision. It explores more than 15 companies, valued more than $1 trillion, that have one crucial thing in common - using design thinking approaches to overtake the industry by design. Disruptive design is best explained with the words Uber, Airbnb and Netflix. After enjoying some refreshments and popcorn, we took our seats in the London Palladium amongst many other creatives. The film was shown and an interview with Tobias van Schneider, formerly Spotify, followed after. Design Disruptors explains how disruptive companies have gone from being small start-ups to the world's leading technology companies. The movie itself presents deep conversations with design leaders and product designers from across the globe showing their work behind the scenes. The key to their success is being customer-centric and re-thinking the way that services have been designed before. 
“Understanding how design directly impacts your user makes you powerful. That power makes you dangerous to incumbents.”

- Braden Kowitz, Design Partner at Google Ventures

Uber or Lyft being a great example of this. The taxi service was created to solve the issue of getting around a city quickly and economically but; yet with technology we now demand more than just that from a service. Through designing in a customer-centric way, companies create world changing products that make lives easier.
“If your design looks pretty but doesn’t tell a story or create relationships with your people, you’ve failed.”

- Bob Baxley, Head of product design at Pinterest

[caption id="attachment_11992" align="alignleft" width="900"]InVision_DesignDistuptors Just before the movie starts. Photo credit: InVision, Facebook album[/caption] Design Disruptors looks in-depth at an area that has not been covered in the media much before and really highlights the importance of design in future products and services. The question is: will it be the next must see documentary? See the photo album of the London premier here. The Scottish premier of the movie will be in Edinburgh on 1st August, 6pm at CodeBase - make sure you get your tickets [post_title] => Snook at the London Palladium for the long-awaited Design Disruptors premier [post_excerpt] => Design Disruptors is a documentary created by InVision looking at the transformative power of design. Few of our Snooks went along to the London premier, here's what happened there. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => design-disruptors [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=11986 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [39] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11868 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2016-06-17 10:44:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-06-17 10:44:57 [post_content] => Last week on Friday 10th June 2016, Alex and Marie presented at UX Scotland. The conference had diverse delegates, engaging speakers and interactive workshops. It was great to see talks about service design during all three days. Whilst sharing our work on two projects - HullCoin and Glasgow City Council website re-development, Alex and Marie highlighted the importance of putting people first when designing great user experience.  

Check out their presentations slides. It all starts with a story of a dead badger... 

 

Putting people first: UX through a service design lens from Snook
  [post_title] => Putting people first: UX through a service design lens [post_excerpt] => Last week, Alex and Marie presented at UX Scotland. Check out their presentation on putting people first: UX through a service design lens. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snooktalk-uxscotland-16 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=11868 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [40] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11824 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2016-06-09 14:12:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-06-09 14:12:15 [post_content] => Ever said to yourself 'there must be a better way of doing this'? If yes, then this workshop is for you.  Join us for a speedy one day workshop to find out about new ways of solving problems that matter to your organisation. You will get hands-on experience of using a set of tools and techniques which have been shown to improve how universities can re-design key services and processes such as:  

Got you interested? Here are the details:

Date: Thursday 7th July 2016 Venue: Regent’s University, London Address: Regent’s Park campus, Inner Circle, Regent’s Park, London NW1 4NS Room: Knapp Gallery Time Allocation: 10:30am to 4:00pm The cost is £150 per person (excluding VAT) and bookings are now open online. Click here to access the online booking form.

Previous workshop participants said:

“The workshop was great for getting into a more creative mind-set with which to approach service design, and encouraged me to try more things out and worry less about doing it the right way” “It was all applicable and wonderfully practical! The Journey mapping and service blueprints were a highlight.”
 

Facilitators

This workshop will be delivered by Jean Mutton and Sarah Drummond.

Questions?

This workshop is organised by SROC. If you have any questions, please email our Training team at training@wearesnook.com   [post_title] => Service Design for Higher Education workshop | London [post_excerpt] => Ever said to yourself 'there must be a better way of doing this'? If yes, then this workshop is for you. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => service-design-higher-education-workshop-london [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=11824 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [41] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11372 [post_author] => 16 [post_date] => 2016-04-28 17:45:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-04-28 17:45:53 [post_content] => We have a tradition going on here: since 2009, industrial design students from Auburn University come over for a visit and a Service Design training workshop. Charlotte and Eve facilitated these intense two days of researching, prototyping, testing and iterating. And, of course, there was a rubber chicken. Here’s an overview of what happened.

The Brief

We challenged the #AuburnSnooks to re-imagine mental wellbeing for students. Based on the Aye Mind project, we asked how to improve the mental health and wellbeing of young people by making better use of the Internet, social media and mobile technologies. This gave the students an insight into a real industry brief and encouraged them to tackle a difficult problem that might affect them and their fellow students.

Let’s Discover

We kicked off with a presentation of design methods and teaching the students the Double Diamond design process. Most of the students were unfamiliar with it but pretty eager to learn more!

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100 ways to destroy an Iphone

The first challenge was to come up with 100 ways to destroy an Iphone in under a minute. This was a brilliant way to get everyone’s brain thinking about generating ideas quickly and easily.

The Discovery

We moved onto researching the problem. Research methods included interviews, group discussions and surveys to gain a deeper understanding of students’ mental wellbeing. The important element here was research planning, understanding of what’s out there and exploring/thinking about how younger people behave online. It was also key to talk to strangers, or each other about how mental wellbeing effected them, the challenge was to go deeper into the problem, and find out from real people how this issue effected them. Gaining this understanding would be key to designing solutions that really worked later on. Teams had an opportunity to think about what questions they wanted to ask and which methods would be best suited for this. The questions ranged from ‘What does mental wellbeing mean to you?’ to ‘What makes you smile?’ As both Charlotte and Eve work on the Ayemind project, it was interesting to hear the discussions #AuburnSnooks were having - for example, a common theme was the difference between ‘mental wellbeing’ and ‘mental illness’ and the stigma attached to language surrounding these.

IMG_5587

Get Defining

From speaking to their peers face-to-face, online and talking to people on the street about the topic, groups gathered many insights. At this stage, it was important to get ALL of these insights out on post-its notes while chatting within groups. We chose a few insights and generated ideas around them using the Lotus Flower Idea Generation technique. Teams were encouraged to go around and comment on each other’s post-its. We then encouraged students to really quickly Freeze Frame four ideas, and prototype one. The Freeze Frame involved taking an idea, and showing a still of how it would work with your body as a group. That way, they could bring their ideas to life. The emphasis was on having fun and being speedy (plus silly) - an important part of workshops and hack events.

IMG_5616

Now Develop

Rapid idea generating and prototyping allowed the teams to hone in on one idea. They used Opportunity Cards to outline the idea, explore the problem it addresses and how it looks like. The User Journey Map allowed students to think about all the touchpoints/interactions of their service and how the user would experience it. After developing a rough prototype of the idea, the rubber chicken walked everyone out of the door and thus, encouraged further testing and iteration of the prototype and idea. For some of the groups, this meant going out onto the street to see what people thought of their idea, for others it meant observing how people interact and react to the idea. Getting early feedback allowed the students to come back for more iteration. They experienced the process of iterating an idea/product/service with the user in mind.

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Aaaand Deliver!

The close of our two-day workshop was called ‘Show & Not Tell’ - show us your idea, don’t tell us what it is, let us feel it, smell it, interact with it. The #AuburnSnooks presented their prototypes back to each other, their tutor and three designers from Snook. They received feedback on what they had developed. And a big round of applause for working so hard over the two days. Here are the five ideas teams developed: IMG_5766
Friendr App
An app that allows you to connect with people when you arrive at a new place, like a new University. This group encouraged the use of technology in terms of ‘making social media social again’. Insights gathered during research and testing showed that we are all human beings and we love interactions. When we’re trying to find our feet at a new location, we like talking to friends and meeting people with similar interests.
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Happy Coffee Cups
Positive messages on coffee cups and cup warmers to help us feel positive about our day. What makes you smile? This was one of the questions the group explored during research. It’s all about the little things in life and making your day. Even though the team struggled to test these at the coffee shops in Glasgow, we definitely have been enjoying seeing them on our Snook mugs! Smiles all the way.
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Sports App
An app that helps young people find other people to play their favourite sports with, based on location. The group found that sport could have a positive effect on mental wellbeing. They found that playing team sports on campus was difficult to organise, especially when students first arrived. They developed a prototype of their app and tested it at Sports Direct, and found people who were willing to use it. IMG_5686
Solitude Campaign
A campaign encouraging students to enjoy spending time alone. Self-awareness and reflection can do wonders. It’s important to stop every now and again and not being afraid to be alone for a bit. During research here, it was raised that social media/technology doesn’t sleep so we might feel overwhelmed by it all at different points of our lives. But it’s me time now!
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Reflect
A journal where students can write their diary entry, and highlight the positive parts. During research the group learned that the process of writing in a journal allowed for reflection, which is positive for mental wellbeing. When you look back at your diary entries only the highlighted part will appear. Reflect can be an app, a physical diary, or this group even tested out using a google form. We’ll be excitedly following what happens with the ideas now and whether teams will be implementing them back home. It was fantastic to have this bunch of #AuburnSnooks! We wish them all the best and we look forward seeing you again soon. If we got you interested in Service Design training workshops for students, why not get in touch with the Snook Training team? Drop us an email: training@wearesnook.com [post_title] => Service Design Training: 20 industrial designers explore the role of digital in students’ mental wellbeing [post_excerpt] => Service Design Training: 20 industrial designers explore the role of digital in students’ mental wellbeing. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => service-design-auburn2016 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=11372 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [42] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11271 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2016-04-18 13:03:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-04-18 13:03:47 [post_content] => Jean Mutton is a pioneer when it comes to the application of service design principles in improving the student experience. Before setting up her consultancy company ‘Go Process Design Ltd’, Jean spent over 30 years working in management in the Higher Education sector. Jean is working with us to bring service design training and consultancy services to colleges and universities.  Here's a reblog from the Efficiency Exchange where Jean explains how service design can help organisations and staff better understand the student journey. 

Human-centred design and the HE sector

In recent times, we have heard a lot of universities say that they are putting the ‘student at the heart of what we do’ and the ‘student experience’ has become a Key Performance Indicator for some. At the same time, many organisations are looking to be more effective whilst reducing costs. Too much to ask? No, not really, but it depends on how you go about it. A key approach which is rapidly gaining ground in the HE sector is to use human-centred design to make services more useful, usable and efficient. There is already plenty of evidence of how this approach has impacted on public service delivery – for one example see the SPIDER project.

The student journey

A good place to start is to map out the student journey to better understand what the ‘student experience’ looks like from the student point of view. Using the tools and techniques of service design such as storyboarding and service blueprinting can help you capture the holistic service experience – both top level personal interactions and also the back office processes which support them. persona In order to put together a student journey map it is helpful to build up a set of a dozen or so personas, which should reflect the constituent characteristics of your student body – ethnicity, modes of study, gender, undergraduate and postgraduate etc. Personas also give everyone involved a deeper understanding of what is driving students and also what de-motivates them, providing the often missing emotional connection. A set of personas can be drawn up quite easily, starting out with just some blank paper and pens, ideally in a workshop setting, by key staff who work closely with students and by the students themselves. For the next step, it should be decided what aspect of the student journey is being mapped – is it at a service interaction at a micro level, or is it the macro ‘end-to-end’ student journey? If the former, there will need to be a lot of detail captured about the ‘felt experience’ and who is providing both the front office and back office support should be clarified. One benefit is that in drawing up the map, staff working in various departments will gain a better understanding of how ‘their bit’ fits into the grand scheme of things, by making them step outside of their silo and see the service journey through the eyes of the student, the end-user of the service. CJM and persona CJM3 For example, a key aspect of the student journey is communications – by mapping comms across the institution you will get an insight into just how confusing uni life can be.  A personal anecdote here demonstrates this – when my son was accepted at one of the large Yorkshire unis he received a letter on a Wednesday from his department, wanting to be the first to welcome him.  Great you may think – so did he.  The next day, he got a letter from the Students’ Union, also welcoming him, and wanting to be the first to do so.  Okay….., he thought.  By the time he got the letter on the Friday from the Accommodation Department, also wanting to be the first to welcome him, he was getting just a little sceptical.  And that was before he had even started! In my 30 years working in the HE sector, I have used lots of different approaches to improve systems and procedures and I am a fan of Lean, Systems Thinking and Design Thinking, but for me, the best one that can really evidence impact and get to the heart of making sustainable change is Service Design. This is why I have teamed up with the award-winning service design company Snook to deliver a series of training workshops specifically for the sector.

Got you interested? 

The next event is in Lancaster on Thursday, 5th May. For more details and to book your tickets, click on the image below. Snook training_Lancaster [post_title] => Using service design techniques to map the student journey [post_excerpt] => Jean Mutton is a pioneer when it comes to the application of service design principles in improving the student experience. Here she explains how service design can help organisations and staff better understand the student journey. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => mapping-student-journey [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=11271 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [43] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11267 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2016-04-14 15:41:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-04-14 15:41:36 [post_content] => On the 4th and 5th April, On-Off Group hosted the Service Design Summit in Manila, Philippines. Sarah Drummond was there and ran a practical hands-on workshop during the first day of the event. Below is a re-blog from the Inquirer. The innovation focused event drew large numbers of people, from Chief Executives to frontline support staff. The Summit showcased how Design Thinking is used to innovate products and services and make businesses more appealing to customers. The two-day event included a practical workshop from UK based Service Design expert Sarah Drummond and case studies from local companies such as Ideaspace, Habi Lab Education, Cebu Pacific, Curiosity, Security Bank, Kalibrr, The Office of Senator Bam Aquino and the On-Off Group.

Designing Government Services

Drummond’s government-themed workshop taught attendees how to research citizen problems and needs, generate ideas and prototype products and services that are valued by the people who need them. The focus was not just fixing the symptoms of the problem but diving deeper to find the root cause. “Design is completely 100% about people. It’s not about you, the designer, it’s about who you are designing for.”, stressed Drummond. “For every service there’s a front stage and a back stage. It’s not just what customers see online, it’s about how people behind the scenes work too.”

Local Case Studies

Some local Philippines have already embraced Design Thinking, Service Design and Customer Experience and speakers shared valuable insights and stories about the benefits of implementing these practices – as well as some of the challenges. “We’re trying to deliver the best experience possible for our customers.” – said Gerry Dy of Security Bank.”, who demonstrated some of the innovative services the company had recently designed for customers. Some of the challenges highlighted by speakers included the problem of getting the whole company to adopt a customer-centered mindset and measuring the return on investment.

Audience Feedback

The event received high praise from audience members, who came away with an appreciation for how Design Thinking enables businesses to differentiate themselves in the market and build sustainable competitive advantage. “Two of the most valuable and educational days of my life.” “I learned many new things that I can apply in my everyday work.” “Learning from the experiences of the speakers was good so we can understand what made the project a success and also see what mistakes we need to avoid.” Read more: http://technology.inquirer.net/47659/innovating-business-with-design-thinking#ixzz45oYJaCFE [post_title] => Philippines: Innovating business with design thinking [post_excerpt] => On the 4th and 5th April, On-Off Group hosted the Service Design Summit in Manila, Philippines. Sarah Drummond was there and ran a practical hands-on workshop during the first day of the event. Below is a re-blog from the Inquirer. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => innovating-business-with-design-thinking [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=11267 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [44] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11050 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2016-03-14 13:34:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-03-14 13:34:34 [post_content] => When I was 20 years old, I was given the opportunity as a designer to enter the public sector. I went inside the machine and was confused about why we weren't designing services the same way we made chairs: people first, understanding our materials, testing iteratively before the final production. Quite the opposite in fact, we were doing to people not for. Top down, prescriptive policy and delivering services as process charts; expecting people to use what we'd created. During this period, I became fascinated by how Government and public services work (and don't work) and where design principles (and designers) could add value. Working as a public servant, developing digital public services back from 2007-10, I undertook a Masters focusing on mapping design across the public sector and how policy moves from the strategy unit to the services we see. This period pre-dated initiatives such as Government Digital Service and many of the innovation labs that were being set up by public sector/government. It was an exciting time and a very new concept that had been brewing for many years before I came to it. I was lucky to become one of a new cohort of designers entering the public sector to redesign services. I built on practice like Sophia Parker’s innovation labs in Kent County Council, leaders in the field like Futuregov and Engine who were launching 'The journey to the interface' and the innovation bodies like Nesta who were discussing Co-production, user led innovation and innovation for public services.

Service Design in Government

In 2014, I gave the Keynote at Service Design in Government. My brief from the organisers was to talk simply through the tools of Service Design, methods and some practical case studies. Having been in the field for a fair bit of time already, we wanted to see service design progressing to hit the mainstream, but we weren't quite there yet. I knew this was a ‘basics’ presentation, getting people behind the mindset of creating people-centred services that work end-to-end across public and government services. Fast forward 3 years and I’m standing alongside our client Camilla Buchanan from the Cabinet Office with Cassie Robinson of The Point People who were our collaborators on the Designing Social Investment project and report.
Designing Social Investment - Cabinet Office UK, Snook & The Point People We're talking openly about researching the needs of users in the social investment field, what we're discovering, how we're creating guiding principles for the sector to be led by the Cabinet Office and how we're prototyping new products and services for the social investment marketplace. We're talking side by side, honestly and openly exploring the challenges of where design is supporting development of better informed policy. In fact, other agencies like Live|Work are talking alongside Department for Health and Us Creates with NHS England. This is an exciting time. A really really exciting time with huge potential to get this right. But we need to keep pushing! I can feel it again. It has been a really hard slog talking the same process and ideas for years but you know what? We are getting somewhere. SDinGov 2016 was a great testament to this. It's conferences like this that are like a mirror, they play back to you the progress that's been made. It's easy to get beaten down, or feel like the same message has been playing for years. Believe me it has, and long before I was in the industry or even studying; but it's exciting to see it being put into action. I think there were more people from across government and public sector bodies presenting than practice-based designers.

Here are my key takeaways

There are exceptional standards of practice and structures being developed at the highest level Government Digital Service is gaining huge traction and their approach is spreading to other bodies. Their exceptional service manual outlines savings produced, an approach to user needs first, end-to-end service design, service standards, service pattern talk and fantastic work from Alistair Duggin on accessibility. Whilst it’s got a digital focus, they're now embedding the foundations and platforms to scale this across all of Government. And other bodies are embedding design too (UKTI, Ministry of Justice, Home Office). It is fantastic to finally see such a united approach to getting service basics right. Service redesign and meeting needs is about designing the organisation I've shared widely Ben Holliday's post on fixing broken windows. Ben is right – successful companies put design at the centre of everything they do. Everything in your organisation should be designed to work for people: on the inside and outside from onboarding process to communication systems and data sets making the service work. Service is everyone's and everything's business What was great to hear Louise Downe, Head of Design at GDS, pointing out is that we're approaching all of this through a service design lenses. She explained that they're not just redesigning forms, or a digital interface, they're looking at everything that makes for a better service: from CSS codes and making sure text is readable by assistive technology, to the loading time on screen, the way we name services and the data sets they're cleaning up.
There is an emergent common language There was a common language being used. This is great. If we have the foundations in place about putting people first and end-to-end journeys, we can begin to build the platforms and structures we need in place to make this a reality. We are all figuring this out - and in the open It felt like everyone was honest, and sharing both their successes and failures, live on stage. This is a principle of a design-led approach, critical debate on the right thing to do and why certain decisions are made. Governments were using hackpads, open Google Docs and Wikis to document learnings and ideas. Agencies and clients were listing how they could better work together now they'd partnered. This might seem simple, but having gone to quite a few industry events where there's often a focus on show pieces, this is really refreshing. We need traction across local government, third sector and commissioning scenarios The above points aren't always true across all of the named fields. There are some fantastic examples out there and guys like Bexley Council are doing some good work but it would be good to hear more from other Local Authorities about what they're doing and see them take part. I know from our work, that sometimes it is a struggle to communicate the value of service design to Local Authorities, particularly when there seems to be a disconnect in terms of a common language or mindset. The barriers to making this happen are often political and complex. Conflicting drivers impact on commissioners, such as moves towards provider market places and citizens being considered as more demanding consumers of services (i.e to get your passport, you can apply to one place and one place only). There is a huge job to do here and a large systems piece... The larger systems piece to consider around design  The public office, and others, picked up on Systems thinking which is taking a role in this, particularly around the local authority service design discussion. In the complex environment of multi-stakeholder delivery, we really need to take a systems approach to consider how we commission services in this arena. This will involve up-skilling Councils to think differently about service delivery and information provision, and move away from the big 'I.T transformation programmes'. We need more of a conversation around the ethics and practice of codesign and research  I can't enthuse enough about the brilliant work of Katherine Garzonis on desinging with mental health service users and Liana Dragoman / Yasmin Fodal on the complexities of designing with and for vulnerable populations. Both brought nuances in how we should approach research, retelling the journeys of people and how we characterise their stories. We've got much work to do here in creating some accessible ethics and training across education on this. We are at another exciting period of development but the job is bigger than we expected There's lot to do, and I think we've got a serious skills gap. It seems nearly every public body and government department is advertising for people to come and work on this. We really need to scale up our training and experience in doing this kind of work. For me – I'm committed to an 'outsider' role after being on the inside of public services. I believe I have more impact from this position, supporting organisations to think differently about what they're doing and building their capacity to do it themselves. And this is something we have done and continue to do. We're talking more and more about supporting organisations to build design capacity rather than doing the design work ourselves; and this has always been the ethos of our agency. However, there's a role for everyone here: from outsiders to insiders in government and public services. We need to keep working together and sharing our insights and stories. Thanks Service Design in Government! I genuinely left this year feeling powered up and positive. We've got a long way to go but we're certainly heading in the right direction.
[post_title] => Service Design in Government | Designing Social Investment [post_excerpt] => Thanks Service Design in Government! I genuinely left this year feeling powered up and positive. We've got a long way to go but we're certainly heading in the right direction. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sdingov-2016 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=11050 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [45] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9154 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2015-11-09 12:24:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-11-09 12:24:22 [post_content] => As part of Architecture & Design Scotland's DECADE – a series of talks on architecture and design celebrating their 10th year – Keira, alongside Dr James White, lecturer in Urban Design at Glasgow University and Cathy McCulloch of Children's Parliament, presented and delivered a workshop for their "Participate" event. The following copy appears in the publication which will serve as the final output of the DECADE series. “Participation” carried out with honest intentions and appropriate resource, can generate a far more impactful and long lasting legacy than mere consultation. Co-production, co-design, collaboration – or any other “co” term you might wish to mention – used effectively and transparently, allows the end user to play a significant role in the design of their environment. Thus, solutions answer the needs of their intended audience. Additionally, the process builds trust and understanding between decision makers and the public. Ultimately this will ensure the long term success and viability of any project. Great in principle – but there are some pitfalls to avoid and barriers to be overcome. Here are four points to consider: 1) Who? Consider the stakeholders – intended users, the wider community, professional staff,  decision makers etc. Engaging a broad range of individuals from these groups can prove tricky; frustrating even. Participation is a process which asks an investment of personal time and energy. We designers need to reduce barriers to a minimum. Take the work to potential participants. Offer the chance to engage at a variety of levels. Day long workshops, one off encounters, multiple times, digitally, face to face, by post, in public and private spaces, remotely etc. We must seek involvement from the unusual suspects – not just the loudest voices. We must be confident that the insights and opportunities we are identifying do more than scratch the surface. Go beyond listening to voices – support users and providers to show you how issues might be overcome. Use this opportunity to build a supportive community around your project for the long-term. 2) Why? Why are you engaging people? What is their role? How can this impact on outcomes? Give a clear purpose for involvement. Establish this in participants minds before engagement and reiterate throughout. We should aim to be transparent about goals and processes. Participants must see that they are a vital and active piece of the puzzle. In addition – are there skills they will develop through working with you? How can you highlight and support this? 3) How? Design is an evolutionary process. Co-production can not be achieved through a solitary workshop or event. Exercises which ask communities to approve decisions already taken are manipulative. It is not enough to engage communities only as research. Instead, lead participants through the full design process allowing them to contribute to it. We must do more than placate users and clients alike. Look beyond providing a platform for complaints. Create an atmosphere which draws on assets, allowing ideas to be born and flourish. 4) And then? You engaged a wide range of participants. They were respected as experts in their own right and actively led through a design process. But what will happen next? When? What barriers stand in the way of a particular idea? Set clear expectations for your participants. They must see the bigger picture, see why certain decisions are taken or why their ideas might not appear as part of the final outcome. Without this follow-up you will create a disengaged, disenfranchised audience who wont be so quick or willing to participate again. Participative processes are labour intensive, time consuming, resource heavy and expensive. Why subject yourself, your colleagues, your clients to this? Carried out with respect for participants, honestly, with a clear strategy for outcomes and further actions – co-production delivers more than just a comprehensive solution which meets the needs of your users. Users will understand, respect and be invested in the process you undertook to develop your outcome together. The community of participants built around your project and the extended community surrounding them will also take ownership of and embrace the final outcome far into the future. In the long-term, nothing can be more cost-effective than that. [post_title] => Participatory design: who, why, how? [post_excerpt] => “Participation” carried out with honest intentions and appropriate resource, can generate a far more impactful and long lasting legacy than [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => start-participatory-design [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=9154 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [46] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9118 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2015-09-25 12:03:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-09-25 12:03:38 [post_content] => I’m off to Better World By Design this year, for the second time in Providence, Rhode Island. I have to say, after my visit two years ago it was one of the best conferences I've ever been to.  Not just because it is split between the splendour of Brown University’s Campus and Rhode Island School of Design’s building but the way it is run, the content and most importantly the people. In 2013 I had the pleasure of being welcome by Isobel Whitney and this year Cole Moore has been looking after me over Skype sessions. Put together by students, they go the extra mile to make you feel welcome and ensure as a speaker you are well prepared to fit the agenda they are pursuing.  I really appreciate this as a speaker when the effort is made to go through the theme, the focus and intended impact of the event. I’ve no idea what’s in store this year but last year I had the pleasure of meeting retired soldiers working with Whole Foods, take part in a Hip Hop Design class and explore new technologies for crafting 3D products. I’m also impressed with their efforts to make this as sustainable an effort as possible.  Everyone is provided with reusable cutlery, we bring our own water bottles and they encourage using bikes to get around. They are using People’s Power & Light (PP&L)’s New England Wind program to power the event, offering the opportunity to offset your carbon footprint and working with a local student initiative to compost on site. These details are tough to remember when organising a conference of this scale over three days with multiple venues.  I take my hat off to the organising committee of 2015. You guys rock. So this year we’re focusing on democracy and design and the theme of access.  I’ll be talking alongside Frog Design and MOMA (NYC) on citizen participation and how design can play a role in civic life. I want to talk about the importance of surfacing creativity in all of us and providing these opportunities in our communities and civic landscape. In 2013 I closed the conference talking about the ‘concept’ of Dearest Scotland and how we were seeking to pursue our wee project of citizen letters to the future.  This year I return with the draft copy of the book to share with friends from the event, it feels like a real achievement of Lauren, Cat and I to bring this into fruition and a reminder for me that it’s good to share ideas with others,there’s something quite beautifully nerve wracking saying in front of an audience that you’re going to do something.  It holds you to account and makes your thoughts real. I also get to catch up with Andy Cutler, our magical over seas friend who keeps us smiling with his support from across the pond for Snook and Dearest Scotland.  I can’t wait to meet you again and share a beer - check out Andy’s Smarter Cities Unite, I feel like Providence and Glasgow have a unique connection because of him. If you’re interested in this diverse conference keep up with it this weekend on twitter at #BWxD15 [post_title] => Better World By Design [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => better-world-by-design [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=9118 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [47] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9102 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2015-09-12 11:53:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-09-12 11:53:53 [post_content] => Our Sarah is the Service Design Industry Associate for the Cultural Enterprise Office. The Industry Associates are the extended family of the Cultural Enterprise Office. They share their knowledge and represent the full spectrum of the creative industries and a cross-section of business areas. If you are:
  1. A business is based in Scotland
  2. Working within the following creative industry sectors: advertising, animation, architecture, crafts, dance, design, fashion, film, games, literature, music, photography, publishing, radio, software & apps, theatre, TV and visual arts
  3. Not currently in full-time further or higher education
  4. Over the age of 16
  5. A business with fewer than 10 people and an annual turnover less than £1.6 million,

you can get plenty of advice and support through free, sector-specific sessions. Get in touch with the Business Support team.
[post_title] => Service design industry associate [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => service-design-industry-associate [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=9102 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [48] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9090 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2015-09-09 11:44:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-09-09 11:44:47 [post_content] => unnamed-2unnamed-1unnamedunnamed-5 Last night Emma from Snook spent an evening with a lovely bunch of aspiring service designers from Central St Martins summer short course. STBY kindly hosted an informal chat where we were able to talk through a few current projects, chat 'personal career journeys' and introduce The Interchange. There was a lot of interest and excitement about our initiative and many an impassioned debate over a beer afterwards around how to approach community engagement. Watch this space! [post_title] => An evening with aspiring designers [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => an-evening-with-aspiring-designers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=9090 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [49] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9075 [post_author] => 21 [post_date] => 2015-08-26 10:46:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-08-26 10:46:18 [post_content] =>
Snook is currently working from The Interchange on an innovation project project exploring how digital technology can help support young people in care. The Codesigning Care project, funded by the DfE is the first of it's kind in the UK and Snook are excited to be involved.
Snook are currently about a third of the way through the project and are now at the point of defining opportunity areas. During the next month we will be working side by side with young people to explore and develop concepts for their new digital service.
[post_title] => Codesigning Care [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => codesigning-care-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=9075 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [50] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8262 [post_author] => 20 [post_date] => 2015-07-20 11:43:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-07-20 11:43:18 [post_content] => I was invited by Matt Dexter from Sheffield Hallam University to lead a team as part of the 24 hour Design Challenge at the 2015 Design4Health conference, organised by Matt and led by Julia Cassim of Kyoto Design Lab. THE TEAM The group who had applied to be part of the design challenge were divided into 3 teams. Our team consisted of three industrial designers, two visual designers and two service designers. The focus of this year’s challenge was Parkinson’s Disease and the organisers had arranged for each team to have input and support from people with lived experience of Parkinson’s. Our team had Ali and his wife Jane, who both have Parkinson’s, and Clare, a Parkinson’s nurse. Ali has had Parkinson’s for ten years now so we began by asking him about his life and everyday experiences, and what the biggest challenges were that he faced on a daily basis. THE CHALLENGE While providing us with valuable insights into the lived experience of Parkinson’s, Ali said:
“The biggest challenge is freezing – it is public and embarrassing and a huge, huge emotional thing.”
The Parkinson’s Society explains that
“Freezing is when someone stops suddenly while walking. It can also happen during a repetitive movement, such as cleaning teeth or writing. People with Parkinson's have said that freezing is like having your feet glued to the ground. Episodes of freezing can last for several seconds or minutes.”
Read more here. Ali, Jane and Clare all said that freezing was the most intractable problem associated with Parkinson’s and that many approaches had been tried to enable people experiencing this to get ‘unstuck’ and break the freeze. Current solutions include the use of metronomes, chants or mantras to help people relax and reset their mental state through a calming or set rhythm. Ali said that he would value,
“Anything that allows you to regain control – allows you to rebalance, relax and breathe.”
FINDING A SOLUTION The design team took the detailed information about daily experiences gained from our discussions with Ali, Jane and Clare and developed some themes including, sensory stimulation; environmental cues and crowd sourced data; medication administration and monitoring; and education and simulation. We explored the four themes, brainstorming ideas associated with each, then identified two to explore in more depth. Following a discussion with Ali, Jane and Clare, we decided to focus on developing something that would helps unfreeze through prompting relaxation by setting rhythm and pulse via multi-sensory input through: a)   replicating the feeling of someone gently squeezing your wrist in a rhythmic and reassuring way; b)   playing a personalised playlist or tone linked to an underlying metronome set at your preferred rhythm. THE PROTOTYPE The industrial designers in the team worked very hard through the night to create detailed CAD models of what the device would look like (including 3-D printing a hard copy prototype) and also to mock up a rough, working prototype. The visual designers then took the images and worked with the service designers to mock up some screen shots of what a supporting app would look like. We demonstrated the prototypes and mock ups to Ali, Jane and Clare in the morning and Ali was delighted with the proposed solution, asking,
“Can I have a working version to take with me on my journey home tomorrow?”
WINNING PEOPLE'S CHOICE AWARD Having been involved in a few of these hack type events, it is always amazing to see how ideas can be developed into quite detailed prototypes in 24 hours with the right attitude and the right team. The team for this event were certainly the best I have worked with, including staff and students from Sheffield Hallam, and designers from Waag Society and uscreates. We presented our design concept to a large audience of attendees at the Design4Health conference who voted us winners of the People’s Choice award. The team are so enthusiastic about the idea that we are now looking to work with Sheffield Hallam to apply for funding to develop the concept further. [post_title] => Design4Health 24 hour Challenge [post_excerpt] => Design4Health is a biennial conference that brings together designers and creative practitioners with researchers, clinicians, policy makers and users to discuss, disseminate and test their approaches and methods. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => design4health-24-hour-challenge [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=8262 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [51] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8166 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2015-07-09 13:27:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-07-09 13:27:37 [post_content] => Don't see yourself as a designer? Let our Sarah inspire you to think otherwise. In this TEDxPortobello video, she talks about working at Snook and the Dearest Scotland and CycleHack projects. [post_title] => From Wow Design to We Design | TEDxPorty [post_excerpt] => Don't see yourself as a designer? Let our Sarah Drummond inspire you to think otherwise. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => from-wow-design-to-we-design-tedxporty [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=8166 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [52] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8152 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2015-07-04 12:24:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-07-04 12:24:39 [post_content] => Are you wondering what design means to different sectors of society and how we are applying the process to engage citizens in the design of the future? Then join us this Saturday, 11th July, on a journey of the principles of design and how they are being applied to a wide range of sectors – from Smart Cities and Governments to high street bakeries. The speakers list includes: - Keira Anderson - Includem - Becca Thomas - Pidgin Perfect - Valerie Carr - Snook - Catrina Cochrane - Dearest Scotland - Michael Hayes - Rookie Oven - Neil McGuire - Glasgow School of Art - Karen Anderson - Architecture and Design Scotland - Trevor Lakey - NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde
We have a really exciting and diverse range of creative businesses and makers here doing incredibly innovative and ground-breaking work, some of which is world-renowned, and this is a chance to come and meet these people and see what they’re doing, as well as take part in some unusual and fun activities and workshops and enjoy some food and drink.

Helen Teeling, TAKTAL via STV Glasgow

Tickets cost £6/£4 concession and are available here. Society by Design Pecha Kucha The Pecha Kucha night is curated by our Sarah Drummond and produced by TAKTAL. It is part of the Whisky Bond's summer party – an open day for the public to meet the makers, creatives and designers based there. [post_title] => 'Society by Design' Pecha Kucha Night [post_excerpt] => Join us on a journey of the principles of design and how they are being applied to a wide range of sectors | Saturday 11th July, 7-9pm at the Whisky Bond [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => society-by-design-pecha-kucha-night [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=8152 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [53] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7996 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2015-06-25 16:39:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-06-25 16:39:45 [post_content] => Between May 2014 and May 2015, I was fortunate to be Snook’s embedded designer within young people’s charity Includem. Their one-to-one support model helps young people in creating and sustaining positive changes so that they lead happy and healthy lives. The Transitional Support Service takes young people through the transition from Child Services to adult life. Includem asked Snook to help them develop the future of this service. The first half of the project put forward recommendations; some of which were developed in this subsequent phase. Since January, I have worked closely with 3 Transitional Support Service young people from both Glasgow and Fife, and their workers. Two of them chose to look at the wider recognition and understanding of Transitional Support, whilst the third focused on ways in which Includem could and should support young people to participate more widely and more often in Includem’s service development and delivery. Together, we have developed a series of tools and publications which workers can use with young people and other professionals in communicating Includem’s work. We also developed a framework which Includem will consider whenever an opportunity arises for young people to become involved in projects. I was inspired by the way young people engaged with the work. I will be taking many of the “Principles for Participation” which we developed with me in further work with Snook. Process10 Of particular importance amongst these principles was this question; how does participation benefit the participant? I sometimes feel user participation projects sometimes forget this question. Repeated exposure to projects with no visible or tangible benefit to the individuals asked to take part can lead to participant-fatigue or over-consultation. With no real sense of ownership in a piece of work, individuals involved can find themselves giving “expected answers” or agreeing with and approving ideas and solutions already proposed by the organisation. Participation To address this within our own project (for Snook and Includem were, of course, asking three young people to donate their time, experiences and expertise as participants) we undertook a number of measures. As well as prototyping how young people might be involved specifically in Includem recruitment going forward, I made it a priority to continually consider what direct benefit the young people I worked with might experience at each stage of our own project. At the end of the project - after co-presenting the work to Includem’s staff - I sat down with young people and we talked about the work they had taken part in. I asked for honest feedback on the process, so that both Snook and Includem might learn from this in future work, and to give me feedback on what skills over the course of the project. I prepared a book for each participant which reviewed our process, tools and methods as well as the skills they had used along the way. Included in this I gave some examples of how these skills and processes might be used again in the future. We spent some time reviewing all we had achieved and how we had come so far. One young person requested that I prepare “challenge postcards” for all staff, to be distributed at our final presentations. Staff were asked to make a promise or commitment to carry on the work in some way or adopt elements of it into their own practise. These signed postcards are now displayed publicly in Includem’s offices. Includem have committed not only to take forward and develop our recommendations and prototypes, but to keep the young people who worked on them involved and abreast of any developments. If projects are unable to move forward, or halted, they will be informed of the reasons for this. Only with this accountability can we say that participation has been meaningful. Finally, I was delighted to write references for those involved throughout and I wish them the best of luck in all future endeavours. Recognition A special mention must go to the workers who not only supported these three young people throughout the project, but also made the most incredible contributions of their own. And I must thank all those workers and staff throughout Includem who made me feel a part of their organisation and all the friends I made amongst them. A single blog post isn’t really enough to do justice to the hard work and commitment demonstrated by the young people and staff engaged at Includem over the past year. I am truly in admiration of this organisation and the young people they support; not only do they do incredible, often difficult, impactful and important work - they also demonstrated that they are not afraid to shake up their practice and adopt new, innovative, initially scary methods and projects. A truly progressive, brave and impactful organisation of staff and young people alike - many others could learn a thing or two from them - I certainly did. [post_title] => Charity, Now Including Design [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => charity-now-including-design [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:09:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:09:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7996 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [54] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7854 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2015-06-23 11:23:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-06-23 11:23:51 [post_content] => Following last year’s success with RITA, our innovation consortium has recently reformed after receiving funding from the Department for Education to explore digital innovation with young people in care. We are excited to be reunited with The University of Portsmouth, Centre for Creative Technologies; Affective State; and University of Kent, Centre for Child Protection to work together to deliver this innovative project. Codesigning Care will explore how technology can support young people in care to stay safe; recognise and manage their emotions and behaviour; and communicate more effectively with carers. The project will take a co-design approach and we will work side by side with young people and carers to design a service that works for them. Snook worked on developing the brand and we started our first round of engagement with young people this week. On Saturday, we held a brilliant workshop with 9 young people in Westminster. Together, we explored how they currently use technology and what their experiences have been to date moving through the care system. The young people were stars; really engaging and providing a great foundation of insights into opportunities for change that we will build on as we move through the Discovery phase of the project. [caption id="attachment_7856" align="alignnone" width="300"]Codesigning Care badges & booklets Codesigning Care badges & booklets.[/caption]   [caption id="attachment_7857" align="alignnone" width="224"]Codesigning Care technology A selection of technology to play with at the first Codesigning Care workshop.[/caption]   We will be engaging a range of young people and carers in this process via the use of creative and interactive co-design methods. The project will explore six key themes with a view to understanding what these themes mean to young people in care and how technology can help support them in these areas: communication, companionship, advocacy, coaching, supervision, and capturing (thoughts & emotions). [caption id="attachment_7892" align="alignnone" width="300"]Codesigning care workshop Codesigning care first workshop.[/caption]   The initial stage of Codesigning Care will run until March 2016 by which time we aim to have a limited functional prototype of our digital service. During this time, we will be keeping a blog on the Codesigning Care website and sharing our experience on Twitter and via our hashtag #codesigningcare. [post_title] => Codesigning Care [post_excerpt] => Following last year’s success with RITA, our innovation consortium has recently reformed after receiving funding from the Department for Education to explore digital innovation with young people in care. We are excited to be reunited with The University of Portsmouth [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => codesigning-care [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7854 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [55] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7841 [post_author] => 14 [post_date] => 2015-06-03 16:24:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-06-03 16:24:01 [post_content] => CycleHack is a side project created by our founder and director, Sarah Drummond, alongside Johanna Holtan and Matthew Lowell. It began in late 2013 and this year, on 19-21 June, cities in 30 countries will be hacking barriers to cycling worldwide. As the event organisers are busily preparing for the hacking weekend, we're extremely happy to announce that CycleHack just won a Core77 Design Awards for Social Impact. John Thackara, Director of The Doors of Perception, who was one of the judges said about Cyclehack:

Brings people together in their city to generate practical solutions to the barriers that otherwise stop or inhibit people from cycling. It gives citizens the tools to propose their own proactive, DIY, solutions.

The platform enables a grassroots approach to innovation. It taps into a huge reservoir of latent social energy. Bottom line, we can see it making a real difference where a real difference needs to be made.

To find out more about Core77, head to their website. [post_title] => Cyclehack wins Core77 Design award for Social Impact [post_excerpt] => We're extremely happy to announce that CycleHack just won a Core77 Design Awards for Social Impact. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => cyclehack-wins-core77-design-award-for-social-impact [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7841 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [56] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7028 [post_author] => 29 [post_date] => 2014-10-21 21:20:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-10-21 21:20:39 [post_content] => I'm just back from Sweden after attending the annual Service Design network Conference, which was bigger than ever with over 600 participants in attendance. I've had a two year hiatus from the conference due to various projects so I was looking forward to finding out how the landscape for the discipline had changed.  In those two years ago since, there have been initial discussions moving from the rudiments of the practice and toolkits into designers entering the hearts of businesses and making change from within. There are a whole host of internalised learnings I've taken from the various presentations and conversations; too many to articulate without it turning into a lengthy thesis on the Service Design landscape. So below I've picked my memorable moments, favourite tweets and overall insights which deserve a good sharing. Experio Labs  
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Experiencing having a tremor and filling in forms #sdgc14

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  Experio Labs are a national center for patient-centered service innovation. They focus on involving staff, patients and families to work together on health care services that create value in peoples' everyday lives. Their innovations come top of my list as they created an experience for conference attendees to try out various health conditions from tinitus to visual impairments in a hands-on workshop. This was then brought together particularly well by a Swedish nurse they had worked with who admitted to changing her practice after being treated as a patient for a day.  Her shock at the impact of using empathy tools to see the patient experience from their perspective was heart warming and fantastic, particularly since she hadn't been keen to take part in the first instance.  What I took from this was that by understanding other peoples' experiences, quite literally, even small changes can make a large impact.  The same nurse started spending a few more minutes with people when they arrived on her ward, touching people on the arm, creating a connection. Small changes to her service delivery made a longer term impact on a patient's stay. Oliver King | Analysing Organisation capacity for change Oliver King of Engine ran a talk which I would have liked to have seen more detail on, unfortunately his presentation was shorter than it deserved.  He presented frameworks that Engine use to analyse how ready organisations are for various Service Design interventions at a series of levels, from understanding the customer journey to scaled up business change processes. By taking a sample of staff perception on the service they offer to customer insight and posting this to their matrix, they can understand how well the organisation understands their customers - if they know what they need to change.  This helps the consultancy to work to support self assessment of the organisation and create well formed statements for change.  This ultimately makes both their work, and the organisation's relationship with Service Design processes more fruitful from the offset. Macmillan Cancer Care Marianne and Christina from Macmillan Cancer care talked about embedding new processes based on Service Design and utilising the double diamond model inside Macmillan Cancer Care. It's great to see work like this taking shape and becoming far more common in the industry.  They've began to set up more visual tools and practice inside the offices, supporting teams in co-design practice and thinking more holistically while initiating new design led projects inside their agency.  I'm looking forward to seeing how their work develops, as I have a particular interest in embedded design teams which support the development of strategy and services in large organisations.   Screenshot 2014-10-16 23.53.50 Service Design Pioneers We were invited to take part in a special lunch inside Stockholm City Hall, hosting the pioneers who have been working in the industry for over 10 years, with many of our peers and close friends.  This was a real chance to say thank you to the network for inviting us. We've dedicated the last five years of Snook to doing the best work we can and sharing our learnings as much as possible along the journey.   Low Chaew Hwei, Philips
‘The burden on professionals is too large to look after individual health care.  We will rely on technology to support ourselves’  - Low Chaew Hwei
Low Chaew Hwei from Philips Healthcare shared many lessons from the company's work on integrated health and care services.  Low's focus laid on how healthcare is moving from professional care to a focus on consumer healthcare, which is where we should be designing products, services and systems to reduce the burden on professionals.
‘In order to do good healthcare (#servicedesign) we need to understand emotion versus motivation’
  Lavrans Lovlie, Live|Work
@lavranslovlie ‘Sometimes I can be sceptical about design principles but they can be great as we can manage by them’ #SDGC14#servicedesign

Lavrans Lovlie, Service Design pioneer and founder of Live|Work delivered a beautiful presentation on signs and services in Nordic countries.  What struck with me was his description of their use of Design principles over the delivery of Service Blueprints, articulating how a new service design operates.  I have also been an admirer of the power of design principles that can be delivered with an organisation to support the mindset and thinking behind the service delivery over a long period of time.  They act as guiding principles not only for delivery but future developments of an organisation's delivery.  I now think of them as sustainable deliverables built within an organisation and their customers.

Index Award

What we need is the design of large scale coherent systems says @indexaward#SDGC14

Index Award, Design to improve life delivered a presentation on some of their innovation work in product and service design within the social design landscape.  What hit me was their emphasis on designing systems of things, and a need to focus our energy on designing the integrated platforms that will scale our designs for better quality of life.  I believe this was a message to move beyond simple 'solutionism' which I recently wrote about for Project 99 and the Design Management Institute.

Air Bnb

I can't imagine what it's like to stand up in front of an audience and have about 30-40% of them raise their hand and say the are using your service.  Mark Levy, head of employee experience at Air BnB shared the history of the company and some fascinating insights into how they support their staff to feel like an integral part of the business.  My favourite insight was on hearing that the meals served up at the HQ are inspired around an Airbnb listing, which brings their service delivery into the hands of their employees.  A great company operating a service that, funnily enough,  I used when staying in Stockholm.

All in all - this was good conference experience and bigger than ever before.  I would have liked some more in-depth insights and practice reflections from the Service Design pioneers but you can't have everything so they say.

Much thanks and props to Very Day and Doberman for hosting and I have found my new favourite facilitator, Lisa Lindstrom who can make any large conference feel like an intimate living room conversation.

Here's to next year.

[post_title] => Service Design Network Conference | Stockholm [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => service-design-network-conference-stockholm [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7028 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [57] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7046 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2014-10-21 18:00:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-10-21 18:00:41 [post_content] => So - we keep busy with side projects, some which spiral into global movements.  One of them has been shortlisted for a Design Impact award at the Lighthouse and we thought we'd share the news here.  The awards night is this Thursday and we're amongst many of our fellow Glasgow peers who have done some brilliant work from Beyond the Finish Line to the Commonwealth queen's baton and the graphics for the games. CycleHack is the nominated project.  I'm on a mission with two other partners in crime Johanna Holtan and Matthew Lowell to make the world more sustainable through reducing the barriers to cycling. This year we ran our first CycleHack, where a group of people with different skills sets from design to urban planning came together in Glasgow to discuss barriers to cycling and prototype ideas to solve them.  Except, at the same time we ran it in Melbourne and Beirut too. Next year over 35 cities have signed up to run it from Bangalore to Vancouver, Cape Town to Mexico City and further afield and we've been featured on the BBC Worldwide service going out to 360 million people across the globe. Penny In Yo Pants from Johanna Holtan on Vimeo. One hack, called Penny in Your Pants, a life fix for ladies on bikes and skirts gained over 3.2 million hits online and is now being taken to market by Alec Farmer, Madelaine Wilson and Johanna Holtan. I believe CycleHack is a true opportunity to tool citizens up to work with their local authority to consider how to make places more cycle friendly and really bridge the gap for co-producing ideas together.  And, well, we can now say it's a bit of a global movement. For more information you can download our info sheet or see below. cyclehack_infosheet cyclehack_infosheet2 [post_title] => CycleHack up for Design Impact Award [post_excerpt] => CycleHack has been shortlisted for a Design Impact award at the Lighthouse and we thought we'd share the news here. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => cyclehack-up-for-design-impact-award [to_ping] => [pinged] => http://vimeo.com/98808131 [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7046 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [58] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7009 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2014-09-22 14:20:13 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-09-22 14:20:13 [post_content] => Nearly three years ago now, our friend Rohan Gunatillake wrote a blog post around how Service Design is the next big thing in cultural innovation.  It's a poignant and still very relevant article today given what we're working on now. Andy and Alex have been developing Know How, a programme designed to take organisations in the East Midland’s arts, cultural and heritage sector on a journey placing design and digital thinking at the heart of what they do. The programme is in partnership with Broadway, based in Nottingham and is part of their larger Near Now programme. I asked Alex to give us the low down on what they've been up to over the past 4 months. We have developed a supportive and structured process to be delivered over a six month period.  We aim to encourage organisations to conceive new ideas enabled by digital tech, assisting in bringing them to life and exploring their potential, before refining the ideas through prototyping. This project is part funded by the European Regional Development Fund 2007 to 2013 and supported using public funding by Arts Council England, with additional support contributed by regional universities. 940x460_Solid There are six stages to Know How: Think, Develop, Play, Test, Build and Launch.  There will be two cohorts; the first programme began in June 2014 consisting of 16 organisations, and the second is due to begin in January 2015. Eight organisations will advance to the Build stage, where they will pitch their concept to the People’s Panel to access grants of up to £5000 to progress their project further. Over two days in June, the organisations came together to discuss and discover innovative ways to incorporate digital tech within their organisations. In order to do this, participants were asked to consider the challenges faced by the sector, their ambitions and also their target audience. We provided tools for idea generation, Gillian Easson gave a fantastic keynote presentation and the event culminated in a wide array of fascinating concepts to be developed further during July/August. With the next module Play on our doorstep, we have been busy arranging more tools and techniques to help our organisations to develop their concepts further and place them in a strong position to apply for the Build process. What’s more exciting is the variety of technology that will be available for them to get their hands on; from littleBits to a GoPano, from Makey Makey to Sugru… We’re hoping to have a range of tech experts on hand to give guidance, and there will be another inspirational keynote presentation, this time from Ben Templeton.  We're excited through playing with various elements of tech to see our cohort get their heads in the digital thinking space and transfer some of this informal learning into their own projects. Pic_3 We have been blown away by the enthusiasm and open-mindedness of the participants and are extremely excited for the PLAY/TEST event, let alone the potential future of a number of these projects and in-house developments. We’ll keep you posted, but one thing is for sure – over the next year, the East Midlands arts, cultural and heritage sector is one to watch. Keep your eyes on our project site where we'll be uploading content, talks and our organisation's progress over the next 3 months. [post_title] => Know How - Putting digital and design thinking at the heart of organisations [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => know-how-putting-digital-and-design-thinking-at-the-heart-of-organisations [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=7009 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [59] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6988 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2014-09-08 15:14:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-09-08 15:14:53 [post_content] => At Snook a core strand of our work for the past several years has been within the health and social care sector.  Valerie Carr, our senior designer is currently hard at work on a variety of healthcare projects ranging from technological innovations to service evaluation in cancer support services. RITA_Logo_Colour_web_transparent-02 RITA (Responsive Interactive Advocate) is a project funded by Innovate UK (formerly the Technology Strategy Board) where Snook are one of the partners in a consortium led by University of Kent. The other partners are University of Portsmouth, Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries, and Affective State. Full details of the partners and the thinking behind the project can be found at www.rita.me.uk. Basically the project aim is to develop a comprehensive digital support system, complementing and supplementing other care systems, and fronted by an interactive avatar, making interactions much more intuitive and natural. This project was funded for nine months up to end September and we are currently looking to access further funding, from Innovate UK and other potential funders, to take it forward to the next stage. In nine months we have developed a proof of concept and a few scripted demos of what RITA might look and feel like in action.  Snook's work in this project has focused on the user engagement, the branding and website and the development of the scripts for the demos. Macmillan Service Evaluation. We have been working on an evaluation of the Macmillan at Glasgow Libraries Service for the past year and a half with Social Value Lab. Snook’s contribution has been mainly focused on understanding the service user experience, and we have had creative conversations with service users in many of the libraries across the city. Social Value Lab are currently preparing the final report for this evaluation to feed back to Macmillan. Coventry Early Action Neighbourhood Fund. We are currently working on a bid with Coventry Law Centre and Grapevine Coventry for the Early Action funders Alliance. Coventry are down to the last five in an open bidding process where three local authorities will be funded for five years (sums of up to £2 million) to redesign local services to provide early intervention and support to their communities. We are being funded to develop the proposal which is to be submitted early November, with decisions made by end November. Snook will be developing some branding for the proposal and will be working with CLC and Grapevine to develop a strong service redesign framework for the project proposal. If the proposal is successful we will be heavily involved in the user engagement and service design aspects of the project. To talk about how our design process can support innovation in health services and products contact valerie [at] wearesnook.com [post_title] => Design for health [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => design-for-health [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=6988 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [60] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6973 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2014-09-04 23:48:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-09-04 23:48:39 [post_content] => We're just back from the dmi: 19th Academic Design Management Conference where our paper on Project 99 was accepted, 'Moving Beyond the Consultancy Model'. It was a real honor to attend and present at DMI.  For Snook, as practioners, it was an interesting experience to be surrounded by so many academic theories and papers looking at the development of design and the advent of design thinking as a method organisations and individuals are adopting to cope with a world in constant flux. The conference gave us the opportunity to reflect on our wide practice in Scotland where we're developing outside ventures, consulting on the edge with organisations and embedding our team into charities and governments, we're taking a tiered approach to consider how design can fluctuate from straight up idea generation and development of concepts to quite complex entrepreneurial forms of design management and strategy.  For Snook, we are seeing our designers use their rounded skills of prototyping, visualisation, story telling to develop strategy and vision for organisations over and above the development of products and services. Some of the presenters at DMI provided us with evidenced conceptual models to look at how our work can be categorised and communicated succinctly even though some of it can be messy and disruptive, never really following a linear business process. We've always been a fan of writing up our work, the thing is, when you run a business and are out delivering work, the time to write, particularly in a critical or academic fashion does not come along often. Our paper revolved around our experience of being the design partner on Project 99, and reflected on a new form of consultancy where as a design agency we're getting further involved in the early stage framing of issues and exploration of user needs to inform new work streams or project initiation documents.  For my presentation, we focused more on telling the story of how we explored internet based approaches to support youth mental health in Glasgow with Young Scot and Mental Health Foundation  for NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, showcasing our approach to co-design and supporting young people to become designers themselves. We reflected on the new forms of tender coming out, in the case of Project 99, we were delighted to see an exploratory approach looking for co-production methods and collaborative work as opposed to the usual tender that already articulates the final solution. You can find our paper here on page 1629 (the paper only here) and our presentation of the paper above. A massive thank you to Valerie Carr and Dr Trevor Lakey who co-authored the paper with me and I'm looking forward to spending some time consolidating my thoughts from the variety of papers I saw presented from the conference. Thanks for having us DMI! [post_title] => Academic Design Management Conference [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => academic-design-management-conference [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=6973 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [61] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6895 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2014-08-14 11:00:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-08-14 11:00:05 [post_content] => Snook are currently working with Includem; a charity that does incredible work with young people who have often been excluded from, or find it hard to engage with, more mainstream services. With regular contacts with familiar workers, and a 24/7 helpline available – they provide a unique service of support. Their approach is flexible, personal and tireless. For six months, Snooker Keira will be acting as an “embedded” designer within Includem. She is working closely with the small and fearless Transitional Support Service Team. This squad of seven workers (three in Glasgow, three in Fife and one manager) work with young people aged between 14 and 26. The young people they engage are faced with a range of issues, whether that be pending convictions, drug or alcohol misuse, homelessness or mental health concerns.  At this age many young people struggle to find the support they need – as they often fall in the cracks between “child services” and “adult services”. Includem’s policy of “stickability” means that they never give up on a young person, ever. “We believe that no young person is beyond help” is the first principle Includem work to. In any given contact, Includem might help a young person with applications for education, employment or accommodation, take them to any other services they need to engage with, sometimes acting as an advocate on their behalf in meetings, or just check in with them to see how they are getting on, to help prevent crises from arising. The main aim of the Transitional Support Service is to help young people to move safely and successfully from “child services” to adult life. “They help rather than painting me as the bad guy” one young person told us this week. Another commented, “They don’t pressure me into doing stuff. They help me do it at my own pace. And they give me structure through the week, like with a job.” Includem have hired Snook to help them reflect on what they do brilliantly and where they might make their service even better in the future. They are a creative bunch and there are already a host of ideas bouncing around. Keira hopes to help shine a light on some of the best and make to develop them into tangible realities. As per the principles of both Includem and Snook, the young people who work with Includem are at the heart of this project. Having spent some time shadowing the Transitional Support workers during a variety of contacts, Keira has started working with Includem young people to help them share their stories and experiences of the service. As the experts in Includem’s services, it's vital that the young people involved see that their voices are valued and listened to. In the coming weeks Keira will continue to work alongside these young people, and others, to explore possible new or enhanced facets to the service, developing ideas together along the way. In October the young people who have participated in the project will have the chance to present their ideas to the staff of Includem at their annual conference, alongside a take away newspaper showing what they would like to see from the service in the coming years. Keira hopes to work with them to develop skills towards employability, confidence and self esteem throughout the project. Acting upon problems identified and solutions created by these young people will, with any luck, empower them and clearly show them that their actions and effort can make a real difference. In addition, the Transitional team and Keira will be undertaking a series of regular “Away Days”. Adapted from Snook Studio life, all usual work will be set aside for a day (unless a young person needs support from a worker).  During these sessions, the team will have a chance to develop their own ideas and to share their professional strengths and knowledge. We are excited to have the opportunity to work in partnership with and contribute to such a forward thinking service, which is so highly valued by many young people across Scotland.   [post_title] => Designing from the inside out: six months inside a charity [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 6-months-inside-a-charity [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=6895 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [62] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6821 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2014-06-03 16:13:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-06-03 16:13:03 [post_content] => Snook are delighted to be partnering with Broadway's Near Now to deliver a new programme called Know How for the cultural sector in the East Midlands. Many arts organisations across the UK are facing public funding cuts and at the same time are expected to continue to increase or sustain revenues, secure new sources of income, become resilient, reach new audiences, utilise new technologies and innovate. The Know How programme is designed to take cultural organisations on a journey that places design and digital thinking at the heart of what they do. Through the Know How process, we will support organisations to shape, refine and build a new offer enabled by digital technologies by connecting them with new ideas, tools and resources that leverage the know-how that already exists in their organisation.   The programme runs for six months and contains six core modules; think, develop, play, test, build and launch. Over these six months we will help organisations conceive new ideas, bring them to life and test their potential through prototypes before building and launching their concepts. The programme is an amalgamation of the shared expertise and experience from previous projects by Broadway, Near Now and Snook. The basic framework for the programme looks to build on existing events in the cultural landscape like Hack Days, Startup weekends, etc and use these models as inspiration to deliver a large programme that has sustainable impact for the companies involved and the wider sector across the East Midlands. Yesterday, Broadway opened its doors to the East Midlands cultural sector, universities, designers and developers and hosted a launch event to share the programme with those who have shown early interest. After an impressive lunch in Broadway’s Mezz Bar, we filtered into the 130-seater Screen 2 and kicked things off. Steve Mapp, Chief Executive of Broadway began by introducing the organisation and detailing examples of ongoing work through their Near Now and Projector programmes, including the Near Now Fellowship and a new £100,000 film fund for the development of feature-length fiction and documentary films intended for cinema release.   To add to their abundance of ongoing work, Steve also announced that Broadway will soon undergo development work to create a number of new spaces to support their expanding range of programmes including a studio, an art, design and technology workshop, a library and a street facing retail unit all contained within the lower ground floor. Having outlined Broadways ambitions and plans for the near future, Sarah followed Steve’s presentation with a bit about Snook, what Design + Digital looks like in the Cultural Sector, some case studies of great projects like Capture The Museum and an overview of the Know How Programme. Some of the slides below give a flavour to what we presented.     I’ve been fortunate enough to work on some outstanding projects in the cultural sector over the last few years including Festivals Design DNA, Geeks-In-Residence and Culture Shift. I recently wrote a piece for the Sync Tank on what I learned during my time as a geek and these learning’s are reflected in how this programme has taken shape. This is an exciting time for the East Midlands Cultural Sector and those interested in design and digital in this space. With opportunities for collaboration through funded placements, linking in with HEI’s and designer/developer teams, plus a pot of funding at the end of the process, Know How and it’s participants have the chance to create some tangible and sustainable impact in the sector. The first cohort of 20 organisations join us on this adventure from mid-July, with applications being accepted through the Know How website.  The deadline is June 20th, so if you’re thinking about getting involved or know someone that might be, then best get in quick. Missed the event? Check out the Storify here. Who’s behind Know How? Check us out below. Got more questions, interested or want to find out more? Visit the Near Now website here, drop me a line or tweet me @_andyyoung. One final ask, we’re trying to curate a list of the best design and digital work in the cultural sector. If you know of any projects, or people doing awesome work then tweet us at #KnowHow14 with examples. Stay tuned, there is plenty more to come. (Feature image courtesy of Ashley Bird) [post_title] => Know How || Design & Digital Thinking in the Cultural Sector [post_excerpt] => We are delighted to be partnering with Broadway's Near Now to deliver a new programme called Know How for the cultural sector. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => know-how-design-digital-thinking-in-the-cultural-sector [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=6821 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [63] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6803 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2014-04-28 06:13:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-04-28 06:13:49 [post_content] => We've been giving the job of Keynoting at Service Design in Government.  I'll be there on 19th May to talk about designing inside, outside and on the fringe of government and public services to share lessons on what it's like from all angles. We've had experience in setting up ventures from outside, embedding design on the inside and taking on the consultant role to give direction on Services and customer experience. Really honoured to be given this position to kick off the conference and hoping to lay down some angles for discussion over the two days.  Service Design is growing up, but where will it go next to be taken seriously by governments as integral to everyday practice and board meetings? We're in good company with other  speakers including the guys from Goverment Digital Services, Capita and Futuregov. If you don't have a ticket, I'd recommend picking one up. http://govservicedesign.net/ [post_title] => Service Design in Government [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => service-design-in-government [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=6803 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [64] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6795 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2014-04-01 16:33:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-04-01 16:33:34 [post_content] => We are proud to share this interview with Roxana created by Crtl-D Design. Her interview shares her journey from Romania to Scotland and from Graphic Design to Service Design. Roxana has been with us for nearly two years and we proud to have her.  Hope you are inspired by her story. We certainly are. Enjoy! and of course make use of Google translate! [post_title] => Roxana shares her story with the Romanian Design Industry [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => roxanas-shares-her-story-the-romanian-design-industry [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=6795 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [65] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6764 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2014-03-21 14:38:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-03-21 14:38:07 [post_content] => “Big data is not about just handling volume, nor is it about data. It is about creativity. Combine technology advancements with human ingenuity and the possibilities are endless” Frank Buytendijk
Glasgow has recently been the lucky recipient of £24 million, courtesy of the Technology Strategy Board. Within the council a program called Future City | Glasgow has been set up in order to investigate ways of making Glasgow a safer, smarter and more sustainable city. One of the ways they aim to achieve this is by leading the way in using open data to become a more responsive and technology driven city though its public initiative, Open Glasgow.
 
Snook, with a citizen-led approach, has been commissioned to specifically investigate two key service areas within the city: waste collection and road repairs.
Using our service design approach, we are looking at how we can transform these two service areas over a period of 20 years. Our aim is to deliver a service that is relevant to the needs of people today, but also to grow with them into the future of tomorrow. It is not just about making Glasgow a future city, but a better city.
Since mid-November last year, we have run numerous public workshops, spoken to taxi drivers, bus drivers, students, waste experts and cyclists. We have even stood out in the famous Glasgow sunshine, handing out hot cups of tea, just to hear what is important to people on the topic of potholes and rubbish. We have also visualised problem areas to try to understand how current services work. You can follow our project via our blog and through the Twitter hashtag #ogsd.
Gopro, seeing the streets from a pedestrian perspective from Robin Bini Schneider on Vimeo. This project is a unique opportunity for Snook. We are able to share our agile methods of working whilst maintaining a collaborative approach, sharing insights with Future City | Glasgow and their clients. These clients make up a number of Glasgow based design firms also working with Future City | Glasgow. We think they are all amazing and love working in such a collaborative way. These clients are:
Tangent Graphic is an award winning agency specialising in brand identity & art direction. Tangent are working on a set of brand stories for Open Glasgow.
O Street is an agency that works across a broad range disciplines, with a focus on strong, creative thinking. They are working on a number of widgets and digital dashboards for displaying data in an accessible, understandable and clear way.
Stipso create visual content for living Infographics, which both display and collect data. They are looking at the technical aspects behind the widgets and dashboards.
Icecream Architecture is a consultancy for public engagement, the promotion of ideas and subsequent implementation. They are working on a number of public initiatives around the topic of digital literacy.
This is an exciting time for Snook to be working on such a unique project and to be working on new ways to envision the future of Glasgow’s services and future technologies. Watch this space.
[post_title] => Building a smarter glasgow through service design [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => building-a-smarter-glasgow-through-service-design [to_ping] => [pinged] => http://vimeo.com/85850696 [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=6764 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [66] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6743 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2014-03-05 09:26:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-03-05 09:26:44 [post_content] => I've been busy co-ordinating a conference that brings together practitioners from inside and outside of the public sector to discuss the application of design to the craft of public services. Stirling University are hosting the event in partnership with our friends visiting from Lapland University . The event is free to attend and is focused on cross pollination of ideas, based on stories of success and failure of Design in the public sector. We are particularly keen to highlight stories where there is longevity of approach and measurement of impact. Design thinking has gained recognition in the past decade as a supportive method for complex problem solving, the development of human-centred products, and an ideal practice for organising complex information and interactions. It has also been recognised as a useful process for the development of public service initiatives; with Service Design becoming the commonly adopted umbrella term for the application of user-centred design approaches to improving public service experiences through multi-stakeholder engagement. Service Design and, more widely, design thinking's profile, has been raised in Scotland through public sector bodies adopting these processes, local government's embedding them in-house and Government working with design partners to look at future ideas. We are now reaching a critical point where there is an understanding and wide spread recognition that design and its principles, when applied to complex future scenarios, have a role to play in the development of public services and government policy. Design is being applied in context to address complex emerging problems, including an ageing population, dementia, mental health, crime, education and waste. Add into this mix opportunities around open data, technology, smart cities, new forms of open partnerships, co-operative models and we have the potential to rethink the way public services can be designed and considered in the future. Doors will be open to all sectors and educational institutions to collaboratively consider the role Service Design (and, more widely, design approaches in general) plays in the past and present renewal of public services. We are currently finalising our speakers and time slots but so far we have brilliant and diverse group confirmed: Jari Rinne and Satu Miettinen of Lapland University Louise McCabe of Stirling University Sarah Drummond, Co-founder of Snook Julie Chrisite, PRESENT, Coproduction in East Dumbartonshire Trevor Lakey, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde John Flitcroft and Jenni Lennox, Dementia Dog Kate Dowling and Judith Midgley, IRISS (Pilotlight)  Stuart Bailey, Glasgow School of Art Anna Winters and Morag Campbell, Scottish Government Lizzie Brotherston, Snook and Scottish Government perspective Peter Ashe, ALISS and NHS Lorraine Gray, Scottish Social Services Council Mike Press, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design Lynne Wardle, Taylor Haig Valerie Carr, RITA Follow the hashtag #designforgov and remember get your tickets!  [post_title] => Renewing Public Services: Service Design in Scotland [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => renewing-public-services-service-design-in-scotland [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=6743 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [67] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 12846 [post_author] => 20 [post_date] => 2012-12-16 17:02:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-12-16 17:02:53 [post_content] => Recent questions about the difference between Snook’s service design approach and the LEAN approach have inspired me to put my thoughts around this into writing. As advocates of the benefits of design thinking, methods and tools we believe that these bring an additional creative dimension to organisations seeking to innovate and co-design new services that are user-centred and user-friendly. I have put together a table outlining some of the differences I see in LEAN and Service Design Approaches below. Although the different aspects are presented in binary form, we recognise that each item is on a spectrum from the analytic and scientific to the intuitive and creative.  

To help frame the discussion of the differences between the two approaches I am going back to my roots in architecture and design. Vitruvius, an architect living in the 1st century BC , defined the necessary qualities of architecture as firmitas, utilitas and venustas. Firmitas and utilitas can be translated quite easily as firmness or sturdiness and utility or functionality. Venustas is, however more elusive. Originally translated as ‘delight’ it also has a sense of grace, charm and beauty. Vitruvius’s principles were used by architects throughout the centuries to create buildings which combined sound engineering and aesthetic qualities. The modern movement in architecture, which centred around the Bauhaus in Germany, had a machine aesthetic and technological focus on new materials such as glass and steel and, in seeking ‘truth to materials’, eliminated all ornamentation or decoration in buildings, following the mantra that ‘form follows function’. Whatever your views on architecture, it is recognised that the modern movement, or international style resulted in some very soulless buildings. The stripping away of the principle of venustas (delight, beauty, charm), meant the removal of all extraneous ornamentation which, while ideologically sound, alienated those who were the inhabitants of these buildings. Another interesting point relating to the reductionism inherent in LEAN is that many of the individual components of these buildings were remarkably elegant in themselves. Somehow stripping individual elements back to their most basic form, highlighting the structural properties of the materials used, often (not always) resulted in something of beauty. However some elusive quality was lost when this approach was applied to a whole building. Often these buildings have little sense of the people who inhabit them, no personal touches indicating their character or personality. Using the same formula as the modern movement, LEAN focuses on evidence-based, mechanistic approaches to refining processes and reducing variation, eliminating waste and emphasising efficiency. LEAN and Six Sigma divide processes into discrete parts to be analysed and made subject to Total Quality Management formulae. These can certainly ensure the firmitas and utilitas of the various processes making up a service. But what of venustas? The aspects of delight which give one company, product or service that market differentiation which is such a key component in attracting and retaining customers? What of the personality, the distinctive character of the company? Service Design focuses on designing for experience, emphasising the involvement of the service user in co-designing the service. A service design approach is built on the generation of a deep and holistic understanding of the service user experience, uncovering the ‘touchpoints’ or points of emotional connection (both delight and despair) with a service. Considering the need for innovation and new models of user-centred services, we recognise that many large organisations function with fragmented structures and processes, departmental boundaries and hierarchies, making efforts at integrated organisational change challenging. Organisational Development (OD) experts make a distinction between first-order change, representing incremental changes within an organisation, and second-order or fundamental system change, where the core values and modes of operation are challenged and redeveloped (Bartunek and Moch 1987). It is recognised that protocol and process driven (first order) approaches can lock an organisation into fixed methods of thinking, perceiving and responding to situations. These lead to smoother functioning on a daily basis, and short term organisational and efficiency gains, but may act as barriers to transformation and innovation in the long run  (DiMaggio and Powell, 1983; Carley and Harrald 1997) I would suggest that LEAN, in its original form, functions as a means of achieving first order change – incremental, process focused improvements. Roger Martin in his book, The Design of Business: Why Design Thinking is the Next Competitive Advantage (highly recommended) talks about the ‘wicked problems’ facing business and society today, which can’t be solved using yesterday’s evidence base. The global recession and collapsing economies, an ageing population and unsustainable public services all qualify as ‘wicked problems’ in their multiple levels of complexity and impact. Martin suggests that design thinking offers the possibility of a context and creative environment for framing these problems in new ways. As we say at Snook, seeing differently, before doing differently. One of the other specific benefits of Service Design is in its participatory approach to the development of new services. Levasseur (2001) has suggested, ‘a fundamental principle of effective change management is that people support what they help to create’.  Public sector cuts, particularly, have prompted the need for new models of public service delivery, focused on co-design and coproduction (Cottam and Leadbeater 2004). The major challenges in healthcare, and increase in health inequalities in UK has prompted Marmot (2010) to suggest that a stronger emphasis must be given to individual and community empowerment, creating the conditions and increasing the opportunities for people to work with public service providers to participate in the definition of community solutions, enabling a real shift of power:
Without citizen participation and community engagement fostered by public service organisations, it will be difficult to improve penetration of interventions and to impact on health inequalities (Marmot 2010 p151).
An increase in participation can also lead to more appropriate and accessible services, while increasing social capital and people’s self confidence and health-enhancing attitudes (Popay, 2006).  Wanless (2004 and 2007) in attempting to assess the sustainability of the NHS, produced three scenarios of ‘fully engaged’, ‘solid progress’ and ‘slow uptake’, each related to how individuals might take responsibility for maintaining their own health. Fully engaged was the only viable route to a sustainable welfare system. The NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement has advocated a ‘design’ approach as offering the potential to produce transformational change in the NHS (Bevan and Robert, 2007). It is obvious from these references to the need for engagement in public services, that the challenge is to win the hearts and minds of communities and individuals to encourage them to take responsibility for their own wellbeing and develop supportive communities with less reliance on public sector provision of services. At Snook we believe we can help public sector organisations approach this new model of partnership working through using design tools and methods first of all to gain the deep understanding of where people are in their attitudes and motivations, secondly to create a democratic and creative environment where service users and public sector organisations can work together to turn recognised barriers and obstacles into opportunities for service improvement. Finally we prototype ideas, working iteratively, testing and refining services in practice, involving service users in co-designing and coproducing their new service models. Service Design methods and tools don’t apply only to public sector organisations however – they bring added value to any business seeking to engage in new ways with their clients or service users. Open innovation models have seen more companies partnering with clients to improve and customise products and services. Service Designers are moving from focusing on solutions to specific problems, to providing organisations with the tools and capacities for human-centred service innovation and transformation. So, back to our architectural principles of firmitas, utilitas and venustas. Services with a strong focus on a ‘delightful’ user experience, which adopt innovative models of service user engagement will, ultimately, be the services which stand out in the marketplace and offer the quality and functionality that people desire and need. For a deeper exploration of evidence and experienced based approaches see this academic paper I co-authored with some colleagues at ImaginationLancaster: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21960190 Also further discussion of design and organisational change can be found in this paper: http://www.haciric.org/static/doc/events/HaCIRIC10_Conference_Proceedings1.pdf  

References

Bartunek, J. M. and M. K. Moch (1987). "First-Order, Second-Order, and Third-Order Change and Organization Development Interventions: A Cognitive Approach." The Journal of Applied Behavioural Science 23(4): 483-500 Bevan, H., G. Robert, et al. (2007). "Using a Design Approach to Assist Large-Scale Organizational Change: "10 High Impact Changes" to Improve the National Health Service in England." The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science 43(1): 135-152. Carley, K. M. and J. R. Harrald (1997). "Organizational Learning Under Fire: Theory and Practice." American Behavioral Scientist 40(3): 310-332. Cottam, H. and C. Leadbeater (2004). Open Welfare: Designs on the public good. London, The Design Council. DiMaggio, P. J. and W. W. Powell (1983). "The iron cage revisited: Institutional isomorphism and collective rationality in organizational fields." American Sociological Review 48: 147-160. Levasseur, R. E. (2001). "People Skills: Change Management Tools - Lewin's Change Model." Interfaces 31: 71-73. Marmot, M. (2010). The Marmot Review: Fair Society, Health Lives. Strategic Review of Health Inequalities in England post-2010. London, The Marmot Review. Popay J (2006) Community engagement and community development and health improvement: a background paper for NICE (available on request by emailing antony.morgan@nice.org.uk or lorraine.taylor@nice.org.uk). Wanless, D. (2004). Securing Good Health for the Whole Population. HMSO. London. Wanless, D., J. Appleby, et al. (2007). Our Future Health Secured? A review of NHS funding and performance. The King's Fund. London. [post_title] => LEAN and Service Design | Understanding the differences. [post_excerpt] => Recent questions about the difference between Snook’s service design approach and the LEAN approach have inspired me to put my thoughts around this into writing. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => lean-service-design-differences [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=5295 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [68] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2850 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-07-10 10:55:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-07-10 10:55:37 [post_content] =>   I'm very pleased to announce we were accepted to go forward in the Design Council and Nominet Trust's Working Well challenge.  After a whistle stop tour to London to pitch we were informed that we'd made the final three.  At Snook we're pretty blown away as some of the others entries were of a really high quality. The challenge;
"With record numbers of 16-24 year olds not in education, employment or training, there is a pressing need to improve how young people secure the opportunities they deserve. Jargon such as ‘NEET’ not only does many a disservice, but presents the situation as a problem of economic policy rather than an opportunity to do something practical to help. The Design Council in partnership with Nominet Trust is running a competition to design, build and launch new digital products and services that help young people develop their talents and make a living. We believe well designed digital technology can build upon the skills and abilities of young people and the exceptional work of those already supporting them."  
We will be working with; Young Scot , a national youth information and citizenship charity for Scotland. They provide young people, aged 11 - 26, with a mixture of information, ideas and incentives to help them become confident, informed and active citizens. Firstport aims to release the potential of social entrepreneurship in Scotland to benefit communities and individuals and to promote social change. Telaco is a web development & communications consultancy based in Glasgow, Scotland. Six by Six are specialists in enterprise level online technology and e-commerce systems on Linux and PHP platforms.   Our idea is called Newstart - A programme that enables young people to form temporary micro-enterprises that respond to burning, societal questions via online publishing. Newstart will allow young people to develop soft skills in communication, collaboration and self-organisation, whilst gaining practical experience of self-employment. I'm really excited to be taking this forward, thanks to our partners and Design Council and Nominet Trust for believing in the idea. Watch this space. [post_title] => We're working on the Design Council's Working Well challenge [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => were-working-on-the-design-councils-working-well-challenge [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=2850 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [69] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1583 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-08-16 11:42:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-08-16 11:42:35 [post_content] => We are looking for 6-12 volunteers who are interested in festivals to play a part in this exciting project this Friday. The opportunity will most suit staff from Hogmanay, Imaginate, Science, Film & Storytelling festivals.
 But we welcome anyone who is interested in festivals! The opportunity is to carry out what is called a design brief, a short exercise taking a couple of hours where you look at a carefully selected element of the festival experience from a designer's perspective. And the results of your work will directly feed into what Snook create for the whole festivals community. Everyone in the festivals community will be invited in the autumn to learn about the customised tools & approaches devised from this process that Snook are developing as the main outputs. Please email design@festivalslab.com if you would like to take part. We are running 4 sessions, which all combine to make a design toolkit to assess and develop the Service Design of the Festivals. We'll tell you more about those when you drop us a line. Please pass this on to your festival colleagues who may be interested in the opportunity. [post_title] => Do you want to be involved in a festival design project? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => do-you-want-to-be-involved-in-a-festival-design-project [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1583 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [70] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1556 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-07-29 11:33:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-29 11:33:55 [post_content] => Edinburgh Festivals are some of the finest cultural experiences in the world and we are working with them to explore what they can learn from Service Design. We are working closely with the Festivalslab; a unique programme of work which identifies and develops ways to improve the world's festival city - for audiences, for artists, for partners and for the festival organisations themselves. The project kicked off with a basic introduction to how Service Design tools are relevant to designing festival experiences as services. We spent the afternoon with the Science Festival Team - including the development manager, the business director, the marketing manager, the generation science manager and the deputy director. Initially, we carried out small exploration exercises focused on seeing the world differently. Participants tried to book a festival ticket online and simultaneously wrote down a list of fifty things to capture the experience. This was very simple yet revealed key insights into the experience of booking a festival ticket online: the site never shows me an alternative, I want to give up and phone, why do I need to create an account? why do they need so much information? why can't you book tickets through the mobile application? Participants described these exploration tools as a "great chance to think virtually". One tool was designed to encourage thought experiments whilst walking around a public space. This resulted in metaphors around accessibility ; the festival offers multiple messages for multiple customers, and this metaphor encouraged thinking around who chooses what at what point. Why do people choose the events they do and how can we understand this better? We spent time exploring personas as a way to provide the team with different perspectives on the services they offer. After building up clear pictures of typical characters who do engage with the festival the team created their own personas of people who do not engage with the service. This exercise revealed assumptions around how and why people engage with the festival: "People decide they want to buy a ticket before hand and then invest a long time in booking". Creating personas sparked off interesting debate around the barriers to engagement and how people seek advice and recommendations around what event to attend and why. We then took these personas through a typical customer journey. This revealed lots of opportunities for innovation such as getting to and from events and the contrast between the touchpoints of an adults festivals experience to that of a child. Relevance is a big theme for the festival staff and they are clearly facing all the challenges that come with moving away from traditional science education to a more modern representation of science. As well as balancing the breadth and depth of their program they are focusing on helping people navigate their festival. We discussed key questions such as: How can we build communities and loyalties throughout the year with all stakeholders? How can we truly combat the stigma of science? How can we actively seek out the voices of our audiences? We are really excited about this project. In it's small way it may very well be another revolution in how the cultural sector innovates in the UK. We intend to bring design thinking and doing to the festivals and showcase the notion of seeing festivals as service experiences. [post_title] => Service Design for the festivals [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => service-design-for-the-festivals [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1556 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [71] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1542 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2011-07-22 11:40:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-22 11:40:25 [post_content] =>

What makes an engaging service design workshop? That was what I contemplated going into the second of six redesigning leaving care workshops the intention of which is to blueprint the aftercare care service, extract insights, challenges and opportunities, create ideas, prototype these, test them and substantiate all of this to create design solutions that improve the existing social and emotional support that care leavers receive. From feedback last week, the group suggested a few ideas as to what would make a better workshop - amongst other things was more movement, more breaks and more irn-bru. This we could do. Easily. However what became more of an enigma was what to do to really capture and engage the group. If you read last weeks blog, you’ll know we used quite a few service design tools to work though examples of stages the group would come across over the coming weeks, concept generation, prototyping, blueprinting etc – this was imperative, we wouldn’t have succeeded with future workshops without it - but what we found was that by making the decision to go along to this workshop with extra post it notes instead of a large clean blueprint, we were able to engage in conversation much more freely, therefore creating deeper and richer insights within the group. In one room Lauren and Chris worked with the care leavers, and I spent the first part of the day observing an exercise that Pamela Graham from STAF had suggested might be useful to introduce to the service provides. The purpose of the exercise was to take the service provides to a place where they were thinking on the same level with the care leavers (metaphorically speaking obviously) - back to their own childhood. Pamela led this conversation, hurtling through her past from the age of 15-25 and documenting her key life experiences and moments of transition. She then asked the group to do the same. We ended up with 6 stories, one as different as the next.

Pamela then introduced two new characters to the group - Pedro and Tallulah, both care leavers and both with equally individual stories. The objective was to consider what experiences these care leavers might have that differ to a ‘regular’ young person, essentially collaborating all the experiences and support that the group had as they grew up and considering this in relation to how the experience might contrast to that of a care leaver.

It was an exceptionally rich process which created a lot of interesting debate. Perhaps the most thought provoking of which was that the entire group agreed that they didn’t actually “find-themselves” until they were at least 25. They were able to make mistakes because they knew that if something did go wrong, they had a support network to fall back on. Care leavers in Scotland (generally speaking) leave care at 18, many much earlier – so the question was raised that if individuals with a stable upbringing were still finding their feet at around the age of 25 what would it be like for an 18 year old care leaver to negotiate this territory alone? Elsewhere, behind the sliding sound proofed wall of the 3 Villages Community Centre, Arrochar, the care leavers were busy working to develop a story of their own. They created Jemimia.

Jemima was an amalgamation of ideas and experiences that the care leavers crafted to develop a detailed persona. Brining the groups back together we began to discuss what each had worked. From here (after a break of course) we moved onto a user journey through Jemima’s life. Taking the Jemima’s story and beginning to discuss her journey from 15-25, specifically looking to address what key experiences she might go through, and at which point relevant service providers would communicate with her.

This is where it got really interesting. Once we started creating debate around the expectations that each service has of the next, and its users have of the service, the insights, opportunities and challenges came out in bunches. The intention had been to get through Jemima’s entire story, but the conversations that were happening around the room meant that we only made it a few years down the timeline – we’ll finish the rest next week.

So back to the first question – what makes an interesting service design workshop? Myearly vote: facilitating group discussions in an environment where everyone recognises that through speaking freely and openly about concerns, experiences and ideas we can create hugely valuable insights and opportunities to work with. Put simply, a group of open minded people with no agenda, talking as equals. Oh, and biscuits.

[post_title] => Re-designing support for care leavers. Take Two. [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => re-designing-support-for-care-leavers-take-two [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1542 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [72] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1503 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2011-07-19 17:34:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-19 17:34:36 [post_content] => It was one of those emails that I'll always remember - Stuart MacDonald, former creative vision and leader of The Lighthouse and Grays Art College in Aberdeen popped an email into the Snook inbox inviting me to teach in Taiwan. There wasn't really much to consider, other than yes! I've never been this far across the world, the farthest "east' I ever got was Tanzania back in 2004. So as I sit and write this at 39,000 ft as we skirt past Malaysia into Singapore I'm feeling slightly apprehensive, nervous but excited. I'm off to teach service design to a group of commercial design students at the National Tawain University of Science and Technology. I've got six days with them to introduce the concepts behind the discipline of service design and take their ideas from scratch to full service concepts for new tourist services in Taipei. Tough? Yes. As I've mulled over my day to day lesson plans on the plane through sunrise, sunset, sunrise, night…actually I have no clue what time it is any more…I've begun to question what l'll actually be teaching - I've been asked to teach service design. More often than not, when faced with this challenge I end up concentrating mostly on the idea of prototyping and bringing ideas to life with an underlying focus of user centric thinking. I don't care if the students design a product, a platform, a service or an application. What I do care about is how they consider the user experience and bring their thinking to life. What I've found fascinating is language, and even more so culture. I'd love to continue teaching around the world and importantly learning from students and professionals in different countries. When Snook taught in Finland at the start of the year it was fascinating to talk to some of the innovation leaders from the northern part of the country. They spoke about the lack of empathy in the services they deliver. Finland offer very efficient services but are missing the 'human' element. I remember asking why and the answer I got was the reality that the Fins are shy. It's part of their culture. My service experiences in Taiwan have already been entirely different to anything I've ever experienced before. As I entered the Singapore aircraft I couldn't believe there were framed pictures on the wall! It's the small touches - staff dressed in traditional Singapore costume , their politeness, the attentiveness to your needs  - that make a difference. But you know the thing that really got me ? The cutlery was metal and not plastic. It gave me that extra touch of luxury even though I was on an economy flight. I'm intrigued to experience what Taiwanese services will be like and how the students will perceive our style of thinking. How does a countries culture impact on the way services are delivered? What does this mean when we come to design services? Could I really design a service for Tawiain without embedding myself here for a sustained period of time? How do we consider the rich tapestry of different cultures when we are designing new experience for countries so different from our homes? It would be interesting to hear from those of you who have had experience in this.. As ever, I've got a plan but I'm willing to rip it up two hours into the week. That's the art of iterative delivery right? Wish me luck.   [post_title] => A message from Taiwan. Designing services away from home. [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => a-message-from-taiwan-designing-services-away-from-home [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1503 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [73] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1529 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-07-18 14:26:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-18 14:26:46 [post_content] => We are delighted to be part of the Newsnet Scotland features section this week. Newsnet Scotland was launched on 12th March 2010 by a small group of unpaid volunteers from Greenock. The site was set up in order to address what they believed to be an imbalance in the reporting of Scottish News and current affairs. They are a not for profit organisation who support major constitutional change for Scotland whether it be full fiscal autonomy or full independence.
"A new breed of designer is emerging in Scotland.  In the midst of public sector cuts they are showcasing the value of giving local citizens a voice.  But how can design tools and methods be used to create a positive social change? As part of the legislative programme of the Conservative – Liberal Democrat coalition agreement, the 'Big Society' proclamation declared its intention “to create a climate that empowers local people and communities, building a big society that will take power away from the politicians and give it to the people.”
A big thank you to the writer of this piece - the talented Kathleen Mc Laughlin. [post_title] => Scottish designers lead the way... [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => scottish-designers-lead-the-way [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1529 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [74] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1479 [post_author] => 5 [post_date] => 2011-07-08 09:11:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-08 09:11:31 [post_content] => As a result of research that IRISS conducted on the state of innovation and improvement in Scottish social services sector, key barriers to innovation emerged. A lack of time, finance and political interests were the three main barriers that were reported by the sector – maintaining the status quo rather than focusing on the needs of service users. This project is exploring how co-productive methods can be used in the social services sector to use resources differently and consider how this process may effect the status quo by involving service users and care leavers in the re-design of existing services. It will explore – with the Scottish Throughcare and Aftercare Forum, (STAF) Argyll and Bute Council, IRISS, Snook, practitioners and care leavers  – what a co-productive approach could look like and yield in the social work sector, and create and develop ideas so that they can be piloted and tested by the service providers who come into contact with the young people leaving care services. The first of six workshops kicked off yesterday. We focused on introducing the basics of service design and blueprinting so when we come to blueprinting their own journey through the leaving care service the concept won't be completely new to them. We introduced prototyping in a very simple way. After all, it is just a really simple cheap way of testing ideas. Asking the question 'when was the last time you prototyped?' we introduced familiar things we all do every day like travelling!
"Would you cycle, get a lift, walk with friends or catch the bus? It is likely you have tried more than one of these modes of transport before.  Every time you try a new route or a new vehicle you are prototyping - testing something new! You wouldn't jump on a bus for the first time if you were running late because that would be risky. You test things out when things are nice and simple so you are better prepared for your next journey. When was the last time you prototyped a journey?"
We collected words and phrases to capture how the group felt about prototyping: Today was undoubtedly the most sensitive environment we have ever worked in. Our approach to start very basic worked very well in the outset but slowly but surely became too abstract for the young people to relate to. Naturally, they have much more pressing issues to think about so it was difficult to keep their attention at times. Nevertheless, the day ended on a high as the participants felt they had 'designed a new service'. Entering any environment to deal with a sensitive subject is difficult, however what was unusual in this instance was the diversity of the group. In an afternoon where we had representation from the likes of the health sector, housing, social work, social care, Skills Development Scotland, STAF, as well as the care leavers themselves, trying to manage the expectations made the task all the more challenging. This wasn't just a unique situation for us, but for all the service providers who attended - and they admitted it really made them think differently! Toward the end of the workshop, this was summarised perfectly:
"This many service providers around a table with young people...that never happens"
For us there are big questions designers need to ask themselves as a industry around entering such sensitive and political environments... ( more thoughts on that coming up ) but for now as always, we strive to adapt what might have worked better and have evaluated this to ensure the knowledge we gained from this experience reflects how we approach future workshops. It was great to hear that Snook's input was valued as we were there with no agenda, no political involvement and we genuinely wanted to support this project.You can keep up to date with this project from IRISS's point of view here. We are very excited to be involved in collaboratively designing emotional and social support for care leavers! [post_title] => Re-designing support for care leavers [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => re-designing-support-for-care-leavers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1479 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [75] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1453 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2011-07-04 11:01:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-04 11:01:32 [post_content] => I graduated last week. It's become one of those little things I forgot I had to do, and in typical Drummond style, left it all a bit last minute to clear my library fines (I had kept that amazing co-design book by Stanley King for a wee bit too long) so in a last minute dash I made it to the ceremony. It was a strange feeling, sitting in the rather beautiful Bute Hall at Glasgow University nine months after I finished the Masters in Design Innovation at the Glasgow School of Art, to be honest it felt a little disconnected from when I had actually finished the course. It feels like the last two years have been a real up hill struggle. Lauren and I have hurtled through a course of surreal events - setting up MyPolice and Snook three months into my masters. I had to complete project work for the course and I worked alongside Skills Development Scotland who kindly provided me with the opportunity in the first place.  For those who stuck by me in those really tough, not getting a lot of sleep times, thank you very much.  I am available for parties and tipples in the pub now. What I learned that year was invaluable, working on the inside of the public sector and understanding how Scottish government develop policy and have them interpreted by various public bodes in Scotland into the services and products we use everyday.  It was a smack in the face that design won't save the world.  Not that I ever thought it would but it was a real two feet on the ground moment. In this year I figured out what design was good at, and what design isn't so good at.  I came to the conclusion (this is my simple explanation) that design is good for three things.  Visualising, prototyping and facilitating co-creation. At  the end of the day, in Neumier's words, designers are the link between thinking and doing, we're makers, craft makers if you will. Without making, I don't believe you're designing.  Without doing, you can't have design thinking.  There I said it, but it feels good to get off my chest. There's a lot of standing in cool shoes, american apparel polo shirts, thick rimmed glasses and staring at post its in our industry, and to be honest anyone can do that, and they do.  The post it is an amazing tool (for the less linear/business shop way of solving problems) But what I learned is the true power of design is bringing ideas to life, prototyping is king and we only do this through making. I'm glad my first couple of years in design education were spent designing coat hangers, bicycle stands and lampshades.  Here is where I really learned to design.  I learned you had to watch people, observe how they used coat hangers, draw new ideas out a hundred times over, make cardboard cut outs, then transform this into blue foam (the model making king material) and keep iterating until you reached a final product.  When our class was approached by Skills Development Scotland half way during my under graduate we were asked to make their service better.  I think we all went, 'eh?' as we had never looked at how design could be applied to services but with a wonderful support from Joe Heapy and Julia Schapher of Engine we managed to construct a way of applying our design skills to the project.  The results were well received by the company (and Scottish government) Why? Because we used visualisation and prototyping and had developed service and interactive concepts for people. Fast forward to graduating from my undergraduate in 2009 and having thoroughly thrown myself into Service Design with a range of projects from redesigning the rural post office to crowd sourced cycle lane concepts for a new bike network in Glasgow, Skills Development Scotland approached me to undertake the new Masters of Design Innovation course at Glasgow School of Art. They discussed their journey to use service design and embed it inside the organisation to improve the services and products they deliver.  How could design turn policy into good, people-centered outcomes?  They believed design was the way. I jumped at the chance, and slightly naive at first thought this was an easy problem design could fix. How wrong was I? I found the biggest difficulty was that whilst the Service Design and Innovation team were trying to explain design in the company, no one could see or understand the process (a hat tip from Mr Peter Gorb).  I came up with a circular visualisation of the design process which contained the company's development process and focused on process as opposed to tools which is often the main downfall of any organisation trying to adopt a new process.  Instead of the double diamond approach I felt a circle summed it up better and hinted at Kimbell's notion of 'Perpetual Beta', perhaps an Ohno Continuous Improvement concept if you will. I was incredibly proud for the work to be taken up to the board and spread out across the Service Design and Innovation Directorate, I hope it helps them on their journey to using design as a way to drive their company forward. The next stage which I unfortunately didn't get to conclude because of time constraints was how this wheel could be used to articulate design as the DNA of the company.  I built concepts for a CPD programme which taught design doing and thinking to staff whilst they were undertaking projects in the organisation.  I looked at how silos could be torn up and projects initiated with teams.  I was very lucky to see how all this could work in a real life scenario and I'll always be thankful to the company for giving me that opportunity.  It gave me the chance to consider how this could work in public services in Scotland on a grander scale, and the types of activities we could be doing to become a much more innovative nation. As a takeaway, I got access to people inside the public sector and a real insight into how public bodies operate, and how difficult it can be to achieve change in big organisations. On top of this work (which I will be realising as part of a new Snook initiative called 'Embedding design') I had the opportunity to flex my design muscles on Getgo Glasgow which won the Audi Sustain our Nation Prize and £20000 for Wyndford, an interaction design project on embedding yammer inside an organisation, created a toolkit to help libraries think about changing their service and tearing up the rule book and a dissertation which allowed me to meet and interview people I had admired for a long time.   Sitting down in my graduation, I felt proud to be heading back to our new Snook studio.  In what has been a great (and tiring) journey in two years from being a young undergraduate with no clue of what I'd be doing next, to being invited into Scottish Government to help them think about creativity last week, it hit me only as I walked out of Bute Hall and saw my nearest and dearest rushing with their cameras, probably missing the moment that the girl from Leith hadn't done that bad. I guess this is only just the beginning. And in case you wondered, Lauren has officially banned me from doing a PhD. [post_title] => Becoming a Master of Design Innovation [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => becoming-a-master-of-design-innovation [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1453 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [76] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1378 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-05-17 10:55:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-05-17 10:55:49 [post_content] => Contributing Editor of Fumsi, Joanna Ptolomey, asked me to explain more about service design and how it can make a huge difference to delivering and developing services, especially in information and libraries. Based on Joanna's questions I sent her four visual representations. To be honest, initially Joanna was not sure what to do with them, yet they perfectly explain the design ethos and process. We decided that Joanna should interpret them and provide some commentary. The rest is up to you – the readers! What do you think they say to you, what does it mean in your context and situation, and can you use these visuals to start thinking differently about your own service design and delivery? Click here to read the full article. If you would like to talk about the work we do within libraries get in touch! [post_title] => Using co-design to innovate in libraries [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => using-co-design-to-innovate-in-libraries [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1378 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [77] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1296 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-04-22 10:13:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-04-22 10:13:38 [post_content] => This week I facilitated an intoductory session to Service Design for staff from Universities across the UK. This was the first time I have ever delivered a workshop from the other side of a screen and I must say it worked surprisingly well! Of course, being there in person is the ultimate preference but with the help of the organisers and some brilliant technology we made it work! We started off with some playful tools around story boarding and journey mapping. It was clear the audience were very good with words but felt uncomfortable drawing! Once I reinforced the reason behind drawing and they understood why they were drawing and what the value was - they got it. This session was a chance for people to start thinking about how Service Design is relevant to higher education. It was a chance for them to play with techniques and ultimately realise that this approach is very beneficial. A big chunk of the audience were from an IT background and the concept of visualising was new to them. Of course a change in mindset doesn't happen over night and the screen was definitely a barrier but the participants were keen to see the social side of Service Design and the practical examples of services Snook have designed. The participants left the event asking "Who do I need to talk to?" "Who should I be listening to?" There was a real buzz in the room and lots of story telling happening. Service Design offered them a fresh lens to look at their projects, they had never considered engaging a diagonal slice of their organisation - experts like janitors, dinner ladies and receptionists. I was fascinated by the questions that were raised around building personas and the value they bring. The level of detail some of the groups went into was truly brilliant but some struggled to see the value at first. The audience have realised although they used to think they understood their audience they actually do not!  - so in their minds it made no sense for them to create personas! "How can we create an empathic persona when we don't know the students well enough?" "How can you possibly create personas that cover everyone who will use the service?" I explained the value of creating personas is about viewing services and scenarios from someone elses perspective. They are about training your mind to become empathic very quickly and putting your self in the shoes of people who live a very different life to you.
"I was at the other side of this video link watching Lauren's presentation from Nottingham, it was totally engaging and I learned so much, until the fire alarm went off that is! Otherwise I left feeling very inspired by Snooks approach to service design" Laura Henaghan, University of Glasgow
We had to cut the session short due to a very loud fire alarm but it did spark off a discussion around the use and detail of personas.  Many people in the audience had never tried this approach before and were uncertain about the level of detail to go into and when to use them at first.
"I think the introductory presentation worked really well as it put the practical uses of service design into context, using real-life examples.  Up until now, apart from last year's projects, most of the people in the audience who'd heard of service design (never mind actually use it) had not seen it put into practice. The practical sessions were well thought through and gently led people through from one stage to the next.  It certainly got people talking (in fact they didn't want to stop!) and whilst they found it hard to actually put pen to paper and draw (it's hard to get academics to do this!), once they got the hang of it, there was no stopping them." Sharon Perry, Learning Technology Advisor, JISC CETIS
One of the participants sent the organisers an e-mail to say "[they] have returned to work brimming with ideas" after the service design session.  So it looks like we got people thinking! Snook are one of five critical friends involved in this program. The others have expertise in CRM (Customer Relationship Management), SLRM (Student Lifecycle Relationship Management), information management systems and social media, and one still be appointed with expertise in alumni. Service Design is gathering momentum in the higher education sector and we are very excited to be part of it!       [post_title] => JISC CETIS Relationship Management Meeting - Service Design Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => jisc-cetis-relationship-management-meeting-service-design-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1296 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [78] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1179 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-04-08 09:46:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-04-08 09:46:43 [post_content] => Snook are part of an exciting new project at the University of Bolton. Since connecting with @myderbi and @dwrgi we have been hoping an opportunity for us to collaborate would arise. The JISC Relationship Management Programme projects run for eighteen months from March 2011. These projects are focused on improving the student experience in two areas: The audience will be university staff from various adminstrative departments, such as alumni, student services/support, IT, business, research etc rather than teaching staff.  They are being asked to use service design techniques to help in two areas: * Student retention, progression and completion - i.e. if a student is at risk of not completing the course, how do we know?  What can we do to monitor the situation and how can we help?  Of course, there will be some occasions when a student does have to leave their course, but we need to try and help those who are struggling, feeling disenfranchised or unhappy with the university processes, etc.  Some of the projects will be looking at IT interventions to help in this area - but they need to find out where the problems are first. * Alumni - How can a university make the best use of it's alumni and what services can it provide to them?  Suggestions include alumni mentoring schemes to help undergrads, entrepreneurial advice and guidance, systems to give discounts to past students who wish to undertake another course at the same institution, ensuring engagement (via social networking software?) with the institution, etc.  Some of the projects will be IT based and will focus on the social networking aspects, others will be less IT heavy. In both cases, the majority (bar one or two projects who were also involved in last year's Relationship Management projects - including Jean Mutton at Derby Uni) will have had no experience of service design or even what it is. Derby have produced a basic guide to service design - this has been a helpful way to provide a basic introduction to service design to their team . I will be delivering a half day introduction to Service Design, mentoring the projects teams and giving feedback on project deliverables. I can't wait to get started! [post_title] => Service Design at the University of Bolton [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => service-design-at-the-university-of-bolton [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1179 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [79] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 950 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-04-04 17:11:14 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-04-04 17:11:14 [post_content] => We are in the middle of massive change. Society is slowly but surely giving way to the notion of communities being people centered. This means that people who are not educated in design are designing and the boundaries between disciplines are blurring. Now the action is in the fuzzy front end of the development process with a focus on experiential rather than physical concerns. It’s all about new ways to understand and to empathise with the needs and dreams of real people in their communities. So this is an exciting and a confusing time for designers. The excitement comes partly from the significant recent interest of the planning community in the value of service design. The excitement is particularly evident in the fuzzy front end of the design development process. The buzz words being thrown around today include co-creation, innovation, design thinking, human-centered, people-centered, user-generated and so on. Exactly what co-creation is and how it is to be done is generating a fair amount of the confusion, debate and interest. We believe co-creation puts tools for creativity and communication in the hands of the people who will be served through design. It is only though collective thinking and acting that we will be able to use design to help address the challenges we face today. Co-creation is about connecting people. There is a method, a framework that can be taught conceptually and tools that can be embedded inside organizations. But at the heart of it is transforming people who suddenly see the world through a different lens. So what makes designers good at co-creation? We visualise. The unique skills in our toolbox are advanced skills in drawing people, ideas and scenarios. Someone clever once said ‘a picture is worth a thousand words’. This phrase, as overused as it is, refers to the idea that complex stories can be explained with just a single still image, or that an image may be more descriptive, useful and provocative than substantial amounts of text. Makes sense, doesn’t it? Designers work with neighbourhoods and communities to visualise their lives, ideas and opinions. Visualising is all about empathising and seeing the world as a child would. The best designers are the keenest observers who notice little things that others miss. Drawings attract attention quickly. They allow people do their own thinking and ultimately tells a story. Designers spend years learning how to draw. Drawing is not just about illustrating idea, that can also be created with graphics software. Instead, designers learn to draw so they can express ideas. Words and numbers are fine, but only drawing simultaneously reveals both the functions of a new idea and how it makes people feel. To draw ideas accurately, decisions have to be made that can be avoided by even the most academic report; aesthetic issues have to be addressed that cannot be resolved by the most intricate statistical paper. Whether the design task at hand is a mobile phone, a new shop front or a new postal service, drawing forces decisions. Our job is not only to understand what is going on inside peoples heads but to find ways of getting that thinking out into the world, where it can be shared with others and, ultimately, translated into ideas that lead to action. [post_title] => What makes designers good at co-creation? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hat-makes-designers-good-at-co-creation [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=950 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [80] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-04-04 14:40:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-04-04 14:40:15 [post_content] =>

matchable is a new service that connects design students with the health and well-being sector.

There is an exciting opportunity for Scotland’s world class health service to be designed in collaboration with our world class art schools. The four major art schools in Scotland offer product design courses which include elements of service design. Heads of Design have expressed great interest in contributing to redesign of health services and students will have a valuable opportunity to apply and develop their talent and knowledge in the ‘real’ world. The Quality Strategy describes an aim to develop a world class health service: “We will have to involve the people of Scotland to a greater extent in the co-production of health and health care…recognising and valuing diversity, promoting a person-centred approach and involving people in the design and delivery of healthcare.” Snook believe innovation will be a vital factor in developing public services in a climate of financial restraint and generation of ideas will be key. Involving people co-designing healthcare systems requires approaches developed in asset, improvement and social innovation models. The idea of tapping into the creativity of art schools has been rehearsed in the ALISS project (Access to Local Information to Support Self Management). The ALISS Project worked with Snook and FutureGov to use innovative approaches to generate ideas about self-management of long-term conditions. The project’s principle aim is to improve “findability” of local resources which will support self management which will be achieved through the technology part of the ALISS project. In March 2010 ALISS ran an Open Innovation Process which concluded in a 2 day Innovation Workshop. Bright enthusiastic final-year design students and people living with long term conditions, and staff from NHS Scotland, Scottish Government and voluntary sector came together to produce 6 first class ideas for improvement. The students appreciated an opportunity to practice techniques and people with long term conditions enjoyed developing ideas for improvement. This collaborative effort can be replicated nationwide under the aegis of the Quality Strategy and has great potential to improve the way health services in Scotland are designed and developed. The key task is to connect two communities – this will be organised through establishing a brokerage service, where interested parties can connect to use simple service design techniques. To learn more visit http://matchablehealth.wordpress.com/ [post_title] => matchable: students and service design for health and well being [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => matchable-students-and-service-design-for-health-and-well-being [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=937 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [81] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1261 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2011-04-01 06:12:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-04-01 06:12:21 [post_content] => This post was originally written a wee while ago, during my student days. I think it shows a good representation of the inside of an almost-graduating design student's head - looking to their future, imagining their place within it and then applying themselves to work towards it. This post follows a series of conversations and thoughts I was sharing with classmates and tutors surrounding my final project: pre:design. Transcript of my letter to myself: "This diagram is nice, pretty. It is obvious, it will work. But it is hinged on several details, points and opinions which I have not got pinned down. I need to know about the relationship between the organisation and the designer. What is being asked of the designer - what does the organisation expect of them - working with/against their preconceptions of design. What is it that the organisation want from the collaboration? What do they see the benefit of  Service Design as being - and why have they chosen to take on Service Design rather than a traditional marketing expert? In addition I need to show, through the process that I will add, the value of the designer. So that at the end of my 'process' the organisation/business  can leave with an idea of how creative solutions can modify their business, but also what the designer can do to provide more depth, variety and end results. Essentially, that the organisation sees the benefit of employing the designer. Designers tend to enter a project with a preconception of what the organisation wants from them - is there a way to specify and narrow the seemingly huge description of service design to make it a. easier for the company to digest, b. obvious to them what the benefit for them will be, transferring positive outputs into potential future ventures. Designers are often very comfortable in our own language. The design vocabulary and the business one are sometimes similar but predominantly different. The designer needs to speak and deliver in translatable terms. To show what they do - by showing, inviting in, there is generally no problem with non-design savvy/design literate professionals being able to see your process and your value. It can be as simple as that. But how to show it? We need to step back from the jargon - and identify the kernels of knowledge/skill which our clients need us for. What we deliver. I need to know what clients expect of designers? What attracts them to Service Designers rather than other agencies? Build tools around these needs. Quote of the date: "the key to explaining Service Design is not to mention Service Design." Alex Allen    28.4.10 [post_title] => To explain Service Design - don't mention Service Design [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => this-post-was-originally-written-a-wee-while-ago-during-my-student-days-i-think-it-shows-a-good-representation-of-the-inside-of-an-almost-graduating-design-students-head-looking-to-their-future [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=1261 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [82] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 414 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2011-02-11 16:51:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-02-11 16:51:31 [post_content] =>
Students presenting journey maps
For the past two years, we have worked with Auburn university and Chris Arnold to run Service Design boot camps for his industrial design students.  Last year, Sarah and Chris co-wrote a paper for the Industrial Designer's Society of America that was published in August 2010.  It reflects on the workshops we ran and how valuable service thinking and design can be for the discipline of industrial design. We produced a short synopsis to communicate the paper;
"Taking part in an intensive workshop held in Scotland during the spring of 2010, a group of undergraduate industrial design students from the United States received a first hand introduction to the techniques and mindset used in the creation of value added services. Based on this experience, the authors assert that the mindset evidenced in Service Design may enable students, even those in the early stages of their design education, to better identify, develop, and communicate solutions more fitting to 'real world' contexts. This is of particular importance in design education where students should receive substantive instruction, not only addressing the grammar of design, but also the purposeful application of its process. The ultimate goal and anticipated benefit of this workshop was not simply for these students to build skill in the application of service design tools, but in challenging each to think differently about the way that they approach future projects. In the paper the authors share the practical knowledge gained, and observations made during the introduction of the service design mindset to an inexperienced, albiet design savvy audience. The structure and outcomes of this workshop are offered as a starting point for future discussion regarding the role of Service Design, and opportunity provided within the broad context of design and education."
The year the paper was written we gave students a live brief to redesign the library experience.  Using journey maps to expand the students thinking and consider experiences, we sent them out ready to observe and document experiences to find pressure points in the system, or spot opportunities to do things better.

[slideshare id=3848282&doc=introduction-100425100350-phpapp01]

We took students through persona building, to fully understand the people they were designing for and how to prototype their solutions.  We ended up with some great services and propositions from the groups including a new tourist/travel agent service inside the library which utilised the travel books and a smart advertising system to pull more users in. You can download the paper here and view some of the student presentations. Where do you see the links between industrial design and Service Design? [post_title] => Auburn U.S.A meets Service Design [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => auburn-meets-service-design [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=414 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [83] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4090 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2011-02-11 15:29:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-02-11 15:29:32 [post_content] => I was delighted to be invited to present at Service Design Thinks in Leeds. The focus of the evening was "Service Design: How we do it…techniques in the context of live projects" In the first Service Design Thinks Leeds, they asked about the starting points for service design - the voices and insights that help us create new services and improve ones already in delivery.

This time they moved onto the next stage, to delve more deeply into how services are designed
* How do designers turn insight into action? * How are users involved in the creation of a service? * How do you translate concepts into reality? * Can service design change people’s behaviour or simply adapt to it? * What’s the difference between design and service design techniques? * Who designs services in different contexts?
I was speaking alongside Simon East from Drivegain: Designing a new eco-driving service ( @DriveGain @SimonatHome ) Simon has worked with mobile devices and applications for over 20 years. He started his career at British PDA pioneer Psion and was part of the executive team that transformed Psion’s software group into Symbian. In 2001 he founded the mobile photo uploading company Cognima (later to become ShoZu). In December 2008 he co-founded DriveGain, who produce an iPhone app that helps people save fuel as they drive. Jean Mutton from the University of Derby was also talking about designing the enrollment experience at the University of Derby @myderbi The application of service design techniques is relatively new in the higher education sector, but in the light of the Browne Review and the uncertain future of HE funding, the need to place the student at the heart of the service process is gaining increased recognition. In this session, Jean will talk about the impact which a service design approach has made on the student experience of enrollment at Derby. My talk was entitled "How Snook do Service Design in Scotland" @redjotter The event was open to everyone working in the design of services whether it be corporate/public/education/health/social sectors. I really wish I had been there in person and unfortunately we lost Skype connection. I received lots of kind hellos and feedback and made some new twitter friends. Thank you Service Design Leeds! [post_title] => Service Design Leeds [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => service-design-leeds [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=385 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [84] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4081 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2010-12-06 18:11:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-12-06 18:11:02 [post_content] => Collaborations between Service Design and businesses require introduction and understanding of Service Design for projects to flow effectively. pre:design does exactly that. We have created a platform for discussion, providing introductory insights into the Service Design process, project structure and the role designers play. The results is more informed clients and more effective services. pre:design explores the crossroads that Service Design continually finds itself at. There has been substantial work into providing foundations, a base for all of the collaborating disciplines to build from. Now we are seeing a shift towards the future, to shaping the discipline into a working model of what service design will become, what it will be involved in and what it will work to achieve. As a debutante preparing to make her entrance into the Service Design community, Kirsty wanted to scope the directions and planned routes that the discipline is taking.  There is a lot of talk about movement, and one of the biggest shifts she discovered was the planned introduction of Service Design and design thinking into large organisations across the public and private sectors. From government-run educational bodies to international chartered accountants, plans are being made to incorporate in-house teams of designers and design-thinkers into previously non-design related roles. Design, and especially the intangible aspects of Service Design, cannot simply be placed into an organisation or business. The process and methods used need to be understood, if not completely then at least to some extent, by those who the work will affect. pre:design offers the change for designers to transfer their methods, and for the organisations to explore the routes that Service Designers take, and begin to incorporate their thinking into current plans and projects across all levels of the organisation. pre:design works as a workshop, exploring how Service Design can be harnessed, what it achieves, what the role of designers is and how the discipline can work for organisations who see themselves as 'non-designers' It does this through five stages; a two minute introductory video, a group activity of scoping a future for their organisation unrestricted by finances using a large wall chart entitled ‘in an ideal world’, another to gather current on-goings and planned projects and do begin to categorise these by the type of work which they involve using postcards and coloured, graphical stickers. The fourth activity is intended to be more personal and reflective, encouraging the individual participants to discuss what they can bring to projects, what they are already good at, and what they would like to develop. This is done through a series of flashcards, each holding a particular inclination, skill or way of working. Each participant picks five, and describes to the group why they would like to be associated with these skills in the future. pre:design ends with a take-away postcard for participants, featuring the main learnings of the session; points to remember and areas to think over. We are very interested in what pre:design can become, who it will involve and what we will all learn from it. If you'd like to be involved, please get in touch! [post_title] => pre:design [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => predesign [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=177 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [85] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4077 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2010-11-09 21:16:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-11-09 21:16:00 [post_content] => September 2008 To overcome the rising loss of the UK postal service, Douceurs is a service solution enabling people to send letters to their future. This poetic service encompasses the beauty, simplicity and personal touch of traditional communication methods. To better understand the issues currently facing the UK postal service, Lauren carried out interviews with archivists, members of the Royal Mail Innovation Team, Postmen, authors, historians and poets. To investigate the social role of the Post Office and uncover traditional communication methods, Lauren interviewed a group of elderly ladies in Aberdeen , carried out a playful communication experiment in Edinburgh, and set up a free-typing service outside a Post Office in St. Andrews. The final Douceurs service enables and encourages people to send letters to their future. In designing the service a number of design principles were outlined, a brand identity developed, a business model explored and user touchpoints were thoroughly analysed. The service journey was mapped and explored, and the design of Douceurs products (envelopes, stamps, website) were fully prototyped. The Douceurs service solution is designed to be centrally accessed via a website, offering a national (and international) portal and potential for the project’s success and future development. As the world becomes more technologically advanced, Lauren believes we all need reminding of the simpler beauties in life. Douceurs takes elements of the postal service to a new and contemporary level of user engagement. The insight for the service design has come from real people with real lives. Douceurs is a new and innovative response to the loss of post offices and has the promise of infiltrating our lives many years from now. http://douceurs.wordpress.com/ [you tube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5sXCmjHFV0] [post_title] => Douceurs: A service designed to overcome the rising loss of the postal service [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => douceurs-a-service-designed-to-overcome-the-rising-loss-of-the-postal-service [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=150 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [86] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4074 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2010-10-29 14:02:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-10-29 14:02:03 [post_content] => Mission Models Money is a passionate network of thinkers and doers whose vision is to transform the way the arts use their resources to support the creation and experience of great art. MMM chose Snook to design a new programme of work currently in co-design stage with a wide network of individuals and organisations across the UK's not for profit arts and cultal sector. The team had never thought about what their offering as a ‘service’, the word ‘service’ conjures up thoughts of transactional exchanges and for others it has much more positive connotations such as ‘being of service’ which leans towards the notion of the gift economy. A big part of our role was to ensure clarity, as MMM needed a clear and jargon-free explanation of their service offering. We spent time understanding this new phase as a service, mapping programme outcomes and relation to stakeholders and really imagining what MMM’s new service might look like from a user perspective. The trio got colourful with cartoons and story telling and it really helped bring it to life! You can see pictures of the tools we used and the outcomes generated here. Read more about this piece of work on Mark Robinson's blog
"So here’s just three areas for any arts organisation to ponder using a service design approach: 1. How do artists experience your organisation? What’s the conversation you have with them like? What makes them feel a genuinely equal part of the organisation or project? How do they meet with people? How are they represented in your communications and other ‘imagery’? What do they actually do with you? How do you maintain the relationship change when the production or exhibition is over, if at all? 2. If your work includes participation or learning or engagement – or indeed any other way of ‘people doing things not just watching’ – how does the individual experience that? What are the key moments and how do you want them to feel? Are you designing the interaction, the spaces, the materials, to get as close to that result as you can? What would you want if you were that member of the public? What language do you use, and whose is it - yours or theirs? 3. What service do you provide to the people you call funders, and how do they experience and understand that? How do you communicate to them – where and when, and with what? Think of it from their seat – what’s their ideal experience and how close to it are you currently? How could the relationship grow? What happens to the contact when they stop funding you?"
If you want to know more about this project, email lauren@wearesnook.com [post_title] => MMM - Service Design Cues for The Arts [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => mm [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com//?p=19 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [87] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 16 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2010-10-29 13:54:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-10-29 13:54:42 [post_content] => We created a series of workshops with 4th year design-engineering students; introducing them to user centered design. We took our workshops up to Forres, and explored user-centred design for a product-orientated project. Snook were asked to be involved in a product-focused project, involving the penultimate year of Product Design Engineering students at the Glasgow School of Art. The project centred on the re-design of pendant and wrist-worn personal alarms for the elderly, and was to involve a series of workshops with users to capture vital information, feedback and ideas for improvement. The students had never encountered this type of user-involvement in any of their previous projects, and so Snooks initial role was to introduce methods and tools for capturing users’ insights and opinions. During briefing and teaching sessions with the class, we explored how to approach a workshop; what types of questions to consider asking, how to position yourself in the room, how to distribute roles amongst the students to collect as much information as possible. We introduced our tools; Personas and User Journeys to fill in with text and/or drawings and made sure that the students were familiar and comfortable to use them for the first time. Our first trip to Forres, and the students’ first user-involvement workshop went really well. The students taking to the tools, and really engaging with the conversations and questions they were involved in. Snook's role here was to act as a touring facilitator, moving between the rooms of students ensuring the workshop was flowing as intended, and to add guidance and answer questions as the day went on.  As the workshop progressed, the students were beginning work with their users to create quick mock-up models and sketches. These ideas were then presented back to the entire collection of students and service users at the end of the first workshop. Several weeks later, Snook were involved in the project again. By now the students, in their groups, had narrowed their focus down to two concepts and were developing variations within these ideas. The next workshop was intended to allow the students to explore these ideas with their users, and to add to and develop them further. This time, instead of supplying the students with pre-determined templates to fill out, Snook encouraged the groups to create and manage their own sessions. Each group had different ideas as to what they wished to gain from their users; material preference/aesthetics/level of technology for example, and so Snook’s involvement was to guide the students in the creation of their own templates. The second session of user-involvement took place in Forres. Another early start and a bus full of sleepy students, another tour through areas of Scotland we want to be spending much more time in! This time round, the students were using their time with their users to present their concepts to the entire audience, and then dividing into smaller groups to discuss their ideas in detail, gather feedback and together, create alternative suggestions. In a matter of weeks, and only two user-engagement sessions, the students had gone from being wary of the idea of customer engagement to confidently chatting about their projects, their own plans and their users likes and life. Conversations were a brilliant mix of types of plastic, strength of magnets, Harley Davidsons, types of tea and art exhibitions visited. This particular workshop was intense, in order to make use of the limited time available in Forres we had scheduled in a round-robin of feedback sessions, allowing each group to talk to as many users as possible. We ended with tired but enthusiastic students, new and informed ideas to develop, a better understanding of what user-engagement can achieve and how to structure a session. Our service users were thoroughly impressed with the students’ ideas, thinking and attitudes.

Several weeks later, Snook were involved in the project again. By now the students had narrowed their focus down to two concepts and were developing variations within these ideas. The next workshop was intended to allow the students to explore these ideas with their users, and to add to and develop them further. This time, instead of supplying the students with pre-determined templates to fill out, Snook encouraged the groups to create and manage their own sessions. Each group had different ideas as to what they wished to gain from their users; material preference/aesthetics/level of technology for example, and so Snook’s involvement was to guide the students in the creation of their own templates.

This second session found the students creating their own templates to ask questions by. The students operated on a round-robin system, moving rooms every 30 minutes to speak to different users and so get as much feedback as possible. Snook’s role here was to keep everybody to time, and to aid in any discussions. The students had a collection of prototypes, in different sizes, colours and materials to try out and so the workshops were fun and active with the users trying on different alarms.

From no user-contact in any of their previous projects to having discussions about grandchildren and painting classes only one workshop later – it was amazing to see how the students took to this way of working. The examples that they were drawing upon really enhanced their concepts, and they were able to both illustrate and justify their main points with impressive instinct.

Snook are really looking forward to the next round of projects that this class tackle – they are really showing that a user-centred approach can come from an engineering background.

 

We created a series of workshops with 4th year design-engineering students; introducing them to working with users. We took our workshops up to Forres, and explored user-centred design for a product project.

 

Snook were asked to be involved in a product-focused project, involving the penultimate year of Product Design Engineering students at the Glasgow School of Art. The project centred on the re-design of pendant and wrist-worn personal alarms for the elderly, and was to involve a series of workshops with users to capture vital information, feedback and ideas for improvement. The students had never had this type of user-involvement in any of their previous projects, and so Snook’s initial role was to introduce methods and tools for capturing users’ insights and opinions.

During briefing and teaching sessions with the class, we explored how to approach a workshop; what types of questions to consider asking, how to position yourself in the room, how to distribute roles amongst the students to collect as much information as possible. We introduced our tools; personas and user journeys to fill in with text and/or drawings and made sure that the students were familiar and comfortable to use them for the first time.

Our first trip to Forres, and the students’ first user-involvement workshop went really well. The students taking to the tools, and really engaging with the conversations and questions they were involved in. Snook’s role here was to act as a floating facilitator, moving between the rooms of students ensuring the workshop was flowing as intended, and to add guidance and answer questions as the day went on.

As the workshop progressed, the students were beginning to divide down particular routes, working with their users to create quick mock-up models and sketches. These ideas were then presented back to the entire collection of students and service users at the end of the first workshop.

 

Several weeks later, Snook were involved in the project again. By now the students, in their groups, had narrowed their focus down to 2 concepts and were developing variations within these ideas. The next workshop was intended to allow the students to explore these ideas with their users, and to add to and develop them further. This time, instead of supplying the students with pre-determined templates to fill out, Snook encouraged the groups to create and manage their own sessions. Each group had different ideas as to what they wished to gain from their users; material preference/aesthetics/level of technology for example, and so Snook’s involvement was to guide the students in the creation of their own templates.

This second session found the students creating their own templates to ask questions by. The students operated on a round-robin system, moving rooms every 30 minutes to speak to different users and so get as much feedback as possible. Snook’s role here was to keep everybody to time, and to aid in any discussions. The students had a collection of prototypes, in different sizes, colours and materials to try out and so the workshops were fun and active with the users trying on different alarms.

From no user-contact in any of their previous projects to having discussions about grandchildren and painting classes only one workshop later – it was amazing to see how the students took to this way of working. The examples that they were drawing upon really enhanced their concepts, and they were able to both illustrate and justify their main points with impressive instinct.

Snook are really looking forward to the next round of projects that this class tackle – they are really showing that a user-centred approach can come from an engineering background.

[post_title] => Product Design Engineering, MIT and Horizon Scotland in Forres. [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => forest [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com//?p=16 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [88] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4071 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2010-10-11 14:35:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-10-11 14:35:45 [post_content] => "Having dug "beyond basics" of Service Design in many interesting presentations and workshops at last year’s sdn conference, it is now time to strengthen the relation between clients and Service Designers and support the cooperation and exchange between professionals. We will present a vivid mix of different presentations, workshops and papers in order to provide you with academic and practical expertise from renowned international players in the Service Design field. Additional to the designed conference time there will be a main focus on "open space" - time to connect, discuss and exchange. Don’t miss this chance to socialise, gain knowledge and exchange experiences with Service Designers, clients and service-oriented companies worldwide!" Watch the video of Snook's keynote presentation   [post_title] => Snook Keynote at Service Design Network Conference [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snook-keynote-at-service-design-network-conference [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=354 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [89] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 337 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2010-09-11 14:23:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-09-11 14:23:48 [post_content] => This month I flew over to Ireland to spend an afternoon with the Designing Dublin Team. ( hat tip to @mikepress for inspiring the content of this talk ) http://www.vimeo.com/15223366 designingdublin.com/ "Lauren Currie from Snook flew in from Glasgow to talk to the team about her experiences of being a young, female entrepreneur working in the area of service design. She provided wonderful advice to the team about listening, putting yourself in other people’s shoes and creating positive change, with the mantra, “design WITH people rather than FOR people”." [post_title] => Lauren visits Designing Dublin [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => lauren-visits-designing-dublin [to_ping] => [pinged] => http://www.vimeo.com/15223366 [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=337 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [90] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4062 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2010-09-09 22:33:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-09-09 22:33:30 [post_content] =>

 

Skills Development Scotland are a non-departmental public body of 1400 staff, that brings together the careers, skills, training and funding services of Careers Scotland, Scottish University for Industry (learndirect scotland) and the skills functions of Scottish Enterprise and Highlands & Islands Enterprise.  SDS play a central role in raising employment levels and productivity, they are fundamental to ensuring Scotland's businesses have the capability to compete successfully both now and in the future.

I spent 12 months working with the company to look at how design could be embedded inside their organisation to drive forward innovation, develop new service propositions and re-evaluate existing propositions.  This project was undertaken in collaboration with the Glasgow School of Art's new Masters in Design Innovation course, and the outcome of the project is a thesis entitled 'Embedding design in the public sector: Changing our thinking.' This publication is will be available later this year.

   

I worked closely with the Service Design and Innovation directorate and front line service providers. The aim was to understand the organisation and focus on where design could be applied. The new Service Design and Innovation team must prosper inside the organisation as an in house design capability and work against a mentality where work falls on the business mental model of task based activity, departments in silos, and ideas are often developed from quantitative reports.

Academically the work challenged the development of a 'service design toolkit' and looked at a larger, embedding and CPD programme that would build the understanding and capabilities of staff to use design thinking. I worked on the case of how design thinking and processes can be used to drive forward innovation in a safe and simple way, demystifying design and breaking it down into bite size chunks.

 

I looked at how design would become the DNA of the company and permeate every activity and department.  The project was less about design as an activity or process but more about creating a designful company; an organisation that was capable of developing great service experiences rather than just jumping straight into delivery mode.

The work pulled together 'design tools' and other methodologies from various disciplines to map these around a process so that people associated activities with different stages of service development.  The paper challenges organisations to work much more in diagonal slices rather than in silos, to create collaborative and knowledgeable action teams who work on projects together, rather than separately.

 

 

The main focus of this work was to create a development process for the staff and departments to use as their core process.  One of the major issues inside the company was that people couldn't see design or it's process.  Taking the existing development process for SDS, I created a development wheel that takes new policy/ideas/projects from discovery to delivery using design led activity and thinking.

The development wheel has been approved by Skills Development Scotland's board and is now being used by the company to document existing work and develop new service experiences.

 

 

Further to the development wheel, I initiated a pilot project to look at how the company operate and deliver services to their customers.  The pilot is still ongoing and is focused on unlocking the expert knowledge of careers advisors and enabling them to use discovery and ethnographic techniques to understand the needs of their users from a service perspective, considering the entire experience, not just the moment of transaction.  The pilot will culminate in the staff running their own co-design workshop to build ideas about how their space can be re-designed from a service thinking perspective.  We will then lead staff through a prototyping phase to test the ideas they generated during the workshop, and build a visual report that outlines bigger systemic issues that need to be tackled by the organisation.

[post_title] => Embedding design in Skills Development Scotland [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => embedding-design-in-skills-development-scotland [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=165 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [91] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 328 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2010-07-11 12:54:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-07-11 12:54:22 [post_content] => Yesterday I had the absolute pleasure of being interviewed by the lovely Suze Ingram ; a user-experience designer, founder of Service Design Hub in Australia and a big thinker.

You can find out more about the hub and follow Suze on twitter. Yet another inspiring conversation with someone who is sowing the seeds of service design in their own country where it is still unknown and unfamiliar. Thank you Suze for a great conversation and I am sending you smiles from one side of the world to the other. [post_title] => Lauren's interview with Service Design Hub in Oz [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => laurens-interview-with-service-design-hub-in-oz [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-12-04 00:10:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-04 00:10:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wearesnook.com/?p=328 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [92] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19567 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2020-07-01 16:34:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-07-01 16:34:31 [post_content] => Throughout his career, Tom has worked with a diverse range of contexts including workplace strategy, sustainable mobility, domestic energy use, building retrofit and has volunteered with community organisations focusing on food campaigning. More recently, Tom has been designing services which incentivise the adoption of sustainably oriented services in parts of Milan, Lisbon and London. Tom has a particular passion for design practices that support environmental and social regeneration and is a huge believer in the importance of design in creating compelling and desirable futures. Away from Snook, Tom loves being on his allotment or searching for secluded routes around the chiltern hills on his bike. Tom has two very energetic daughters who try their hardest to prevent him from doing any of the above. [post_title] => Tom White [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tom-white [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-01 16:34:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-01 16:34:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=19567 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [93] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19547 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2020-07-01 16:09:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-07-01 16:09:01 [post_content] => Gillian is a graduate from Glasgow School of Art, where she studied Communication Design (BA Hons) with a specialism in all things Photography. Since graduating in 2018, Gillian worked with Outspoken Arts Scotland LTD, an arts production company in Paisley, who celebrate equality and those with protected characteristics through the arts. Her role was ‘Digital Marketing Officer Intern’ as well as designing everything from merchandise, poster design to a limited edition archival publication. She has experience within Retail, Digital Marketing and Design throughout her early career. She is passionate about self-love, sustainability, helping others and making a positive impact on the world.   Outside of Snook, you will probably see Gillian documenting the world around her through her Photography, describing herself as a Photographic Storyteller. Gillian is a Vegetarian and is always on the hunt for new Veggie/Vegan products to try and recipes to cook. When she isn't cooking, she loves to explore all the amazing Veggie/Vegan restaurants where-ever she goes. So if you need any suggestions on all things veg, Gillian is your gal! [post_title] => Gillian Lochhead [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => gillian-lochhead [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-01 16:09:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-01 16:09:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=19547 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [94] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19539 [post_author] => 57 [post_date] => 2020-07-01 15:50:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-07-01 15:50:55 [post_content] => After studying Graphic Design, she boarded the digital world almost by chance. Vanda believes that creating accessible and sustainable interface solutions is the key to balancing the relationship between users and technology in the future. That’s also why she enjoys learning about users and talking to people. From a very young age, she has also been obsessed with form and colour and she explores this in her spare time through illustration and photography. It is easy for her to find beauty in every corner. [post_title] => Vanda Gomes [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => vanda-gomes [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-07-01 16:32:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-07-01 16:32:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=people&p=19539 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => people [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [95] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19487 [post_author] => 55 [post_date] => 2020-05-28 13:20:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-28 13:20:43 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

As a Tech Lead at Snook, you will work alongside our other tech leads to assist in the day-to-day running of the development work within our digital design team, and provide oversight of their technical delivery.  You will work with the team to develop digital products and services, making the best use of budget to provide value for our clients and to our internal projects. You will help create a strong team ethic and foster a culture of partnership, consistent delivery, operational excellence and continuous improvement.  You will foster strong engineering practices, team dynamics and delivery. You will have experience of user centered design and delivery and foster a good working relationship between UI/UX staff and the rest of the build team.  Our Tech Leads will report to the Head of Digital and will collaborate across our user-centered disciplines, including service design, user research, operations and comms. 

Requirements 

You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy. We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training. We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion. We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells. Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead. We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer. We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app. We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started. We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, however all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter and your notice period. Send your CV and cover letter pdfs to 'apply-f0fe13d0220301@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: Tech Lead”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.    [post_title] => Tech Lead/Lead Developer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => tech-lead-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-23 10:52:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-23 10:52:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19487 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [96] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19451 [post_author] => 29 [post_date] => 2020-05-18 14:36:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-18 14:36:57 [post_content] =>

This post is the first of a series in which we’ll look at how the UK social landscape has been shaped by COVID-19 and especially government, healthcare and communities. Our focus in these posts will be to share insights and tools that people can take away to help address their own challenges. 

  At Snook, one of our missions is to work toward a kinder and smarter next era of government, and so we have an immediate interest in current shifts in how public services work. Some of these services are new and very visible, like financial support mechanisms for people and organisations in crisis, or contact-tracing initiatives.  Others, however, might be less visible, but ultimately represent longer-term changes in the relationship between government and public.  In this post, we’ll share insights that we’ve gained from developing a tool that enables local councils to run official meetings online – an example of how everyday processes of democratic decision making are being forced to change by the crisis, and what long-term impacts might result

The democratic process, live from the kitchen table 

Before the pandemic only about 12% of the UK workforce regularly worked from home, with less than 30% having ever worked from home, so relatively few people or organisations had systems in place for staff to work from home. While it attracts little mainstream attention, how best to work from home takes on a different significance when it includes core parts of our democratic process.  In the UK, local government meetings are involved in granting permits, licenses, and planning permission, as well as allocating resources and budgets in their area; and a pandemic has meant local governments  needing to find ways to hold such meetings online Defining a service that would meet the legal requirements of a democratic process in a virtual space is more complex than it might first appear. From the second week of the lockdown, Liam Hinshelwood and Liv Comberti from the Snook team began to work with Neil Terry and Chris Cadman-Dando from Adur & Worthing Councils (A&W) to do so. We wanted to describe some of their insights from the development process, and launch a set of reflections for further conversations. 

How do meetings work in physical versus virtual space?

The meeting script. Council meetings run to a tight script. Adhering to an agreed structure is what makes these meetings legally binding. Although some functions of a meeting could be done in writing rather than in person, this would remove the opportunity for everyone to express their opinion as easily, make ‘responding’ in real time more difficult, and limit public participation. Finding ways to take the script online is preferable.  The physical space. Council meetings tend to occur in purpose-built chambers. These spaces are usually organised around a hierarchy, with the person chairing the meeting and their deputies in the centre, and the legal officer seated nearby to offer guidance where necessary. Those who will present, and those who are eligible to vote on arguments, are arranged around them. This makes it easy to see who is guiding the process. The virtual space. All this changes in a virtual context. Here, everyone is ‘on the same level’. The performative characteristics of space have changed, and adjustments to behaviour are necessary – people talk over each other, need to remember to mute microphones, and we also tend to see more casual dress and participants’ homes in the background. The whole atmosphere changes.    [caption id="attachment_19474" align="aligncenter" width="1549"]The need for rapid adaptation from a built for purpose physical space to working from home is not limited to the UK. Left: An image of the empty Hackney Town Hall, UK. Right: A recent council meeting in Clinton, USA The need for rapid adaptation from a built for purpose physical space to working from home is not limited to the UK. Left: An image of the empty Hackney Town Hall, UK. Right: A recent council meeting in Clinton, USA[/caption]

What are the practical problems and solutions of moving council meetings online?

Who is responsible for tech and training? Currently there is no dedicated software to conduct either council or any other democratic meetings. Software decisions usually fall to the IT department, however, because of the urgency of moving online, the responsibility for these decisions fell to the Democratic Services Support Team at A&W. They found a need to train councillors and members of the public who were due to participate in how to use the video conferencing software and digital devices to participate in virtual meetings. Chris says “In some cases, councillors have had comparatively low exposure to modern digital technology, and it is essential that we make sure the training they receive in the necessary applications allows their other, more traditional skills (debate, scrutiny and decision making), to shine through”. Training 70 councillors was, in itself, very resource intensive – imagine what it would be like to train hundreds at larger councils.   Scale and roles have an impact. Council meetings are of different sizes, depending on location and even the subject under discussion. For example, A&W meetings are often 30-60 people, which is relatively small and can work on a call. However, for some other councils these meetings can be much larger (e.g. Birmingham Council with around 300 councillors). As Neil from A&W observes: “In a remote context you can easily control a planning committee of 8 participants, but as the numbers increase, so do the challenges, exponentially.” The roles needed in a virtual context will be, to a degree, highly connected with their scale – facilitating a call with 20 people is not the same as facilitating one with 200+!  New roles. “There’s a need for new roles and new responsibilities in these virtual council meetings,” Liv from Snook says, “and we are only just beginning to understand what these are ”. As Chris describes: “We have identified new technical roles that we would not normally have to consider at traditional meetings. This has meant that we have had to identify additional resources outside of our small Democratic Services Support Team, and train and prepare those people we bring in. In addition to this, traditional roles such as that of the chairman now require different skills and knowledge which has been challenging.” Trade-offs between software and protocol. Most council constitutions require public visibility on how each councillor has voted. In A&W, this is done by councillors verbally confirming their vote. However, in larger councils, registering hundreds of verbal votes one at a time is impractical. The processes councils follow and the tasks required are tied in with the platforms they are using. Infrastructure limitations. Designing around participants’ internet connectivity is a huge challenge. At best it can mean councillors being forced to abstain from voting on issues where they haven’t heard the full debate. The risk increases when the chair or legal counsel’s connection drops. And that’s clearly not the worst that can happen

How can we enable the public to take part – and given that digital inclusiveness is always a problem, what new challenges might arise?

Technology shifts who is being included and excluded. Liv explains: “Physical meetings may exclude parents, disabled people, or simply those living busy lives. Virtual meetings are more likely to exclude older generations or those without access to the technology needed. But overall, virtual meetings may actually be more accessible.”  A less intimidating prospect. Members of the public can now see both the meeting and what participation involves much more easily than they could before. The formality and pomp of physical meetings disappears, making them more approachable and open to all.

How can issues like these be addressed?

The biggest challenge the Snook team found was not the ability of a council team to systematically come up with a solution to every issue outlined above – something they excelled at. It was the sheer amount to think about, and the risk of overlooking or not anticipating something that turned out to be critical. As Chris points out: “In some cases we have protocols for dealing with issues and we can adapt them to the online context. However, there are challenges that you would never ever think about.”  Some councils have been discovering these the hard way. This means greater demands on council resources in a time where they are already considerably overstretched. A new tool. With this in mind, we worked with the A&W team to create an extensive blueprint of every stage of the process – from meeting set-up through post-meeting admin – in granular detail. At every stage the team considered behaviours, hardware, software, governance, and legislative risks. “They shared that what they found incredibly helpful about that”, Liv says, “was that it ensured there was nothing they hadn’t thought about – it was a very comprehensive lens. It wasn’t about putting something in each cell – in a way the blueprint acted as a checklist for them to make sure they’d thought about everything and proposed solutions”.   [caption id="attachment_19472" align="aligncenter" width="1999"]A&W Remote Council Meetings Blueprint A&W Remote Council Meetings Blueprint[/caption] A user manual for governance. Ultimately, a blueprint is a difficult thing to follow, and not every participant needs to know the whole process. Liv told us, “We need a big picture of the whole process, broken down into the different roles required, so that people can see where their role fits in, including members of the public. What we really need to exist is a user manual for each member of a council meeting”.  [caption id="attachment_19473" align="aligncenter" width="1999"]Sketch of A&W remote council meeting process by roles Sketch of A&W remote council meeting process by roles[/caption] Local variation. Such a blueprint would be different for individual councils. “ While there is a centralised Local Government Act 2000 that outlines a strong common framework for what should and shouldn’t be done, implementation is different at a local level. They are currently changing the governance to reflect the current situation”, Liam says.  At Snook, we are deeply interested in understanding what kind of long-term impact will result from these changes and interventions. While it’s likely that many councils will move back towards physical meetings, there are aspects of online provision that we would like to see pursued, especially its ability to make meetings more approachable and accessible. We see digital not just as a lever to transform delivery channels, but as a creator of new activities and roles which will shape what governance will look like around the world.  As Neil puts it: “Whilst the current legislation allowing remote meetings is only in place until next year, we’re planning on some form of remote participation being here to stay. Before the lockdown, we had pressures from those who welcomed remote participation and those who opposed it. In demonstrating what is possible, the opposition has dropped and we’re in the process of shaping the new normal”.  We’d like to thank Adur and Worthing Council for involving us in this interesting piece of work, and Benedict and Marta from Rival for partnering with us on the research for this post. If you’d like to get involved in discussing redesign of democratic processes for inclusion and accessibility in the digital age, please get in touch. [post_title] => Reflections on Covid-19: Exploring remote democratic decision making [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => exploring-remote-democratic-decision-making [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://wearesnook.com/our-principles-for-digital-inclusivity/ [post_modified] => 2020-05-18 15:36:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-05-18 15:36:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19451 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [97] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19441 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2020-04-30 16:17:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-04-30 16:17:46 [post_content] => We are excited to share with you that an early version of the service recipes for charities platform is now live and is the result of the collaboration of Catalyst with FutureGov, Snook and CAST It collects practical examples to help charities reuse and learn from one another’s digital services. We have been referring to those as recipes: they show the ingredients and steps needed to deliver a service. By charities, for charities, for inspiration or straightforward implementation. These recipes can be reused as they are, or tweaked as necessary. We believe that re-using existing tools and code can help charities solve service design and delivery problems more quickly than building a tool from scratch. It can save time and money, and build a team’s confidence along the way. The platform is in Alpha stage: that means it’s a real thing, it is publicly available and can be used by people, but it is still likely to develop further in response to feedback. We have been sharing this concept with some charities over the last few months and decided to build it, as the feedback we received was overwhelmingly positive. We are aware though, that the devil is in the detail. That’s why we are sharing it openly. By getting it live, we are hoping to boost our learning process for what works and what doesn’t so that we can iterate more quickly based on the findings. We are launching it today with a small but exciting collection of service recipes, with more to follow in the next few weeks. The recipes were contributed by a range of charities, some who have had a strong digital focus for years and others who are just starting out. We Are With You are offering webchat services in order to support people dealing with addiction and mental health issues. It took one week to get the web chat services up and running and demand for the service has remained steady at 50-70 sessions a day. With You's recipe includes how they selected their tools, set up and are staffing the service as well as guidance around how to implement web chat successfully. Young Somerset support young adults with 1-to-1 therapy. In response to COVID-19, they quickly shifted their service online and were able to find a solution that met NHS governance and security requirements. In Young Somerset's recipe, you’ll find how they made the decision to move online, what tools and software they used and risks they considered due to the now remote delivery of the service.  Being Woman offer women digital skills training  to increase inclusion and equality. To help people stay connected during lock down they distributed tablets and laptops and helped them gain skills and confidence to get online. Being Woman’s recipe covers the learning resources and digital inclusion schemes they partnered with, such as  Learn My Way, Make It Click and  Devicesdotnow. We want to thank all the charities who have already provided us with service recipes about the challenges that they’re currently facing and services they are providing.  We will add more recipes every week and we need organisations like yours to share the digital solutions you have had success with or that you are trialling at the moment. With each recipe shared, the library will grow and it’s our hope that you’ll also benefit from it too in the near future.  To share your recipes, you can fill in this form in or send us an email at recipes@thecatalyst.org.uk For platforms and initiatives such as this around reuse, to succeed we need to know if the recipes have helped you and your organisation build a new service, or improve an existing one. We would like to hear from you, whether for general feedback or to share how you used an existing recipe.  Finally, if  you want to learn more about service recipes and our thinking behind it, we talked about service patterns and life events here. This was originally posted by the wonderful team working across the catalyst. [post_title] => Service recipes: our new tool to help you get inspired by how other charities deliver services [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => service-recipes-our-new-tool-to-help-you-get-inspired-by-how-other-charities-deliver-services [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-04-30 16:17:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-04-30 16:17:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19441 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [98] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19410 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-04-17 13:46:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-04-17 13:46:32 [post_content] =>

About the company

Snook are on a mission to design a world that works better for people. We work with organisations to design more effective services which help people thrive. We do this by engaging with users, building digital products, training our clients, and much more. This year we’re ten years old. In the past five years, we’ve scaled to more than double our original size when we started up in Scotland. We've opened a London office and our team is approaching 40 people. And we've worked with brilliant clients — from Cancer Research UK and Tesco to Hackney City Council and the Scottish Government.

About the role

We are looking to recruit a Head of Digital to provide strong leadership, direction and coaching within our digital design department.  Our digital design team is composed of interaction designers, full-stack developers, technical leads, content designers and data experts.  We’re looking for someone to take a lead in growing our capacity, developing the service offer, supporting the tech leads, and ensuring we’ve got the right skills and tools to do the job.  We are looking for someone with previous senior developer experience, who is keen to move to a more strategic management position.  You should have proven experience of growing, nurturing and running a digital product design and delivery team. You will have the authority and experience to make key decisions on technical matters such as code base, architecture and hosting.  The role will ensure the team does their best work, maintaining consistency of high quality delivery across our projects. You will help push us to meet our mission by designing services that have real impact on people’s lives. You will work with our Head of Design to grow and develop our product development and design practice across Snook’s studios and our partners. You will help set a digital product approach for Snook that ties in with our aims and principles, and sets direction for the way that we design digital services and products across the wider team.

Requirements 

You should be able to demonstrate that you are able to meet some, or all, of the following requirements:

Your skills and experience

We’re keen to hear from a range of applicants who can demonstrate some, or all, of the following skills and experience:

What we offer 

Snook offer a competitive salary, 29.5 holidays per year (including public holidays), additional annual Christmas closure and a supportive maternity leave policy We provide an annual training budget for external opportunities from talks and conferences to more bespoke hands-on training We respect that people have commitments and provide flexible working hours through discussion We have an annual team-away retreat for us to come together as a company, taking time out to learn, reflect, and eat snacks. We spend a Friday together every quarter as one studio to run show and tells Every Monday morning, we have a team breakfast where we eat together and share our ambitions for the week ahead We are an equal opportunity, Disability Confident and Living Wage Foundation employer We have a bike to work scheme and free membership to HeadSpace the mental health app We support you with a Snook buddy when you join to get you started We strive for diversity in our team. If we’re going to design services for the public we need to ensure our team is inclusive. We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and ages, but all applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

How to apply 

This is a rolling recruitment campaign so please don't wait to submit your application. We are sifting and interviewing candidates on a weekly basis. Please submit a CV, cover letter and your notice period. Send your CV and cover letter as pdfs to 'apply-92573e2358ac01@snook-ltd.breezy-mail.com' with the title “Hire me: Head of Digital”. In your covering letter, please tell us a little bit about yourself, why you want to work at Snook and what sort of design problems you’d be interested in tackling with us. Due to the current Covid-19 epidemic, we anticipate that all interviews will be conducted remotely. We will offer interviews at times that suit you, so if you have children, caring duties, or other circumstances affecting your availability for an interview, we’re happy to offer convenient times outside of work hours.    [post_title] => **CLOSED** Head of Digital [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => head-of-digital [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-16 11:01:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-16 11:01:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?post_type=jobs&p=19410 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => jobs [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [99] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19326 [post_author] => 92 [post_date] => 2020-04-03 14:29:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-04-03 14:29:26 [post_content] =>

A crisis like Covid-19 requires urgent emergency responses. With crises come feelings of panic and we see lots of people running quickly towards the problem to help. But we know those feelings of panic tend to inhibit us to short-term thinking only.

There are various practical ways we’ve been addressing just getting on with the work we’re already doing at Snook. We’re conducting remote user research with control room operators — designing a rapid response to emergency calls seems more pressing than ever when the volume of calls they’re handling is unprecedented. We’re also continuing our work with British Sign Language communities and the National Citizen Service to improve their services. We’re running workshops using video conferencing-delivering a training session in service design for NHS National Services Scotland and convening with 100 designers and charities to look at ways to combine forces in their response to Covid-19. But it’s not just approaches to working remotely. There’s a bigger picture emerging of a world that may have to be restructured radically and will require a considered, long-term strategy to solving all the challenges which we will face globally in the wake of this.

Setting our response principles

We’ve been holding working sessions to discuss our response as a team to Covid-19. At first, we all felt a sense of panic — what can we do to help now? Apart from staying indoors and joining our local volunteer networks, where can we help? The usual questions came up, like asking if civic society needs an app to better organise themselves or building smart emergency response services? The answer was, and is, no. In the second week, we started to understand the scale of the challenge hanging over us and help clients organise and think through their emergency response. As we hit our third week of working in this ‘new normal’, we recognised we needed to set some principles about how we can support our clients past and present. We need to move from a crisis response state to being a calm supportive partner who’s looking ahead.

Our principles and approach to designing in times of crisis:

1. Show what’s possible

  Person shouting through a megaphone There are a huge number of things that need to be completely rethought right now, but bringing about these types of changes can seem overwhelming. For example, making internet access universally free to all those who are currently classified as vulnerable seemed like a pipedream. But we’re taking an approach to change a small thing and seed the bigger idea. We worked quickly with Nominet to get mobile phone operators to zero rate access to nhs.uk, so everyone can access accurate, up-to-date health information during the pandemic. A small win — and now they’re stepping up to provide access to a whole host of sites with new data packages. But this is just the start of a wider job of ensuring everyone is included in a world where there’s a growing assumption that just putting everything online is the answer. It’s not that simple. An estimated 1 in 10 households in the UK have no access to the internet. There are school pupils and students who are currently being told to do their lessons online and are simply unable to. Many elderly people feel they lack the skills to use computers, and the number of homeless is steadily rising, and while some may have phones, they frequently run out of data. These people are being allowed to fall through the cracks right now. But, with this challenge, many small prototypes working in the open can seed the change, and we’ll continue to press for these, linking them to wider positive agendas.

2. Balance immediate needs with the long-term view

Covid-19 will have a dramatic impact beyond the next week, and the month after. Not only specifically in the new normal of physically distancing that has been forced upon us but also in our ability to think, connect and live differently in the future. Who would have thought that in a matter of weeks, we could house everyone who is homeless? Or reduce our C02 emissions so quickly? In the short term, we’re supporting organisations to rethink service delivery with new Government regulations in the now — to support the people at highest risk (the elderly, the immunocompromised). But with this, we must ensure we also take a longer-term view and consider what might come next. There’s then the medium term. What’s coming in the next 4–6 weeks. Data from some of the most highly affected areas in the world such as Italy, shows us that the coming month is about to get much worse and we’ve heard from clients that workforces are depleting by up to a third in vital services like children’s social care. How we staff and continue to deliver vital services needs to be considered now and over the next few months as staff self-isolate or go off sick due to the virus. In the longer term, we’ll see much bigger impacts. How will people who’ve been in self-isolation for months feel? What are the long-term mental health impacts? How will a frontline workforce working in emergency mode feel in six months time after experiencing death, sickness and fear every day? What will happen to our food chains when we rely on much of our produce being imported and transport has been halted? What happens to homeless people we’ve housed in this period when the curve flattens? There are so many questions that need a longer-term view but need to be considered now, so we can start designing for these new needs and scenarios before they arrive on our doorstep.

3. Listen first, look second, build last

Our perspective is to listen first, understand needs, look at what exists then build if needed. We don’t know best. There are vast networks of grassroots efforts, civic sector organisations and charities that know their people and areas well. There are service providers who are experts in what they deliver and the people they support. We’ve seen a host of new services spring up, sometimes outside the organisation’s core expertise, because they saw a need and tried to fill it. We’re keen to help organisations understand their specific skill sets and how they can be put to use alongside others, stopping them from pivoting everything to solve the immediate crisis. If there’s a clear need for something new which no one else can meet, then build it. But listen first, and find out whether someone already does what’s needed and connect them up. Developing a new product or service at this time isn’t needed unless it helps with convening safely or delivering an existing service online. It will just add to the noise.

4. Meet immediate needs safely

Where there is a need, and something does need to be built, it must still meet regulations and good design principles. Yas, research and design will need to move at pace to meet new daily Government announcements or emergent societal needs. But a crisis doesn’t mean throwing out all data, ethical, privacy and accessibility principles. We have basic accessibility guidelines and tools to build quick services that work for people. We have data ethics workbooks to help us ask the questions we should ask to ensure that what we’re doing safeguards users. Organisations like the Information Commissioner’s office have provided supportive statements to help organisations get online at speed — assuring them that they won’t be penalised, but careful to ensure privacy and data standards are not dropped entirely. Even in a crisis, we should not ignore safeguarding and ethical data practice. We must think through our service designs to ensure we put no one in harm’s way.

5. Shape challenges, convene responses

Through our listening, we’re hearing common challenges from all types of organisations. Some of the simpler questions are how to deliver a support programme online. Or get digital access for the people they support. Or figure out how to support people paying for goods delivered to them who aren’t online.We can help by finding common problems and shaping these, convening the right people to solve them and publishing this knowledge. We’re about to bring this principle to life in our work across the Catalyst. This is an alliance of civil society organisations, funders, and digital agencies, incubated on behalf of the Centre for Acceleration of Social Technology. We’ve been working with them and Futuregov to build a list of common transactions that charities and civil society organisations might deliver and how these might be delivered online. We’re going to convene groups of service providers to discuss, share and publish how they’ve taken their services online so others can learn from this, in a series of patterns.

6. Stimulate learning loops

In a crisis, we have a tendency to deliver at speed then rush off to put the next fire out. But many of us are delivering services in ways we have never delivered before. We are learning what works, what doesn’t and what to do differently. We have a role to play in stimulating learning cycles and sharing them with others. Only together, can we learn how to meet the present and near-future needs well. We’re encouraging our clients to keep a short learning log during this time so they can look back and share what’s working and what needs to change. Last week, we held an online conversation involving charities, digital experts, designers, change-makers and commissioners. Someone said after the call that they’d been inspired to make sure they document their learnings, as they’re trying out lots of new ways of delivering their service remotely. Let’s keep inspiring those learnings.

Looking further into the future

We’re mindful of how often great shifts in society can happen after upheavals like this. The NHS was founded in the wake of the second world war. It cost an enormous amount of money — but aren’t we grateful for it now? It also took a great long-term vision and a commitment to the common good. The belief that things can be different and that we can design them to be better for everyone and everything on the planet seemed like a fantasy only a few weeks ago. But in the past two weeks, people are having to face a new reality that’s being foisted upon them. There’s a future to plan for beyond the pandemic. We need to reflect on what we want to keep from how we used to live and what must change to make a fairer, more sustainable future for all. We’ll be considering this in a series of posts soon. In the meantime, do get in touch if you’d like to get involved in designing the best response to the present — and the future — together. [post_title] => We need long-term thinking now more than ever [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => we-need-long-term-thinking-now-more-than-ever [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-04-06 16:43:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-04-06 16:43:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://wearesnook.com/?p=19326 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 100 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19493 [post_author] => 20 [post_date] => 2020-06-01 12:41:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-06-01 12:41:25 [post_content] => On this Service Design Day 2020 we wanted to reflect on the many routes our team had taken into service design.  At Snook we currently have 32 service designers  and we asked them to tell us about their education and what led them to service design. Unsurprisingly 27 of our team had completed undergraduate degrees in design and you can see the different courses they took outlined below. Seventeen of our Service Design staff also have Masters degrees and 12 of these are specifically in design-related subjects. We have always been fortunate in our ability to recruit staff from across the world, giving us a strong international perspective, and we currently have staff from Australia and New Zealand, Taiwan, all across Europe (from Sweden to Portugal), and also Central America. Valerie Carr, our Director of Strategy shares her personal story of her introduction to service design by reflecting on who she learned from and what she learned. I’m the single Interior Design Graduate in the chart above and, after graduation, worked in Interior Design until I had my first son in 1989. I then completed a Masters in Computer Aided Design and worked for a while doing computer generated graphics for architects before moving into lecturing part-time.  I continued lecturing right through the birth of three more sons,  then decided to embark upon a PhD when the youngest was four.  We obtained funding from NHS Estates  to conduct a joint Project involving the School of Design and School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Dundee.  The project aimed to evaluate the impact of the built environment on birth mothers, their partners and staff in maternity units. I had the great privilege of being supervised by Tom Inns, a pioneer in Design for Innovation, and learning research methods from the team at the Social Dimensions of Health Institute.  I also learned a lot about evidence-based design and the importance of rigour in user research from the team at Center for Healthcare Design. Anyone interested in the outputs from the project can find my thesis here - but I warn you, it’s very long! It was while evaluating the impact of the built environment that I became interested in how we might design organisations and services to better meet the needs of those who access them. It  became clear that some elements of the interior environment which have been designed for specific  benefit did not achieve the desired impact because of organisational constraints related to how services were delivered.  After taking a midlife gap year in Burundi, Central East Africa, in 2009 we relocated to Lancaster where I worked as Research Associate on an 18 month research project “Design in Practice”.  This project built on the foundations of the Design Council Red Programme, the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement experience-based design approach, and the work of Ezio Manzini and team at Politecnico di Milano. It also gave me the opportunity to work with and learn from an amazing team at Imagination Lancaster.  Prof Rachel Cooper has been instrumental in defining the role of designers in the 20th/21st century (check the link to see another familiar name in Scottish Service Design circles). Daniela Sangiorgi was one of the first academics really exploring Service Design as a discipline in its own right, tracing the origins from other disciplines. The other members of our project team, Sabine Junginger and Monika Buscher brought valuable insights from Design Management and Sociology. Our reflections on the development of Service Design can be found in the papers we wrote.  In 2012, I joined Snook, who were the first (and only at that time) Service Design company in Scotland. Over the past 8 years I’ve had the privilege of working on a wide variety of projects across the UK and beyond. We've seen our team grow from 5 to over 50, and the breadth, depth and impact of our projects increase. We’ve seen User-Centred Design and Service Design become mainstream with the establishment of Government Digital Services and the Scottish approach to service design. Meeting user-centred design criteria has become mandatory for government services in both Scotland and the wider UK. I think back to the absolute bewilderment and frustration expressed by one of the GPs involved in our Design in Practice project in 2009, “I just don’t understand what design has to do with clinical practice!’ and hope more people across the public, third and private sector value the contribution design can bring to making services work better for everyone. 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